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Series II: Interviews (continued)
John and Jean Rosenberg oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Prestonburg, Kentucky, 2013-08-15.
Digital content available
Biographical History: John Rosenberg was an attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division. He was a prosecutor on the trials for the murders of James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman in Mississippi. He is the founder of AppalReD (Appalachian Research and Defense Fund) in Kentucky.
Biographical History: Jean Rosenberg was a research analyst for the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and the wife of lawyer John Rosenberg.
Summary: Jean and John Rosenberg begin this interview with recollections of their families' backgrounds. Jean learned about social issues as she was raised by a Quaker family in Pennsylvania, and John's family fled Germany under threat from the Nazis. Jean attended Wilmington College and became a research analyst for the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division. John grew up in Gastonia, North Carolina, where FBI agents kept tabs on his family, attended Duke University, served in the Air Force, and attended the University of North Carolina School of Law. He became an attorney with the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division, which became effective after reorganization by John Doar. Much of this interview concerns Jean and John's work with the Civil Rights Division, including support for voter registration efforts in Georgia and Alabama, the investigation of the Hartman Turnbow case, in which a black activist was arrested for an arson attempt on his own home, and an effort to address a murder in Mississippi. John also addresses the effects of the Voting Rights Act in the South, the role of the lawyers in the Civil Rights Division in relation to the FBI and local law enforcement, and a variety of other cases and issues he dealt with. After retirement, the Rosenbergs founded the Appalachian Citizens Law Center.
Moving Images
10 video files of 10 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (157 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0100_mv01-10
Manuscripts
1 transcript (70 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0100_Rosenbergs_transcript
William R. Lawrence oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Roanoke, Virginia, 2013-08-16.
Biographical History: William Lawrence was a long-time employee of the Norfolk and Western Railroad in Roanoke, Virginia.
Summary: William Lawrence describes his long career with the Norfolk and Western Railroad in Roanoke, Virginia. Lawrence was born in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1922 but grew up in Roanoke and worked for the railroad most of his adult life. He discusses conditions of labor, race relations at the workplace, and his experience working as a foreman.
Moving Images
4 video files of 4 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (45 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0101_mv01-04
Manuscripts
1 transcript (33 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0101_Lawrence_transcript
Oliver W. Hill, Jr., oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Petersburg, Virginia, 2013-08-17.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Oliver W. Hill, Jr., was the soon of civil rights attorney Oliver W. Hill, Sr. He integrated the Richmond, Virginia, public schools as a child and became a professor of psychology.
Summary: Oliver W. Hill, Jr., discusses his father, civil rights lawyer Oliver Hill. He explains his father's childhood and education in Roanoke, Virginia, how he ended up at Howard University in the 1920s, where he was in the same class as Thurgood Marshall and studied law under Charles Hamilton Houston. In the 1930s Hill reunited with both of them to work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, which was focused on challenging segregation laws. Hill describes his own experience as a black student integrating a white school in Richmond, Virginia, attending Howard University, becoming a psychology professor at Virginia State University, and working with Bob Moses on the Algebra Project. He also discusses the education of African American children, school reform, and student testing.
Moving Images
5 video files of 5 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (73 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0102_mv01-05
Manuscripts
1 transcript (37 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0102_Hill_transcript
John Carlos oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in New York, New York, 2013-08-18.
Digital content available
Biographical History: John Carlos was a member of the American Olympic track team and was the Bronze Medalist at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico, where he protested racism around the world. He later played football in the NFL, and worked as a counselor and track and field coach.
Summary: John Carlos discusses his childhood in Harlem, New York, the changes that he saw in Harlem with the widespread use of heroin and the splintering of families, and describes the disparities in education for black children when he was growing up. He remembers the influence of black leaders including Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Carlos was recruited to run track at East Texas State University, where he experienced racial discrimination and was treated poorly by his coach. He explains his protest at the 1968 Olympics, including the symbols that he and Tommy Smith employed to protest racial discrimination, and he describes the emotional impact that the protest had on him.
Moving Images
9 video files of 9 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (127 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0103_mv01-09
Manuscripts
1 transcript (68 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0103_Carlos_transcript
Ekwueme Michael Thelwell oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Pelham, Massachusetts, 2013-08-23.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Dr. Ekwueme Michael Thelwell is a scholar, activist, writer, and administrator at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He served as a staff member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and worked as a civil rights activist in the deep South and in Washington, D.C.
Summary: Ekueme Michael Thelwell remembers his time as a student activist at Howard University and his experiences with the Nonviolent Action Group (NAG), the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP). Working primarily out of Washington, D.C., Thelwell marched in and organized demonstrations and made major contributions to SNCC and MFDP strategy around voter registration and the MFDP's 1965 effort to challenge the seating of the Mississippi congressional delegation. He details the developing MFDP strategy, his attempts to navigate Washington politics, and his relationships with various figures involved in the effort.
Moving Images
24 video files of 24 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (255 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0104_mv01-24
Manuscripts
1 transcript (116 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0104_Thelwell_transcript
Virginia Simms George oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Northborough, Massachusetts, 2013-08-24.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Virginia Simms George was a civil rights activist in Richmond, Virginia, and later a human resource professional, teacher, counselor in Massachusetts.
Summary: Virginia Simms George remembers growing up in segregated Newport News, Virginia, attending Virginia Union University, and her desire to become a lawyer. She recalls participating in a protest at Thalhimers department store in Richmond, Virginia. She discusses her work as a teacher, counselor, and volunteering for many organizations. She also discusses the commemoration of the protests in Richmond, and her thoughts on racism and other civil rights issues today.
Moving Images
6 video files of 6 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (73 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0105_mv01-06
Manuscripts
1 transcript (43 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0105_George_transcript
Robert J. Brown oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in High Point, North Carolina, 2013-10-01.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Robert J. Brown was a police officer and founder of B&C Associates, Inc., a public relations firm.
Summary: Robert Brown describes his childhood in High Point, North Carolina, the poverty and segregation that defined his childhood, and how his grandmother influenced him by telling stories about his family's history during slavery. Brown became one of the first black policemen in High Point and later transitioned to a position as a federal agent in New York. He returned to North Carolina in 1960 to start a public relations firm, B&C Associates, Inc., which advised companies about how to change policies on race and segregation. Brown also shares stories about serving as a special assistant to President Richard Nixon and his role in bringing attention to apartheid in South Africa through his relationship with Nelson Mandela and his family.
Moving Images
11 video files of 11 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (130 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0106_mv01-11
Manuscripts
1 transcript (59 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0106_Brown_transcript
Harry Blake oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Shreveport, Louisiana, 2013-10-03.
Digital content available
Biographical History: The Reverend Harry Blake is the pastor of Mt. Canaan Baptist Church in Shreveport, Louisiana. He served as the first field secretary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and as president of the Louisiana Baptist State Convention and General Secretary of the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.
Summary: The Reverend Doctor Harry Blake discusses his childhood on a plantation in Louisiana in the 1930s and 1940s and how he became a leader in the Civil Rights Movement in Shreveport, Louisiana. Blake joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1960 after he heard Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., give a speech at Bishop College in Texas, where he was a student. Blake discusses his pastorate at Mount Canaan Baptist Church in Shreveport, how he came to develop a good relationship with local politicians, and the work he continues to do within the context of the civil rights struggle.
Moving Images
4 video files of 4 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (70 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0107_mv01-04
Manuscripts
1 transcript (28 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0107_Blake_transcript
Abernathy family oral history interview conducted by Hasan Kwame Jeffries in Atlanta, Georgia and Stuttgart, Germany, 2013-10-10.
Biographical History: Donzaleigh Abernathy is an actress, producer, director, and writer in Los Angeles, California.
Biographical History: Juandalynn R. Abernathy is an opera, concert, and African-American spirituals singer.
Biographical History: Ralph David Abernathy, III, is a social justice activist, and a former Georgia State Senator and member of the State House of Representatives.
Summary: Donzaleigh Abernathy, Juandalynn Abernathy, and Ralph Abernathy, III, recall their father, Ralph David Abernathy and their own experiences as children in the Civil Rights Movement. The Abernathy children spent much of their childhoods with the children of Martin Luther King, Jr. Unlike the King children, the Abernathy siblings actively participated in direct action, including the Poor People's Campaign. All three children felt palpably the fear of violence in their everyday lives. This interview offers an intimate portrait of the home of a civil rights icon and of the intense friendship between Abernathy and King.
Moving Images
29 video files of 29 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (123 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0108_mv01-29
Manuscripts
1 transcript (65 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0108_Abernathy_transcript

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