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Series II: Interviews (continued)
Marilyn Luper Hildreth oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 2011-05-24
Digital content available
Biographical History: Marilyn Hildreth was born in 1947 in Oklahoma. Her mother, Clara Luper, was a teacher and local civil rights activist. Hildreth participated in many sit-ins and demonstrations with her mother and brother Calvin in Oklahoma City. She attended Douglass High School and worked in insurance sales and administration.
Summary: Marilyn Hildreth describes growing up in segregated Oklahoma and the leadership of her mother, Clara Luper, in the local National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) youth group. She recalls participating in a drug store sit-in as a child, and the success the group had with several restaurants in Oklahoma City. She remembers her mother's leadership in the African American community in Oklahoma, and her involvement in the 1968 sanitation workers' strike.
Moving Images
3 video files of 3 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (33 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0012_mv01-03
BOX-FOLDER 1/7Manuscripts
1 transcript (16 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0012_hildreth_transcript
Calvin Luper oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 2011-05-24
Digital content available
Biographical History: Calvin Luper was born in 1946 in Oklahoma. His mother, Clara Luper, was a teacher and local civil rights activist. He participated in many sit-ins and demonstrations with his mother and sister Marilyn in Oklahoma City. He attended Douglass High School and the University of Oklahoma and worked as an electrician.
Summary: Calvin Luper remembers his mother, Clara Luper, and her leadership in Oklahoma City's National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Youth Council. He recalls participating in sit-ins in drug stores and restaurants, and hosting a radio show with his mother. He also remembers other leaders in Oklahoma's Civil Rights Movement, including Dr. Charles N. Atkins, E. Melvin Porter, and Ada Lois Sipuel.
Moving Images
4 video files of 4 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (24 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0013_mv01-04
BOX-FOLDER 1/8Manuscripts
1 transcript (14 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0013_luper_transcript
James Oscar Jones oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Austin, Texas, 2011-05-25
Digital content available
Biographical History: James Oscar Jones was born in 1943 in Willisville, Arkansas, married Mildred Neal in 1963, and had three children. He attended Pine Bluff A & M College, the University of Arkansas, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He worked at the National Sharecroppers Fund, the Federation of Southern Cooperatives, Community Resource Group, and the Texas Department of Agriculture. He was a civil rights activist in Arkansas and member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
Summary: James Oscar Jones remembers growing up on a farm in Arkansas, the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, and attending the Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical, and Normal College in Pine Bluff. He discusses his involvement in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and meeting activists Bill Hansen and Ben Grinage. He recalls participating in sit-ins at Woolworth's drug store in Pine Bluff, and helping African Americans in rural areas become political candidates.
Moving Images
8 video files of 8 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (127 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0014_mv01-08
BOX-FOLDER 1/9Manuscripts
2 transcripts (57 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0014_jonesjames1_transcript
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0014_jonesjames2_transcript
Anne Sobol and Richard Barry Sobol oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in New Orleans, Louisiana, 2011-05-26
Digital content available
Biographical History: Richard Sobol was born in 1937 in the Bronx, New York and married Anne Buxton in 1975. He attended Union College and Columbia University School of Law. He worked as civil rights attorney in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Washington, D. C. His wife, Anne, was also a lawyer.
Summary: Richard Sobol discusses his early career as a lawyer in Washington, D. C., his involvement with the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee, and his decision to move to New Orleans to become a civil rights lawyer. He recalls meeting Robert Hicks of Bogalusa, Louisiana, being personally protected by the Deacons of Defense and Justice, and his involvement in many job discrimination cases brought against the Crown Zellerbach paper mill. He also discusses other employment, labor union, and housing discrimination cases he argued. His wife, Anne, is also briefly interviewed.
Moving Images
8 video files of 8 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (121 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0015_mv01-08
BOX-FOLDER 1/10Manuscripts
1 transcript (59 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0015_sobol_transcript
Cynthia Baker Anderson and Fletcher Anderson oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Bogalusa, Louisiana, 2011-05-27
Digital content available
Biographical History: Fletcher Anderson was born in 1938 in Bogalusa, Louisiana, married Cynthia Baker and had three children. He graduated from Central Memorial High School and worked at the Crown Zellerbach paper mill in many jobs, eventually as an overhead crane operator. He joined the Deacons of Defense and Justice and the Bogalusa Voters League, and was a leader of the Civil Rights Movement in Bogalusa.
Summary: Cynthia and Fletcher Anderson remember the segregation and job discrimination they faced in Bogalusa, Louisiana, and their decision to join the civil rights movement. Fletcher recalls working many different jobs at the Crown Zellerbach paper mill, the harassment of the police and Ku Klux Klan, and joining the Deacons of Defense and Justice. They discuss their job discrimination lawsuits, their friends involved in the Civil Rights Movement, and the current state of race relations in Bogalusa.
Moving Images
4 video files of 4 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (82 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0016_mv01-04
BOX-FOLDER 1/11Manuscripts
1 transcript (39 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0016_andersons_transcript
Hicks family oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Bogalusa, Louisiana, 2011-05-27
Digital content available
This interview is currently restricted.
Biographical History: Robert Hicks was born in 1929. He married Valeria Payton and had six children, Charles, Gregory, Robert Lawrence, Darryl, Carol Cummings Buras, and Barbara Hicks Collins. Robert Hicks was an employee of the Crown Zellerbach mill and a civil rights activist in Bogalusa, Louisiana. He was a leader in the local NAACP, his segregated union, the Bogalusa Civic and Voters League and the Deacons of Defense and Justice.
Summary: The Hicks family remembers their childhood in segregated Bogalusa, Louisiana, and their father, Robert Hicks, a local civil rights leader. They recall leading a children's civil rights march in Bogalusa to protest discrimination at Woolworth's, hosting two white civil rights workers, Bill Yates and Steve Miller, and being protected by the Deacons of Defense and Justice.
Moving Images
9 video files of 9 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (154 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0017_mv01-09
BOX-FOLDER 1/12Manuscripts
2 transcripts (71 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0017_hicks1_transcript
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0017_hicks2_transcript
Geraldine Crawford Bennett, Toni Breaux, and Willie Elliot Jenkins oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Bogalusa, Louisiana, 2011-05-28
Digital content available
Biographical History: Gayle Jenkins was born around 1937 in Bogalusa, Louisiana. She was a civil rights activist in Bogalusa and cousin of activist Robert Hicks. She had three children, Don Duane Exposé, Ms. Willie Exposé "Toni" Breaux, and Mr. Willie Elliott "Chuck" Jenkins. Gayle Jenkins' sister, Geraldine Crawford Bennett, worked as a maid in a segregated whites-only clinic and later as a nurse. Breaux attended Dillard University and Southeastern Louisiana University and worked as a teacher.
Summary: Geraldine Crawford Bennett, Toni Breaux, and Willie Elliot Jenkins remember their mother and sister Gayle Jenkins, a leader of the Civil Rights Movement in Bogalusa, Louisiana. They discuss their family history, how the family became involved in the movement, and Willie Jenkins' court case to integrate the public schools. They recall being protected by the Deacons of Defense and Justice, marching in local rallies, and memories of their late brother Don, who was also involved in the movement.
Moving Images
8 video files of 8 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (82 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0018_mv01-08
BOX-FOLDER 1/13Manuscripts
1 transcript (57 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0018_jenkins_transcript
Annie Pearl Avery oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Selma, Alabama, 2011-05-31
Digital content available
Biographical History: Annie Pearl Avery was born in 1943 in Birmingham, Alabama, and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She married Harrison Avery, had two children, and worked as a dishwasher in the 1960s. Avery was a civil rights activist and member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
Summary: Annie Pearl Avery remembers her childhood in Birmingham, Alabama, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and joining the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) at age sixteen. She recalls attending a SNCC meeting in Atlanta and being stranded and threatened in Marietta, Georgia, on the way home. She discusses her involvement in the Albany Movement, her many arrests for protesting, marching with William Moore, and participating in voter registration drives in many locations across the South.
Moving Images
7 video files of 7 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (91 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0019_mv01-07
BOX-FOLDER 2/1Manuscripts
1 transcript (45 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0019_avery_transcript
Gwendolyn M. Patton oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Montgomery, Alabama, 2011-06-01
Digital content available
Biographical History: Gwendolyn Patton was born 1943 in Detroit, Michigan. She attended Tuskegee University, Antioch College, Union Graduate School, and Interdenominational Institute of Theology. Patton was a civil rights activist and archivist.
Summary: Gwendolyn Patton discusses attending the Tuskegee Institute, where she became involved in many civil rights organizations and was elected student body president. She recalls hosting the Freedom Riders in 1961, and spending a year in a segregated sanitarium when she had tuberculosis. She recounts organizing Tuskegee students for the Selma to Montgomery March, occupying the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, and registering voters in Lowndes County.
Moving Images
8 video files of 8 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (111 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0020_mv01-08
BOX-FOLDER 2/2Manuscripts
1 transcript (50 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0020_patton_transcript
Charles F. McDew oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Albany, Georgia 2011-06-04
Digital content available
Biographical History: Charles McDew was born in 1938 in Massillon, Ohio. He attended Roosevelt University and South Carolina State University, and worked as a community organizer and educator at Metropolitan State University in Minnesota.
Summary: Charles McDew recalls growing up in Massillon, Ohio, his family's involvement in the steel mill unions and attending South Carolina State University. He remembers being arrested three times in two days for not obeying segregation laws in South Carolina, founding the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and registering voters in Mississippi.
Moving Images
5 video files of 5 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (82 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0021_mv01-05
BOX-FOLDER 2/3Manuscripts
1 transcript (27 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0021_mcdew_transcript
Charles Melvin Sherrod oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Albany, Georgia, 2011-06-04
Digital content available
Biographical History: Charles Sherrod was born in 1937 in Surry, Virginia, married Shirley Miller Sherrod in 1966 and had two children. He attended Virginia Union University and Union Theological Seminary, and worked as a community organizer and chaplain.
Summary: Charles Sherrod recalls how he became involved in the Albany Movement in Georgia, recruited local residents, and led marches and protests against segregation.
Moving Images
2 video files of 2 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (20 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0022_mv01-02
BOX-FOLDER 2/4Manuscripts
1 transcript (8 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0022_sherrodcharles_transcript
Joseph Echols Lowery oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Atlanta, Georgia, 2011-06-06
Digital content available
Biographical History: Joseph Lowery was born in 1921 in Huntsville, Alabama, married Evelyn Gibson in 1950, and had three children. He attended Paine College, Paine Theological Seminary, and Chicago Ecumenical Seminary. He worked as pastor and civil rights activist in Mobile, Alabama, and was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).
Summary: Joseph Lowery recalls his position as pastor at the Warren Street Church in Mobile, Alabama, in the 1950s. He remembers joining the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the differences in race relations between Mobile and other southern cities, and helping to found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). He reflects on the effectiveness of nonviolence, the libel suit against him, sit-ins across the country, and the Selma to Montgomery March.
Moving Images
4 video files of 4 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (63 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0023_mv01-04
BOX-FOLDER 2/5Manuscripts
1 transcript (26 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0023_lowery_transcript
Matthew J. Perry oral history interview conducted by Joseph Mosnier in Columbia, South Carolina, 2011-06-07
Digital content available
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