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Louis Milton Ronsheim collection, 1914-2000

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Series I: Manuscripts
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/1Biographical information, 1965-2000
1 folder
MS01: Biographical information compiled by the donor. Consists of published material including newspaper articles, a press release, and a chapter from the book "Notables of Harrison County, Ohio," by Erving Beauregard.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/2Book, 1919
1 folder
MS02: "Italy: what she was, what she is, what she will become," published by the Italian sailors.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/3Book, 1917
1 folder
MS15: "Soldiers' French Course," Gordon-Detwiler Institute of New York.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/4Book, 1917
1 folder
MS16: "Speak French: A Book for soldiers."
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/5Civilian papers, 1921-1939
1 folder
MS20: Red Cross membership card (1935); American Legion membership cards (1921-1936); Ohio driver license (1939).
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/6Clippings, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS03: Weekly letters written by Ronsheim, published in The Cadiz Republican, recounting his experiences in the Army in the United States and in Europe.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/7-9Clippings, 1917-1924
1 folder
MS04: Clippings from various newspapers concerning news of the war, the 332nd Infantry Regiment, homecomings and post-war celebrations and reunions.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2797/1Clippings, April 7, 1918
1 folder
MS34: Cleveland Plain Dealer Woman's Magazine article about the Camp Sherman library.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2777/10Correspondence, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS05: Letters exchanged between Louis Milton Ronsheim, and his wife, Isabel McConnell Ronsheim, who lived in Cadiz, Ohio. Topics covered include: news of daily life; love and affection for each other; sadness at being apart; the veteran's duties; family and friends; financial matters; discussing news from the paper about two men found dead; being needed at home; the area where he is stationed is described as being a very bleak place; discussion of father watching over specific debts at home; he prays all the time to return home; sent a poem entitled “Just as I am” by Charlotte Elliott as comfort to him; weather; discussing yellow fever and how some folks will be sent to France because of it; news of friends and family; description of the intense drilling; food; the company will get to have lockers; obtaining overalls and wool underwear; washing loads of dishes after meals; remembering going fishing together and skipping rocks at home; he went out into the woods near camp for some peace and relished the idea of getting away from war for a while; getting headaches and the pills not doing much good for them; glad to be getting a flashlight for personal use soon; remembering the first night together after being married to help comfort him; talking about an office dance that was full of women and decorated with corn; her work schedule on a typical Saturday; seeing the Captain for the second time today and further describing him as a peach; letting him out with a pass to stay with his wife; being in charge of twelve men who are to shovel and haul coal; the men in the company who have guard duty; writing I love you in specific military signals; thinking of how far he is from home at each stop they make; traveling by train on the B&O railroad; trying to sleep on the small seats in the train cars; doesn’t think that the train ride would be considered romantic; the other men in the company seem to believe that the war will be over by spring; the Camp Sherman football team, all of the ticket proceeds from the games go to the Camp Sherman emergency fund; trying to get warm at night by the stove; the dreadful picture out the window of his tent in the midst of a blizzard; had to wear his helmet in the tent because he was getting covered by snow; eating cold breakfast foods that normally should be eaten hot because they can’t keep anything warm; every man in the unit has some kind of cold; shooting dummy bullets at targets 400 yards away; hitting 22 out of the 25 targets while using rapid fire; asking if she was proud of the fact that he washed his face and hair twice today with soap; feelings about being apart; army life is disagreeable; sleeping quarters littered; sending a blanket because of the cold conditions; worry that he wouldn’t get to keep all the items sent to him; platoon drills; desire to receive letters from home; trying to get a good sleep; not wanting to go to the picture show; new Lt. with gold teeth whom no one likes; too many papers to sign and not enough time to read them before hand; hygiene and doing dishes; getting sick; liberty bonds; leave passes; learning how to shoot a newer make of rifle; the conditions in France are such that there is a lot of schooling needed before heading over there; the general belief that the infantry in the Army is second to none when it comes to training and hard work; trying to stay awake during odd hours with cold towels and Coca-Cola; he explains this is the world’s biggest issue going on; they are sacrificing the most that any person can; his faith in God will help him bear anything; he and others know that peace is almost here; he wants her to write more about herself because that’s the type of news he wants to hear; getting up at 5:15 AM with no reveille; telling her not to worry if she doesn’t hear much from him for a month or so; too much to describe in England and he wants to take his time and write a longer letter later on; beautiful roses and other flowers that her mother would enjoy; cleanest place he’s ever seen, with the houses looking like ones in pictures; their paper claims the largest circulation in the world; telling her that she had better have a shelf ten feet long built for all of the stuff he is going to send home to her; making sure letters are written even when no pen can be found; the feeling of aging more quickly while in the service; at the shooting range; someone walked off with his gun; after effects of vaccination; Christmas plans; feeling that he belongs home and not overseas; trouble getting letters mailed from certain locations; admiration for the look of the English houses; the English people looked their part, and talked it too; the sacrifice is the price of a more beautiful time coming; weekend passes denied at Camp Sherman; talking about family members visiting while he is overseas; if caught his name is Buck Private; camping out in a horse stall writing his letters; most exciting guard duty of his army existence; keeping guard from an abandoned house; got a surprise letter from her containing lots of news from home; having plenty of money still; wanting to buy a watch because they are cheaper there; Corporals get paid about $40.50, which means he gets about $19.50; taking a cold creek bath and washing his duds; his wife telling a story of their harsh eleven mile hike up steep mountains; he likes guard duty the most because he can sit and be with his wife through her letters; thinking about being apart on their anniversary for the first time; reading a lot of newspapers from around the area; mosquitos and other insects; telling jokes with all of the other guys in the company; ideas for a poster design showcasing Europe and its grandeur; telling his wife that someone told him that it was worth the trip to Italy to see the sunsets, which are very grand and vivid; admiring the castles in Italy (he says there seems to be one everywhere they go); the Sunday sermon that day that Dr. Smith gave and how it helps reassure/comfort her to live right and she will be rewarded; threw his first live grenade out in the field; having trouble getting today’s letter mailed out; sending all of the photographs that he has taken to his wife, for fear that he might lose them somehow; on guard duty all night and closed his eyes to dream about his wife to pass the time; rather go to jail first than to carry the packs one more mile; saw the famous spires of the Milan cathedral from a distance; going to see the castle at Valeggio; wants to see Venice and Rome as much as any other place in Europe; saw a great air battle with planes being shot down in flames; gloomy and rainy in Cadiz; the Marines are supposed to relieve his company very soon; having a regular turkey dinner, guessing his wife didn’t have turkey twice a day for the holidays; ordered an official set of thirty-nine war photos, which are 5x6 and utterly gruesome to look at; word is that they are hoping to leave by the 15th; false hopes in getting home this month, but he explains that’s what they were told; describing the environment at the Vatican, with the 16th century sculptures and architecture; St. Peter’s is the finest looking church in the world, with 236 statues of various bishops and saints; wanting to visit the Sistine Chapel, but it was closed, and a bribe to the guard didn’t work; missing out on going to the picture gallery as well; Soldier accidentally discharging his revolver, taking a hunk out of a wall; seeing ancient castles and artwork; military ceremony; exchanging currency while overseas; going to the dentist to get a silver filling put in; discussing the types of food he wishes he could have from home; seeing an aviator fly in circles in the air; sending items back home; drilling in the extreme heat; getting his regular evening drink, one specific to the area; Col. Wallace wants them to make a name for themselves, like the rough riders; freezing in the “ditch”; describing the weapons he used and encountered; learning how to use the weapons of the enemy; getting his pictures he took all mixed up and trying to straighten them out; talking about boys from his hometown who are now overseas; Christmas letter from sister at home discussing her grades in school; soldiers going on relief work and detail work; Colonel Wallace sent for ships; 332nd regiment duties; cancellation of moving to land; getting shoulder decorations as a soldier in combat; being dissatisfied with military life; missing Isabel, music, family; chasing a man who stole flour; guessing where he will be moved next; coming back home no later than March; Isabel’s co-worker Harriet replacing Frances Cox; talking to a child about their father also stationed in Italy; writing on a streetcar; Milton’s stoic tone of writing; questioning about money orders sent to him; talking to police about stolen goods; sorry about sickness; visiting with Mrs. Smith; sending a check in the mail; shopping; hates watching for thieves; caught someone stealing flour; massive presence of U.S. war boats in Italian harbor; curiosity about peace treaties; almost two years of marriage; bad haircuts in Italy; Ehrhart apartments; seeing a movie and wanting to go to shows with Isabel; Valentine card with red, white and blue ribbon, being each other’s valentines for years to come; going out with librarians; missing him just as much after two years; wonderful books the library has; receiving a handkerchief; sending hats to him; sleeping in; listening to a lecture; Roman bath house and vapor bath tickets; going to doctor; weighs 150 lbs.; new English ribbed socks; Italian shoes aren’t as good as American shoes; destroyer carried a California actor named Buck Freeman; suspicion of a spy; might be discharged from New York; asks if Isabel wants to meet him in New York; soldier brothers who hadn’t seen each other for seven years; meeting a man named Stohl from Piedmont who knows people in Cadiz; food on the boat; making milk toast; slaughter and serving beef rare; coming home on March 4th; might come back on the Guiseppi Verdi boat; men who visited Vienna in his Regiment went through Royal Palace; flour and food rations, starving people in Vienna; railroad strike is holding up delivery of flour; he has Gold Medal flour; sympathy with a Czech man from Bohemia who needs food; thinks Serbians need more food; doesn’t want America to be involved in European matters; working in the library; study stories for story hour; a dream she had about her father being pleased with Milton; sick babies; going to a show with Alice and Harriet; working with a Belgian-American in the library; many soldiers in town; news she hears in the Gazette Times about soldiers returning home; missing letters; Theodore Roosevelt’s death; “Fortitude” book; “Prelude to Adventure” book; “The Duchess of Wrexe” book; “The Luen Minor” book; future babies; cafeteria at work; story time with children; Colonel Bishop; lunch date; talking to a friend about Ohio State University law school; picking out pajamas made by the Rockford Illinois chapter; almond bars from Croce Rossa; killing rats and mice; no more relief work in France; a suspected spy; revolting eating area; food- jam crackers and cigarettes, cookies; Oregonian boat; sending other soldiers home from France but not him; his belongings; finishing pictures; reading for happiness; requesting Isabel not to call herself names; violet flowers; coldest day of winter; ears tingled and wind blew hard; learning French; taking pictures of country; getting another camera; Italian soldiers and draft board; studying the country; local historical club; breakfast and morning schedule; “Golden Buttons” poem for Isabel; getting his picture taken and plate looks good; soldiers going to Genoa to prepare going back home; coming home looks rosy; hopes to leave later in the week; a general strike to begin in sympathy with railroad strike; doesn’t think he’ll be a treated as a strike breaker; getting delayed in Genoa; general strike is on; no work no electrical power; wants to write an article about the lifespan of the strike; sending a pajama picture of men to Illinois; his destroyer is the Lansdale; describing the crow’s nest on the ship; finding and helping a little homeless boy out from the cold; Lieutenant David C. Bunt of Battle Creek, Michigan; red cross nurse; coffee pot; strike is off; railroad men got raise; cooking with lard; 3rd battalion leaves tomorrow; his photograph; Italian service; wanting to buy things for her; poverty in Italy and France; receiving letters; chocolate; his return date; dreams of him; photographs he sent; League of Nations article; savings in bank; lunch with librarians and Miss Fisher; work piling up; Ritterhouse for dinner with Harriet and Alice; she’s in Pittsburgh; grapefruit breakfast; her period; party for Agnes Wheeler; “Nothing But Lies”; library school; baked ham dinner; church; reading his letters to her; valentine’s letters; creating a home together; officers can’t get paychecks cashed; cars with USA markings; horse meat disguised as pork; French eat plain lard and raw bacon; Italian soldier eating salt; soldiers with no gloves; Russia; staying fit; taking medicine; getting a massage; lifting 100 lb. dumbbells, working out; Golden themed poem for Isabel; Silver Lake and Akron Ohio shack of an Italian organ grinder; writing his biography; billiards; chess; “unfit for publication” writing about: banning of clothing without sleeves like capes because they are a symbol of thieves; Sherlock Holmes; League of Nations should abolish capes; stolen fashion; bandana handkerchief caps and burlap sacks; soldiers showing off scars and wounds; being a guard; vivid dream of Milton; in Pittsburgh; meeting with friends; pleasing her new friends; leaving Pittsburgh; missing Milton dearly; Victory Girls; thieves who stole lard; Trieste, Italy; shipment of flour; strike is still on; played ball with natives; sergeant from Columbus, Ohio; wants to be rich and buy things for her – clothing; Czech representatives looking after their flour and meat; Italian alpine troops; Prague rebuilding their city; free college opportunity; Italian soldiers killed and hurt; Genoa; getting packages through Sicily; lieutenant committed suicide; dental work and lack of dentists; looking through periodicals for information about Italian ships coming from France; “The New Rip” magazine; critique of France being distrustful; League of Nations; praise of England; Howard Potts; critique of Germany; her author friend Miss Smith; librarian friend from Goucher College in Baltimore; Woods’ Hall; education; wax figures of mythological characters; Chicago Grand Opera; “The Barber Seville”; Vatican; hard getting up; rainy days; started on a written work; new boat Cape Lookout; horses on the boat; French gold chevron fashion; The Celtic mother ship; boat in Naples taking troops home; begging for bread; white gloves for Isabel made in Vienna before war; coming home; watching dance with girlfriends; reading his letters aloud to her parents and withholding romantic sentiments; all American troops in Italy out by February 15, 1919; pictures he sent home; being in local newspaper; bipartisan League of Nations paper stance; bigoted Republicans; The Gazette Times is partisan; writing Victory Girl notices; renting a house; New Era movement; trip home delayed; 75,000 tons of food delivered; ships West Lashaway, West Elcasco, Western Scout, Sudbury, Westerner, Oregonian and the Cape Lookout; Slavic theater, drama, no laughing allowed; billiards; military clothing; getting in a fight; working on the USS Oregonian; getting frustrated with delays coming home; difficulty with railroad transportation; 332nd regiment; Colonel Wallace in Genoa; Cadillac; plans to travel through Naples, Rome, Florence and Milan; schedule of his shipment home; praying for Milton, praying for the League of Nations and the Peace Conference; “we all would be without prejudice”; comparing soldier records with draft board records; her father delivering a speech about soldier records at Associated Press meeting; scrapbooking; the flu at home and abroad; 308th, 83rd, 332nd infantry units coming home; Aunt Bertie, Aunt Emma; leaving Trieste; Guisseppi Verdi ship; sightseeing in Italy; Italian airships demonstration; seeing the Pope describing him as small and feeble; collecting photographs; having cramps; second honeymoon; coming home on the last boat; sewing and housework; Lost Battalion; considering a discharge; gruesome photos; going to the dentist; communism overtaking Hungary; Milton’s battalion being sent back because of uprising in Hungary; making table cloth and napkins.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2778/1-6Correspondence, 1917-1919
6 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2779/1-7Correspondence, 1917-1919
7 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2780/1-7Correspondence, 1917-1919
7 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2781/1-6Correspondence, 1917-1919
6 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2782/1-5Correspondence, 1917-1919
5 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER OVZ251/1Correspondence, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER OVZ329/1Correspondence, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS05 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2782/6Correspondence, 1916-1919
1 folder
MS06: Correspondence between Ronsheim and his parents, Samuel Ronsheim and Catherine Stamm Ronsheim, who lived in Anderson, Indiana. Also included are several letters from the veteran's wife, Isabel, to his parents. Topics covered include: daily activities; news of friends; thoughts on growing older; early days in the Army; clothing; duties; training; food; Isabel's work as a librarian; travel to Europe and thoughts on going to war; impressions of Europe; photographs; mail; recreation.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2783/1-6Correspondence, 1916-1919
6 folders
MS06 continued
BOX-FOLDER OVZ288/1Correspondence, 1916-1919
1 folder
MS06 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2797/2Correspondence, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS35: Additional correspondence between Milton and Isabel Ronsheim, and Milton's parents, Simon Ronsheim and Catherine Stamm Ronsheim.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2784/1-2Correspondence, 1917-1919
2 folders
MS07: Letters between the veteran and his wife, Isabel, and Isabel's family, primarily her parents, Mr. & Mrs. Harry B. McConnell, of Cadiz, Ohio. Topics covered include: Harry McConnell's work as proprietor of the Cadiz Republican; Isabel's work as a librarian; Milton's training; postcards from Italy.
BOX-FOLDER OVZ329/2Correspondence, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS07 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2784/3-7Correspondence, 1916-1941
2 folders
MS08: Letters between Ronsheim and various correspondents including Ronsheim's brother, Edward; other family; Members of Congress; fellow veterans. Topics covered include: news of the veteran's family; thoughts on the quality of YMCA services; formation of an American Legion post; reunion activities; bonuses for World War I veterans; distributing photograph collections to fellow veterans; Ronsheim's collecting of envelopes sent by the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF).
BOX-FOLDER OVZ251/2Correspondence, 1916-1941
1 folder
MS08 continued
BOX-FOLDER OVZ329/3Correspondence, 1916-1941
1 folder
MS08 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2797/3Correspondence, 1917-1918
1 folder
MS37: Additional correspondence to Milton Ronsheim from friends and family.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/1-2Correspondence, 1917-1919
2 folders
MS09: Letters to the veteran's wife, Isabel Ronsheim, from friends, family and colleagues. Topics covered include: work as a librarian; news of Milton; news of her cousin, Allen Scott, who served in France; daily life of military wives.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2797/3Correspondence, July 10, 1917
1 folder
MS36: Correspondence to Isabel Ronsheim from her sister-in-law, Helen.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/3Correspondence, 1917-1919
1 folder
MS10: Miscellaneous correspondence. Includes letters from members of Milton and Isabel Ronsheim's families, and a letter to the editor of the Cadiz Republican. Also included are several empty envelopes.
BOX-FOLDER OVZ329/4Creative works, 1918
1 folder
MS11: Poem, "The U.S. Volunteer," by Charles A. Stonebraker (02/02/1918).
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/4Creative works, 1919
1 folder
MS12: Poem, "Golden Buttons," by Ronsheim (02/08/1919).
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/5Diaries and journals, 1918-1919
1 folder
MS13: Pocket-sized notebook containing brief notes about daily activities, locations.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/6Diaries and journals, 1918-1919
1 folder
MS14: Notepad containing notes, lists of names, and a story titled "Unfit for Service: A True record of the short life of Walter Noble (Jerry Allen) as a private in Company L, 332nd Reg. Inf. U.S.N.A. at Camp Sherman, O., Sept. 21, 1917 - Jan. 1918."
BOX-FOLDER MSS2797/4Diaries and journals, 1918
1 folder
MS38: Bound volume in which the veteran hand-copied the diary of fellow soldier Richard J. (Dick) Morris, of Lisbon, Ohio.
BOX-FOLDER OVZ288/1Maps, undated
1 folder
MS17: Map of Italy.
BOX-FOLDER OVZ236/1Maps, 1960
1 folder
MS18: France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, annotated with the veteran's route through Europe.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/7Maps, 1917
1 folder
MS19: Rand-McNally War Map of the Italian Front.
BOX-FOLDER OVZ329/5Memoirs, 1914-1925
1 folder
MS20: Brief remembrances by Ronsheim, written for various purposes. Some appear to have been written for publication, speeches, or as part of letters home. Topics covered include: health; music; Italian antiquities; rumors; the end of the war; the YMCA.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2797/5Memoirs, undated
1 folder
MS39: Brief remembrances by Ronsheim that appear to be drafts of pieces written for publication.
BOX-FOLDER MSS2785/8-9Military papers, 1917-1920
2 folders
MS21: Draft board forms and correspondence; company rosters; passes; rules of conduct; training records; medical records.
BOX-FOLDER OVZ329/6Military papers, 1917-1920
1 folder
MS21 continued
BOX-FOLDER MSS2786/1Periodicals, January 1918
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