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Personal Narratives of Evacuation and Relocation of Japanese Americans During World War II, 1924-2018

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Series I: Internees (continued)
George Mazumi Taoka Collection
Collection ID: 35055
Digital content available
Taoka was interned at Santa Anita Assemby Center (Santa Anita Racetrack), California, and Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming. In May 1944, he enlisted in the United States Army, and served in the Pacific Theater with the Allied Translator and Interpreter Service (ATIS). Following World War II, he continued to serve in the Army Reserve, retiring in 1976, with the rank of Major.
BOX audio cassette Audio Interview with George Mazumi Taoka, January 5, 2006
50 minutes
SR01: Topics covered include: returning to Japan; Stanford University; 1941 research in Japan; interview with Japanese secret police in Japan; interview with Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in United States 5/1941; Pearl Harbor attack; hysteria toward Japanese in the United States; relocation of Japanese from West Coast; marriage; relocation to Santa Anita Assemby Center (Santa Anita Racetrack), California; shipped to internment camp 9/1942, Heart Mountain Relocation Center; release from camp; University of Toledo; draft number, enlistment 5/1944; racial issues, Aniston, Alabama, Fort McClellan; Philippines, Manila, Japanese resentment; Japan, post-war occupation duty; visit family in Hiroshima; discharge; post-war, graduate school, Columbia.
Jack Taoashi Tashiro Collection
Collection ID: 27114
Digital content available
Tashiro was interned at Tule Lake Relocation Center, California, as a teenager, before being drafted into the United States Army in 1944. He served at the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS) and with the Allied Translator and Interpreter Service (ATIS), at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and in Tokyo, Japan. He was interviewed jointly with his wife, Marie Tashiro, who was interned at Poston Relocation Center, Arizona.
BOX miniDV Video Interview with Jack Taoashi Tashiro and Marie Tashiro, February 22, 2004
70 minutes
MV01-MV02: Topics covered include: father came to the United States in 1898; returned to Japan to get married; settled in Portland, Oregon; father died in 1937; mother took Tashiro back to Japan for school; returned to Portland in 1939; was playing baseball when Pearl Harbor was attacked; attended Japanese school; participated in kendo; sent to Tule Lake Relocation Center; worked on farms in eastern Oregon during the summers; mother sent to Minidoka Relocation Center, Idaho; drafted in November 1944; trained at Camp Blanding; sent to Fort Snelling, Minnesota, Military Intelligence Language School (MISLS); sent to Tokyo on August 3, 1946; took part in War Crimes trials; assigned to Fukuoka for one year; discharged in January 1947; attended University of Oregon; met wife in Minneapolis in 1946; job offer from the CIA; job with Office of Technical Services; secret writing and clandestine photography; assigned to Japan for four years; worked in Vietnam learning how to identify Viet Cong; Deputy Director of Office of Technical Services; retired in 1979 and opened his own security firm; occupation of Japan vs. Iraq War.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-2744 Transcript, February 22, 2004
1 folder
MS01: Transcript of MV01-MV02.
Yasu Teramura collection
Collection ID: 96325
Digital content available
Teramura was interned at the Portland Assembly Center, but was released to work for the Farm Security Administration in Eastern Oregon, while his family was moved to Minidoka Relocation Center, Idaho. In 1944, he was drafted into the United States Army, and served as a cook with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team in France and Italy. After his discharge, he returned to Oregon and a career as a farmer.
BOX CDDVD-373 Video Interview with Yasu Teramura, February 20, 2014
55 minutes
MV01: Topics covered include: served in Army from September 1944 until discharged in December 1946; born in Portland, Oregon, in 1922; Japanese Ambassador Nomura trip on December 5, 1941; Teramura lived across from the editor of The Oregon Journal; Mrs. Jackson called him to meet the ambassador; remembers discussion with Nomura; days later, heard about Pearl Harbor; attended trade school in Portland for diesel-electric engineering; graduated February 1942; professor worked at Kaiser Shipyards; professor initially invited Teramura to work at Kaiser, but because he was Japanese he was not allowed to work there; returned home and helped father on farm until family was evacuated on May 10, 1942; went to Portland Assembly Center for six or seven days; restricted areas in Oregon based on Cascades; went to Eastern Oregon on May 15, 1942 to work for farmers through ASC (Amalgamated Sugar Company) with two other families; worked with Kino Saito (?); worked in beet fields; then worked at a company based in Wilder with a farm in Brogan; returned to Camp until December 31, 1942; on January 1, 1943 went to work for Mark Zameda (?) for a year; January 1, 1944 moved to farm labor camp in Caldwell; another job until drafted in July 1944; physical examination in Boise, Idaho; September 1, 1944 inducted in Army; sent to Fort Douglas, Utah; transferred to Camp Blanding, Florida for basic training; stationed at Fort Mead, Maryland; shipped overseas in March 1945; all-Japanese company at Camp Blanding, roughly 150 people; learned to fire 57-millimeter anti-tank gun; physical shape; visited parents in Minidoka between Camp Blanding and Fort Mead; went to holding place in New York; 39 ship convoy to Le Havre, France; trip description; disembarked at nighttime; took the train to Marseille where the 442nd Regimental Combat Team had recently fought in the Battle of the Bulge; attached to the 88th Black Battalion, 34th Division, 92nd Division; sent to Leghorn (Livorno), Italy in October; PFC at that time; description of tents; rations; spent most of his time abroad in Leghorn; discussion of photographs; physical fitness; towards end of war, assignment processing Germans, confiscating guns, delousing with DDT; was part of F Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team; 442nd Regimental Combat Team disbanded in June 1946; signed up for 232nd Engineers; became company head cook in July 1945; friend who was discharged told him to take over cooking; witnessed someone being shot in Leghorn kitchen; kept 45 in pocket; had to dispose of body; refused to be sergeant rather than T5; no one asked for MOS for him to be a cook; daily schedule and cooking tasks; learned to bake from German prisoner; five prisoners did kitchen work; type of food they served; 232nd was not Japanese-only; head chlorinator of water then guard duty then motor pool; trained "colored" companies; perceptions of those troops; discharged in October of 1946; on ship from Leghorn to New York; then to Fort Mead to wait for discharge; train to Fort Lewis, Washington; $300 to travel home; went to sister in Portland; train to Ontario, Oregon; March 1947 goes to work for brother's farm in Ontario; 1948 rented piece of ground to farm sugar beets, onions, lettuce, celery; married in 1951; five children, one killed, one son and three daughters; did not use GI Bill; in 1975 borrowed $10,000 when hail hurt farm; picture of friend and fellow veteran at 442nd Regimental Combat Team memorial in Los Angeles; photo album; little contact with 442nd Regimental Combat Team friends; one friend in Honolulu; gained experience in the Army; truck license; wanted to go to France; regrets not going to Germany to see liberation; "blood on the sand is all red" (Reagan); dislike of prejudice.
Walter Takeo Tsukamoto Collection
Collection ID: 10657
Digital content available
Tsukamoto was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, United States Army Reserve in 1926. At the outbreak of World War II, he requested a transfer to active duty, but was repeatedly denied. He and his family were interned at Sacramento Assembly Center (a.k.a. Walerga Assembly Center), California, and Tule Lake Relocation Center, California, until February 1943. In March 1943, Tsukamoto received orders to report for active duty. He served with the United States Army Judge Advocate General Corps at Camp Savage, Minnesota, and following the end of World War II, served in Japan, San Francisco, California, Korea, and Heidelberg, Germany. He served until his death in 1961. His daughter and son-in-law were interviewed on his behalf.
BOX miniDV Video Interview with Dorie Tsukamoto and Charles Kobayashi, October 20, 2003
60 minutes
MV01-MV02: Topics covered include: working as a civil rights advocate before the war; Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at the University of California, Berkeley; receiving appointment as Judge Advocate General (JAG) in the United States Army, first Japanese American to be employed as such; anti-Japanese sentiment in America; rejected for military after Pearl Harbor; evacuation and internment of Japanese Americans; released from Tule Lake Relocation Center, California, to go onto active duty; assigned to Germany; recognized as one of the nine best JAGs in the Army and promoted to full colonel.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-482/1 Biography, undated
MS01: Topics covered include: Childhood; ROTC at the University of California, Berkeley; first Japanese American to receive commission from Berkeley; working for the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL); offered appointment as Judge Advocate General in United States Army; attempt to apply for active service in the Army was denied; curfew imposed on Japanese Americans; family placed in internment camp; abuse in the camps; left internment camp to serve in the Army; Camp Savage, Minnesota; presiding over cases during the Korean War; promoted to colonel.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-482/2 Transcript, undated
MS02: Transcript of MV01-MV02.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-482/3 Photograph, 1904-1962
PH01: Tsukamoto's parents posing with mayor of family's hometown (1904).
PH02: Tsukamoto as a teenager (1922).
PH03: Tsukamoto upon receiving commission as a Second Lieutenant, United States Army Reserve (1926).
PH04: Tsukamoto during a visit with family while on furlough (1944).
PH05: Tsukamoto at Camp Savage, Minnesota (1943).
PH07: Tsukamoto with wife and children, Sacramento, California (1939).
PH08: Group photo of Judge Advocate General's Corps officers, Tsukamoto is second from left.
PH09: Plaque in remembrance of Tsukamoto at entrance to the Presidio in San Francisco (1962).
Mack F. Tsujimoto Collection
Collection ID: 71923
Digital content available
Tsujimoto was interned at Tule Lake Relocation Center, California, where he worked as a surgical assistant in the camp hospital. After being cleared by the FBI, he was released from Tule Lake and went to work at Women's Medical College Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1944, he was drafted into the Army and trained with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team Replacement Unit. But due to flat feet, he was transferred to the Army Air Forces, and served in Colorado, the Philippines, and Japan. He was released from active duty in 1946, and served in the Air Force Reserve until 1954.
BOX CDDVD-184 Video Interview with Mack F. Tsujimoto, May 26, 2010
48 minutes
MV01: Topics covered include: early years on farm; high school; three brothers and one sister; in State Guard when war started; unit sent to San Francisco, California, but he was sick that day, and didn't join them, later told by his commander that he was safer where he was; sent to Tule Lake Relocation Center, California, with family; worked as surgical assistant at hospital; FBI cleared him to work outside the camp; job at Women's Medical College Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; drafted in 1944; sent from Colorado to Florida; trained in 442nd Regimental Combat Team Replacement Unit; flat feet, rejected; sent to Army Air Corps in Texas; overseas to South Pacific with Medical Group; stationed in the Philippines (6/1945); assigned to air base near Tokyo, Japan (10/1945); still heavy fighting, lost supply ship to submarine attack; family was ok, did not write; brother in 442nd Regimental Combat Team; end of war, Japanese soldier stole their food; translating for commander; sent to Colorado with commander; discharged; served in reserve until 1954; joined parents as tenant farmers; bought pear ranch; inspector with California Department of Agriculture; married in 1948; joined American Legion and served as commander.
Warren Michio Tsuneishi Collection
Collection ID: 2153
Digital content available
Tsuneishi was interned at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming, before enlisting in the United States Army in 1943. He served as a translator with 306th Headquarters Intelligence Detachment, XXIV Corps, in the Pacific Theater during World War II.
BOX VHS-24 Video Interview with Warren Michio Tsuneishi, July 2, 2002
82 minutes
MV01-MV02: raw footage of interview with Tsuneishi. MV01 is the camera view of the interviewers.
BOX VHS-24 Video Interview with Warren Michio Tsuneishi, July 2, 2002
82 minutes
MV03: Topics covered include: born in California to Japanese parents; internment in 1942 at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming; businessmen lost everything, economic disaster; comparison to Dachau; University of California; War Relocation Authority; working on farms in Idaho; Heart Mountain Relocation Center; correspondence with outside; elementary school; sister was teacher; father had carried books, donated to school; bachelors in dormitories; loss of liberty was depressing; last $15 lost in poker game; orderly in hospital in Wyoming; brother Arthur worked as draftsman in Chicago; Syracuse University; feeling American at heart; Boy Scout duty; resisted learning Japanese; dual citizenship but one national loyalty; renounced Japanese citizenship; volunteered for Army service in 1943; Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS); Hawaii, National Guard; volunteers for Japanese language specialists; brother at Camp Savage; six month total immersion course to learn Japanese; classified as translator; infantry basic training; visited parents at Heart Mountain; guards at gate wearing same uniform; Japanese mother’s mixed feelings about outcome of war; International Red Cross to check on well-being; father’s haikus; views as Japanese American unchanged; job as translator, translating documents; Camotes Islands under fire; Okinawa friendly fire; assigned bodyguards to protect from own forces; non-commissioned officer (NCO); brother in field artillery; government two-headed policy; parents released from internment; best years of my life; message: “never give up hope”; never lost sight of promise of equality in Gettysburg address, in Constitution, Franklin Roosevelt’s promise; America is nation in process of living up to its dreams; Ceremony of Reconciliation; draft resisters contested relocation; draft resisters vilified and ostracized; wounds festered; essay contest for DAR; USS Maine inscription of nine Japanese casualties.
BOX audio cassette Audio Interview with Warren Michio Tsuneishi, September 30, 2003
103 minutes
SR01-SR02: Topics covered include: born in California to Japanese parents; father a farmer, then became Christian missionary in the United States, born in Japan, immigrated to the United States in 1907; mother was a school teacher in Japan; Tsuneishi was one of ten children (nine survived: six boys and three girls); internment in 1942 at Heart Mountain, Wyoming; businessmen lost everything, economic disaster; “Take only what you can carry” policy; comparison to concentration camp; comparison to how Muslim-Americans are treated in the United States today; University of California; War Relocation Authority; working on farms in Idaho; Heart Mountain Relocation Center; correspondence with people outside the camp; elementary school; sister was teacher; father had carried books, donated to school; bachelors in dormitories; loss of liberty depressing; last $15 lost in poker game; orderly in hospital in Wyoming; brother Arthur worked as draftsman in Chicago; Syracuse University; feeling American at heart; Boy Scout duty; resisted learning Japanese; dual citizenship but one national loyalty; renounced Japanese citizenship (philosophy of Japan that all are Japanese no matter where you are born compared to United States policy of birthright citizenship); did not have official Japanese citizenship but felt obligated to renounce; to further education, volunteered for Army service, 1943; Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS); Hawaii, National Guard; volunteered for Japanese language specialists; older brother drafted in November 1941; sent to old Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp outside of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Camp Savage; six month total immersion course to learn Japanese; classified as translator; Infantry basic training; visited parents at Heart Mountain; guards at gate wearing same uniform; Japanese mother’s mixed feelings about outcome of war; International Red Cross to check on well-being; father’s haikus; views as Japanese American unchanged; details job as translator, translating Japanese classified military documents; Camotes Islands under fire; Okinawa friendly fire; took some Japanese prisoners of war (POWs); facing Japanese soldiers; experience details how he felt.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-179/1 Biographical information, June 30, 2002
1 folder
MS01: Tsuneishi's Curriculum Vitae.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-179/2 Military papers, January 24, 1946
1 folder
MS02: Discharge form and certificate.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-179/3 Printed Matter, 1995-2003
1 folder
MS03: Excerpt from "MIS in the War Against Japan: Personal Experiences Related at the 1993 MIS Capital Reunion, 'The Nisei Veteran: An American Patriot'," edited by Stanley L. Falk and Warren M. Tsuneishi (1995); "Nisei Soldiers in the War Against Japan," by Stanley L. Falk, printed in 2003 by the Japanese American Veterans Association.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-2580/1 Transcript, July 2, 2002
1 folder
Transcript of MV03
BOX-FOLDER MSS-2580/2 Transcript, September 30, 2003
1 folder
Transcript of SR01-SR02
BOX-FOLDER MSS-179/4 Photographs, 1942-1943
1 folder
PH01: Tsuneishi (left) and a buddy from the Philippines, seated with tents and palm trees in background, Philippines, 1944.
PH02: Tsuneishi's mother and a friend holding service flags, each with four stars representing four sons in service, Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming [1942-1943].
PH03: A soldier standing outside a United Service Organizations (USO) building at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming (1942-1943).
PH04: Two of Tsuneishi's colleagues at the Army Military Intelligence Service Language School, Camp Savage, Minnesota.
BOX CD/DVD-2 Computer file, 2004
1 optical disc
CF01: Electronic files of photographs PH01-PH04.
George Minoru Wakiji Collection
Collection ID: 27117
Digital content available
Wakiji was interned at Santa Anita Assembly Center (Santa Anita Racetrack), California, and Gila River Relocation Center, Arizona, as a teenager. His family was released in July 1945. In 1950, he was drafted into the United States Army and served with H Company, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, at Fort Ord, California, and Chorwon, Korea. Following his service, he studied journalism, and later served in the Peace Corps in the Kingdom of Tonga.
BOX miniDV Video Interview with George Minoru Wakiji, May 13, 2004
102 minutes
MV01-MV02: Topics covered include: parents from Wakayama Prefecture; father came to United States for economic reasons; worked on railroad construction and nursery in Pasadena; started his own nursery business; mother came to United States in 1910; grew up in predominantly white neighborhood; attended Japanese language school; shocked by attack on Pearl Harbor; looked at evacuation/relocation as adventure at age 13; evacuated with family to Santa Anita Assembly Center (Santa Anita Racetrack), California; slept in temporary barracks; father lost nursery; catching up on education due to poor schools in camp; family left internment camp in July 1945; brother drafted and sent to Fort Snelling; drafted for Korea; basic training at Fort Ord, California; treated equally; leadership school; managed the football team; shipped to Japan and then Korea; assigned to 1st Cavalry Division; deployed near the DMZ; he looked like the enemy; recreation in Korea; went to Japan in 1952 for R&R; visited grandmother and relatives in Wakayama Prefecture; desegregation; two or three soldiers in his unit were illiterate; combat experiences; used GI Bill for education; returned to Pasadena; joined the Peace Corps after college; director for the Kingdom of Tonga; went to journalism school; 442nd Regimental Combat Team and Military Intelligence Service (MIS) proved the loyalty of Japanese Americans; executive director of the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation; Civil Liberties Act of 1988; President Gerald Ford's rescinding Executive Order 9066.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-887/1 Memoirs, undated
1 folder
MS01: Four-page memoir entitled, "Biography of George M. Wakiji."
BOX-FOLDER MSS-887/2 Military papers, September 16, 1952
1 folder
MS02: DD-214; Discharge Certificate
BOX-FOLDER MSS2674/1 Transcript, May 13, 2004
1 folder
MS03: Transcript of interview (MV01-MV02).
Jack Shuzo Yamabe collection
Collection ID: 30310
Digital content available
Yamabe was interned at Santa Anita Assembly Center (Santa Anita Racetrack), California, and Rohwer Relocation Center, Arkansas, as a young man. In 1944, he was drafted into the United States Army, and served as a translator in Japan.
BOX miniDV Video Interview with Jack Shuzo Yamabe, July 18, 2005
18 minutes
MV01: Topics include: born in Hollywood, California; growing up in poor family; 21 years old during his stay in internment camp; family didn’t lose land and/or business like a lot of Japanese; father was a WWI veteran; drafted in the Army in 1944 while he was living in Chicago, Illinois; interned at Santa Anita Assembly Center (Santa Anita Racetrack), California, facility prior to being sent to Rohwer Relocation Center, Arkansas; working as a truck driver prior to moving into the internment camp; dealing with racism; acceptance of Jewish community; viewing time stationed in Japan as a vacation since there were better translators residing there than veteran; helping with the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFE) in Japan; soldiers playing pranks on each other; getting the measles right before the Battle of the Bulge campaign; seeing General Douglas MacArthur frequently in Japan; working on taxis in Chicago, Illinois after the war; marrying his wife Sumi before military service; daughter and two grandchildren; becoming a teacher; regret of not having combat experience.
BOX-FOLDER MSS-973 Photograph, 2005
1 folder
PH01: Contemporary photo of Yamabe.
BOX CDDVD-23 Computer File, July 18, 2005
1 optical disc
CF01: Contains photograph (PH01) in JPEG format.
Frank Takaji Yamamoto Collection
Collection ID: 85536
Digital content available
Yamamoto was interned at Manzanar Relocation Center, California, before being released and relocated to inland California in June 1943. He was drafted into the United States Army in May 1944, and after training at Fort McClellan, Alabama, attended the Military Intelligence Service Language School and served as a Japanese language instructor at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. While serving with the Military Intelligence Service in Tokyo, Japan, and Manila, Philippines, his duties included serving as an interpreter and translator during war crimes trials. He served in the Army Reserve from 1947-1968, and worked in civil service positions with Legal Section, Supreme Commander for Allied Powers, 500th Military Intelligence Group, United States Civil Service Administration of Ryukyu Islands, NISO Japan, and NISO Treasure Island, 12th Naval District.
BOX Hi-8 Video Interview with Frank Takaji Yamamoto, July 8, 2012
62 minutes
MV01: Topics covered include: family members that served in the military; knowledge of activities leading up to United States involvement in World War II; evacuation to the Manzanar Relocation Center, California; living conditions at Manzanar; sentiments about being interned; how he coped with time in the internment camp; release from camp and relocation to inland California in June 1943; education prior to service; work experience prior to military; family's reaction to being drafted; basic training at Fort McClellan, Alabama; duties and instruction received during basic training; treatment as a Japanese American soldier during basic training; how he coped during basic training; most difficult thing about basic training; living conditions and food while in basic training; sent to Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS) for training at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, in 1944; treatment as Japanese American soldier at Fort Snelling; classes other than language taken at Fort Snelling; assigned as Japanese language instructor at Fort Snelling in 1945; felt he was respected while an instructor; living conditions; most difficult thing about being an instructor; morale; opinions of fellow soldiers and superiors while at Fort Snelling; felt the language and military intelligence training was very good; sent to Tokyo, Japan, in April 1946; military specialty as a linguist; feelings and preparedness for assignment in the Pacific; no apprehension as a Japanese American serving in the Pacific; assigned to Manila, Philippines in May 1946; mission of military intelligence in Manila; feelings upon arrival in Philippines; duties in Manila as an interpreter and interrogator during the war crimes trials; methods used to interrogate Japanese Prisoners of War (POW); surprised reaction of prisoners of war (POWs) at his being a Japanese American soldier; duty to witness punishment and execution of Japanese prisoners of war (POWs); living conditions in Manila; felt he should have received additional training to live through the monsoons and bad weather conditions in Manila; poor morale while assigned in Manila due to bad weather; difficulties while assigned in Manila; next assigned to the Interpretive Services Headquarters in Tokyo in 1947; Team Captain in the Interpretive Services; Congressional Gold Medal; discharged from service on November 11, 1947 in Japan; feelings upon discharge from military; enlisted in the Army Reserve from 1947-1968; rationale for joining the Army Reserve; training and duties while in the Reserves; served in Reserves during the Korean and Vietnam Wars; never called to active duty; release from Army Reserves on April 2, 1968; education and degrees received after active duty service; post military career in civil service position with Legal Section, Supreme Commander for Allied Powers, 500th Military Intelligence Group, United States Civil Service Administration of Ryukyu Islands, NISO Japan, and NISO Treasure Island, 12th Naval District; most interesting aspects of post military career; views on toughest part of service; scariest moment in service and World War II; thoughts on whether sacrifice during World War II was justified; how military training and service impacted outlook on life; most memorable experience while serving on active duty; advice for future generations.
Ann Yamasaki Collection
Collection ID: 92981
Yamasaki was interned at Marysville Assembly Center (a.k.a. Arboga Assembly Center), California, Tule Lake Relocation Center, California, and Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming.
BOX VHS-579 Video Interview with Ann Yamasaki, July 10, 1990
48 minutes
MV01: Topics covered include: early life; father worked in agriculture; parents were born in Japan; learning of the attack on Pearl Harbor; brother had been drafted in 1940; ordered to assembly center, age 23; changes in attitudes towards Japanese Americans; travel to Marysville Assembly Center (a.k.a. Arboga Assembly Center), California; poor conditions in assembly center; move to Tule Lake Relocation Center, California; loyalty questionnaire; brother's service, was not allowed to visit family in camp; mother injured in a landslide; mail censored; moved to Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming; worked in mess hall; found work in Chicago; differences between Tule Lake and Heart Mountain; redress movement; father's employer stored all of the family's belongings; parents' attitudes towards Japan; family's religion and cultural traditions; interactions with guards in internment camps; conditions in camps; daily life, recreation activities and work in camps; floods in Heart Mountain; visiting Japan in 1986; family in Japan; thoughts on atomic bombing; tradition of arranged marriage; meeting her husband; parents' marriage; family.
Series II: War Relocation Authority Civilian Employees & Military Support
Edna M. Becker Collection
Collection ID: 9653
Digital content available
Becker worked as a secretary for the federal government in several locations, including Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming.
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