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Series II: Interviews (continued)
Walter Tillow oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Louisville, Kentucky, 2013-06-21.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Walter Tillow was a civil rights activist with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He was also a labor organizer for the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE), an anti-war activist, and member of the Communist Party.
Summary: Walter Tillow discusses how he joined the Civil Rights Movement as a college student and how that led him into labor and leftist movements. He describes his childhood in New York City and the leftist politics of his parents, as well as how he learned about the Movement as a college student at Harpur College and as a graduate student at Cornell University. In 1963 he joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and moved to Fayette County, Georgia where he worked on voter registration drives. He later worked in the SNCC communication office in Atlanta. He describes in detail the movement for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1965 he left the Movement to work for the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE) and he later worked for the Communist Party.
Moving Images
7 video files of 7 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (108 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0092_mv01-07
Manuscripts
1 transcript (59 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0092_TillowW_transcript
Lisa Anderson Todd oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Washington, D.C., 2013-06-24.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Lisa Anderson Todd was a civil rights activist with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). She later became a lawyer and judge.
Summary: Lisa Anderson Todd shares memories from when she was a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) volunteer in Mississippi in 1963 and her recollections of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City. Todd describes how she was introduced to the Movement during her participation in a work camp at Tougaloo College and how she went on to do voter registration work, first with the American Friends Service Committee in Greensboro, North Carolina, and then with SNCC in Greenville, Mississippi. Todd shares her memories as well as her book research on the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She also describes her college years at Cornell University; her decision to attend law school at Stanford; her interest in civil rights law; and her work as a lawyer and later as an administrative judge.
Moving Images
8 video files of 8 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (169 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0093_mv01-08
Manuscripts
1 transcript (67 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0093_Todd_transcript
William Lucy oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Washington, D.C., 2013-06-25.
Digital content available
Biographical History: William Lucy was a civil rights activist and labor leader with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME).
Summary: William Lucy discusses his role in the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) in the 1960s, especially how he and the union supported the 1968 sanitation workers' strike in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1966 Lucy started to work for AFSCME in Washington, D.C., as the Associate Director of the Department of Legislation and Community Affairs. Lucy explains AFSCME's support of the Civil Rights Movement, especially the push to expose the economic exploitation of African Americans. Lucy narrates the events of the 1968 sanitation workers strike in Memphis, discusses the involvement of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and describes the union's strategies. Lucy also discusses his involvement in the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists and the Free South Africa Movement.
Moving Images
5 video files of 5 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (78 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0094_mv01-05
Manuscripts
1 transcript (36 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0094_Lucy_transcript
Luis Zapata oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Silver Spring, Maryland, 2013-06-27.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Luis Zapata was an civil rights activist and labor organizer. He worked for the United Farm Workers, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Mississippi Freedom Labor Union, and many other organizations.
Summary: Luis Zapata describes his childhood in Orange County, California, and how he came to join the labor movement as a college student at San Jose State University. He discusses the organizing work he did with the United Farm Workers and how he ended up moving to Cleveland, Mississippi, for four years where he organized for the Mississippi Freedom Labor Union and helped to register voters with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Zapata also discusses his later involvement in the congressional campaign of Mike Espy as well as his participation in international movements for human rights.
Moving Images
6 video files of 6 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (122 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0095_mv01-06
Manuscripts
1 transcript (71 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0095_Zapata_transcript
John Dudley, Eleanor Stewart, Charles Jarmon, Frances Suggs, Harold Suggs, and Samuel Dove oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Hyattsville, Maryland, 2013-06-28.
Digital content available
Biographical History: John Dudley participated in the Adkin High School walkout of 1951 in Kinston, North Carolina. He later worked as a youth home director for the Bureau of Rehabilitation in Washington, D.C.
Biographical History: Samuel Dove participated in the Adkin High School walkout of 1951 in Kinston, North Carolina. He was also a civil rights activist with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
Biographical History: Charles Jarmon participated in the Adkin High School walkout of 1951 in Kinston, North Carolina. He later became a professor of sociology and associate dean at Howard University
Biographical History: Frances Suggs participated in the Adkin High School walkout of 1951 in Kinston, North Carolina. She later became a music teacher and manager in Washington, D.C.
Biographical History: Harold Suggs participated in the Adkin High School walkout of 1951 in Kinston, North Carolina. He later became a businessman and educator in Washington, D.C.
Biographical History: Eleanor Stewart participated in the Adkin High School walkout of 1951 in Kinston, North Carolina. She later became a vocalist, conductor, and music teacher in Washington, D.C.
Summary: The interviewees in this group interview were students who staged a walkout in 1951 at the all black, segregated Adkin High School in Kinston, North Carolina, to protest unequal conditions. The interviewees describe their family backgrounds, life in segregated Kinston, and Adkin High School. They remember learning that their school was unequal to the all-white school from which they were barred, and planning and staging a school-wide walkout and march without the assistance of any adults. They also discuss their lives since high school.
Moving Images
8 video files of 8 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (153 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0096_mv01-08
Manuscripts
1 transcript (67 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0096_Adkin_High_School_transcript
Cecilia Suyat Marshall oral history interview conducted by Emilye Crosby in Washington, D.C., 2013-06-30.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Cecilia Suyat Marshall, a Filipino born in Hawaii, came to the United States in 1948. She worked as a secretary for the NAACP before marrying civil rights lawyer Thurgood Marshall.
Summary: Cecilia Suyat Marshall recalls moving from Hawaii to New York where she found a job as a secretary with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1948. Marshall notes some of the highlights of her experiences at the NAACP offices, including the organization's victory in the Brown v. Board case, traveling the South with NAACP staff, and attending conferences. There she met the many local people who gave the Civil Rights Movement strength. She left the organization after her marriage to Thurgood Marshall, and with that departure became more of a mother and wife than an activist, but retained her activist spirit with membership on the boards of progressive organizations.
Moving Images
6 video files of 6 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (31 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0097_mv01-03
Manuscripts
1 transcript (20 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0097_Marshall_transcript
D'Army Bailey oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Memphis, Tennessee, 2013-08-13.
Digital content available
Biographical History: D'Army Bailey was a civil rights activist, lawyer, judge, actor and member of the Berkeley, California, city council. He helped found the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee.
Summary: D'Army Bailey describes growing up in Memphis, Tennessee, the influence of the Crump political machine in city politics, and his involvement with the Memphis NAACP at an early age. He talks about his participation in the civil rights activism as a student at Southern University, for which he was ultimately expelled. Bailey describes his move to Clark University in Massachusetts, where he became involved in the Northern Student Movement. After discussing his time spent at Boston University Law School, Bailey talks about a series of jobs he had related to civil rights and legal services, including serving as the director of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council (LSCRRC). Bailey also describes his career in California as a Berkeley City Councilman, his recall from that post, and his subsequent move back to his hometown of Memphis, where he has served as a lawyer, judge, and founder of the National Civil Rights Museum.
Moving Images
14 video files of 14 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (191 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0098_mv01-14
Manuscripts
1 transcript (93 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0098_Bailey_transcript
Kay Tillow oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Louisville, Kentucky, 2013-08-14.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Kay Tillow was a civil rights activist with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and a labor leader of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU).
Summary: Kay Tillow describes learning about the Civil Rights Movement as a student at the University of Illinois, where she got involved with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). She remembers attending the trials of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) workers in Cairo, Illinois, and traveling to Ghana in 1962. When she returned to the United States in 1963 she participated in sit-ins in Atlanta, Georgia, and demonstrations in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. She discusses her work with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 1199, a hospital workers' union, and organizing victories in Pennsylvania. Tillow also discusses her role in the Coalition of Labor Union Women and her current work on health care reform.
Moving Images
5 video files of 5 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (73 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0099_mv01-05
Manuscripts
1 transcript (32 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0099_TillowKay_transcript
John and Jean Rosenberg oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Prestonburg, Kentucky, 2013-08-15.
Digital content available
Biographical History: John Rosenberg was an attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division. He was a prosecutor on the trials for the murders of James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman in Mississippi. He is the founder of AppalReD (Appalachian Research and Defense Fund) in Kentucky.
Biographical History: Jean Rosenberg was a research analyst for the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and the wife of lawyer John Rosenberg.
Summary: Jean and John Rosenberg begin this interview with recollections of their families' backgrounds. Jean learned about social issues as she was raised by a Quaker family in Pennsylvania, and John's family fled Germany under threat from the Nazis. Jean attended Wilmington College and became a research analyst for the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division. John grew up in Gastonia, North Carolina, where FBI agents kept tabs on his family, attended Duke University, served in the Air Force, and attended the University of North Carolina School of Law. He became an attorney with the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division, which became effective after reorganization by John Doar. Much of this interview concerns Jean and John's work with the Civil Rights Division, including support for voter registration efforts in Georgia and Alabama, the investigation of the Hartman Turnbow case, in which a black activist was arrested for an arson attempt on his own home, and an effort to address a murder in Mississippi. John also addresses the effects of the Voting Rights Act in the South, the role of the lawyers in the Civil Rights Division in relation to the FBI and local law enforcement, and a variety of other cases and issues he dealt with. After retirement, the Rosenbergs founded the Appalachian Citizens Law Center.
Moving Images
10 video files of 10 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (157 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0100_mv01-10
Manuscripts
1 transcript (70 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0100_Rosenbergs_transcript
William R. Lawrence oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Roanoke, Virginia, 2013-08-16.
Biographical History: William Lawrence was a long-time employee of the Norfolk and Western Railroad in Roanoke, Virginia.
Summary: William Lawrence describes his long career with the Norfolk and Western Railroad in Roanoke, Virginia. Lawrence was born in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1922 but grew up in Roanoke and worked for the railroad most of his adult life. He discusses conditions of labor, race relations at the workplace, and his experience working as a foreman.
Moving Images
4 video files of 4 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (45 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0101_mv01-04
Manuscripts
1 transcript (33 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0101_Lawrence_transcript
Oliver W. Hill, Jr., oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in Petersburg, Virginia, 2013-08-17.
Digital content available
Biographical History: Oliver W. Hill, Jr., was the soon of civil rights attorney Oliver W. Hill, Sr. He integrated the Richmond, Virginia, public schools as a child and became a professor of psychology.
Summary: Oliver W. Hill, Jr., discusses his father, civil rights lawyer Oliver Hill. He explains his father's childhood and education in Roanoke, Virginia, how he ended up at Howard University in the 1920s, where he was in the same class as Thurgood Marshall and studied law under Charles Hamilton Houston. In the 1930s Hill reunited with both of them to work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, which was focused on challenging segregation laws. Hill describes his own experience as a black student integrating a white school in Richmond, Virginia, attending Howard University, becoming a psychology professor at Virginia State University, and working with Bob Moses on the Algebra Project. He also discusses the education of African American children, school reform, and student testing.
Moving Images
5 video files of 5 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (73 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0102_mv01-05
Manuscripts
1 transcript (37 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0102_Hill_transcript
John Carlos oral history interview conducted by David P. Cline in New York, New York, 2013-08-18.
Digital content available
Biographical History: John Carlos was a member of the American Olympic track team and was the Bronze Medalist at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico, where he protested racism around the world. He later played football in the NFL, and worked as a counselor and track and field coach.
Summary: John Carlos discusses his childhood in Harlem, New York, the changes that he saw in Harlem with the widespread use of heroin and the splintering of families, and describes the disparities in education for black children when he was growing up. He remembers the influence of black leaders including Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Carlos was recruited to run track at East Texas State University, where he experienced racial discrimination and was treated poorly by his coach. He explains his protest at the 1968 Olympics, including the symbols that he and Tommy Smith employed to protest racial discrimination, and he describes the emotional impact that the protest had on him.
Moving Images
9 video files of 9 (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, QuickTime wrapper) (127 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0103_mv01-09
Manuscripts
1 transcript (68 pages)
Digital ID: afc2010039_crhp0103_Carlos_transcript
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