4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Asylum Company.

  1. Marian S. Carson collection of manuscripts, 1656-1995

    14,250 items ; 57 containers plus 27 oversize ; 26.4 linear feet -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collector. A collection of Americana including historical letters and documents, family and personal papers, broadsides, financial and legal papers, illustrated and printed ephemera, government and legislative documents, military records, journals, and printed matter relating primarily to the expansion and development of the United States from the colonial period through the 1876 centennial.

  2. Read family papers, 1568-1906

    35 items ; 8 containers ; 2 linear feet -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Read (Reed) family of New Castle, Delaware, later of Pennsylvania. Correspondence, deeds and indentures, genealogical records, commissions, printed matter, and other material. Papers of George Read relate chiefly to his activities during the American Revolution and his law practice in New Castle. Papers of John Read include a notebook of correspondence and memoranda which he kept as secretary of...

  3. Thomas Truxtun papers, 1796-1885

    18 items ; 1 container ; 0.2 linear feet -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States Navy officer. Correspondence, property share, funeral announcement, and other printed matter relating to Truxtun's resignation from the United States Navy in 1802 and to his duties as sheriff of Philadelphia, Pa., also including an 1885 article on Truxtun's grandson, William Talbot Truxtun.

  4. John Nicholson family papers, 1786-1868

    800 items ; 2 containers ; .8 linear feet -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Financier, land speculator, and public official of Pennsylvania. Correspondence, diary fragments, business and financial records, and printed matter. The papers relate primarily to the Pennsylvania Land Company, the Asylum Company, and to Nicholson's other land holdings in Pennsylvania, the western territories, and Washington, D.C. Records of Nicholson's heirs relate to attempts to regain...