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Mexican Revolution newspaper clippings archive, 1911-1913

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FOLDER 1 February 26, 1911 - March 16, 1911
(121 items)
ITEM 1Rebels open Agency, February 26, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 10: Discussion of the opening of a "confidential agency" representing the revolutionary party in Washington. The head of the agency is described as Dr. Francisco Vasquez Gomez, former physician to dictator Porfirio Díaz.
ITEM 2Talk of Peace in Mexico, February 27, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 4: The article announces that President Díaz wishes to negotiate with the revolutionary party at the border to arrange for the "termination of hostilities."
ITEM 3Chihuahua in Peril; Diaz Troops Moved, February 28, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces that Díaz has halted trains in northern Mexico, and that Dr. Vasquez Gomez has heard of peace envoys but cannot be held responsible for private negotiations. The article also announces a petition from San Antonio to the President and Congress to cease involvement in the revolution.
ITEM 4To Outflank Madero: Second Expedition Starts From Juarez- Troubled Mexican States, February 28, 1911T
Published in the New York Sun, p.2: The article announces the departure of federal troops from Juárez toward Chihuahua, several unsuccessful escape attempts at the Chihuahua penitentiary, and the impact of insurrecto involvement on the Yaqui River Railroad in Sonora.
ITEM 5Federals Expect to Flank Madero, February 28, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces the departure of federal troops from Júarez toward Chihuahua, and the arrest of the escapees from the Chihuahua penitentiary.
ITEM 6More Talk of Peace Offer, February 28, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, (No page number located): The article announces that Dr. Vasquez Gomez has been invited to negotiate with peace envoys at Corpus Christi, Texas.
ITEM 7Few Troops in Juarez, February 28, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article announces that Díaz has halted trains in northern Mexico, that federal troops have left Juárez, and that American property has suffered the imposition of taxes.
ITEM 8Two Days’ Fight at Ladura Ended With Dynamite, February 28, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 11: The article announces an insurgent attack on Ladura that included the use of dynamite to immediately elicit a surrender, and a tribute levied on local merchants, but not Americans. The article also mentions the attempted escapes from the Chihuahua penitentiary, a message relaying that insurgents are headed for Tia Juana, the theft of dynamite by insurrectos from a mine near Jimulco, and the San Antonio petition to the President and Congress to cease involvement in the revolution.
ITEM 9Rebellion Moving South: Railroads of Chihuahua Practically Out of Business, March 1, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 14: The article announces the Mexican government’s decision to remove its best cars from the Chihuahua-Mexico city line as a result of burned bridges and insurrecto involvement. It is mentioned that the rebels are under control of several railroads, where trains are frequently held up and passengers are taxed.
ITEM 10The Truth About Mexico and What Caused the Revolution, March 1, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 10: The article is a brief review of the revolution in Mexico that references the significance of Chihuahua and the insurrecto support of Madero. The article discusses the reasons behind the revolution, and the costly beautification of Mexico City as a significant factor contributing to the anger of the average Mexican.
ITEM 11Mexican Minister Sails for America, March 2, 1911
Published in the Washington Star, (No page number located): The article announces that José Yves Limantour, Mexico’s Minister of Finance, is headed from Paris to New York, with Yucatan as his final destination. The author writes that Limantour’s ideal peace plan would include the surrender of the insurrectos.
ITEM 12Plot to Kidnap Casasus: Reported that Rebels Will Seize Mexico’s Special Ambassador, March 2, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces the insurrecto plot to kidnap Mexico’s Special Ambassador Joaquin Casasus upon his return to Mexico from his trip to the U.S.
ITEM 13Plot to Kidnap Envoy of Mexico Reported, March 2, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article announces the insurrecto plot to kidnap Mexico’s Special Ambassador Joaquin Casasus upon his return to Mexico from his trip to the U.S. A rumor that the insurrectos were hoping to hold him for ransom is revealed.
ITEM 14Chihuahuans Starve as Revolution Brings All Business to Standstill, March 2, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article outlines the economic situation of Mexico as a result of the revolution, referencing the impact of insurrecto involvement on large haciendas, railroads, American property and bank affairs.
ITEM 15Foreign Investment Imperiled, March 2, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article discusses the vast amount of foreign investment in Chihuahua, and the disastrous effects of the revolution on the economy of the region and the success of the companies.
ITEM 16Seized on American Soil, March 2, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 10: The article announces the arrival of two men on American soil from Mexico, and reports the burning of dozens of bridges in Mexico.
ITEM 17Laughs at Bullets: Mexican Rebel Faces Garrison, Defying Federal Troops, March 2, 1911
Published in the Washington Star, (No page number located): The article discusses a conflict in which Ciro V. Amarilla, a "jefe politico," has been removed from Chihuahua City. It is mentioned that he had requested American soldiers to escort him to Texas, but was refused. The article also references the death threats that Amarilla faces from insurrectos if he attempts to travel without guards, and a recent rebel attack near Iguala, Guerrero.
ITEM 18Predict Change in Mexico Officials, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article announces various reassignments within the Díaz government, including the elevation of José Yves Limantour to Minister of Foreign Relations. References are made to the objections of the insurrectos, and the impact of the revolution on railroads.
ITEM 19Both Sides Kept Busy in Chihuahua Avoiding Battle, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article discusses the economic impact of the revolution on American investors and their property. The role of Chihuahua as the center of the revolutionary unrest is discussed.
ITEM 20Senor Limantour Starts for Home, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article announces that José Yves Limantour, Mexico’s Minister of Finance, is headed from Paris to New York, with Yucatan as his final destination. The author writes that Limantour’s ideal peace plan would include the surrender of the insurrectos.
ITEM 21Mexicans Banquet Gamboa: Barcelona Preparing to Welcome the Special Ambassador, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article announces a banquet to be held in honor of Señor Gamboa in Barcelona, the special Mexican Ambassador.
ITEM 22Fight Toward Chihuahua: Madero’s Rebels Have the Rest of Mexican Troops, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 14: The article announces that the federal troops are fighting the insurrectos near Chihuahua, and that the halted transportation and burned bridges have caused significant increases in prices in Chihuahua City.
ITEM 23Won’t Treat With Rebels: Mexico’s Foreign Minister Positively Denies Negotiations, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces that Enrique Creel, the current Minister for Foreign Affairs, has denied that any member of the Mexican government has been in contact with the revolutionary party regarding the possibility of peace negotiations.
ITEM 24Insurrectos Hem in Town of Chihuahua, March 3, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 11: The article discusses the economic impact of the revolution, including the rising costs of food and provisions, and the compromised success of businesses. It is also announced that Enrique Creel, the current Minister for Foreign Affairs, has denied that any member of the Mexican government has been in contact with the revolutionary party regarding the possibility of peace negotiations, and that Limantour is headed to New York from Paris.
ITEM 25Clash Near Chihuahua: Insurrectos Said to Have Been Successful in Battle, March 3, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces that the federal troops are fighting the insurrectos near Chihuahua, and that the insurrectos have been successful.
ITEM 26Fighting Close to Juarez, March 4, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article states that the American engineers in Mexico are refusing to contribute to the insurrecto cause, and that the federals are wary of conducting another battle in the open. It also announces that whether or not the U.S. decides to become involved in the revolution will be determined by the results of the negotiations.
ITEM 27Battle in Guerrero: The Mexican Revolt Spreads into Another State, March 4, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 4: The article announces that the revolution has spread to the state of Guerrero, and that Mazatlan has been looted by insurrectos.
ITEM 28Fighting Near El Paso, March 4, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article states that the American engineers in Mexico are refusing to contribute to the insurrecto cause, and that the federals are wary of conducting another battle in the open.
ITEM 29Fifty Federals Killed in Battle, March 4, 1911
Published in the Wshington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that fifty federal soldiers were killed, and General Luis Torres of Hermosillo was captured.
ITEM 30Plan to Give US Lower California, March 5, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces Mexico’s plan to give Lower California to the United States as a result of the constant expense it has been for Mexico. A territory of considerable wealth and potential, Americans have a strong interest in acquiring the territory.
ITEM 31Ambassador to Mexico Here Merely for a Visit, March 5, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article seeks to clarify numerous rumors that have been published claiming that U.S. Ambassador Henry Lane Wilson had been recalled by the State Department. The article insists that his trip to the U.S. was to visit his ill mother in Indiana, and that the trip unfortunately happened to coincide with the rumors.
ITEM 32Ambassador Wilson Scouts Retirement, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 7: The article announces Ambassador Henry Lane Wilson’s response to the claims that he had been recalled by the State Department, saying that Wilson believes he has the friendship of nearly every American residing in Mexico, and that he does not consider the rumors important enough to officially deny.
ITEM 33Chihuahua Cut Off From Outside World, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that although railroads through Chihuahua have been interrupted, and no damage has been done to the lines, the city has enough provisions for approximately two months and is in no danger of attack. A reference to the failing economy is made. The article also announces that Madero has released a statement denying and relationship to the newspaper The Regeneración.
ITEM 34Plan to Attach Chihuahua: 3,000 Rebels Advancing – Americans Kidnapped in U. S. Territory, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 12: The article announces that the revolutionary troops are preparing for battle, and that two Americans were captured approximately 500 feet from the border on U.S. soil. References are made to the continued impact of the revolution on railroads through Chihuahua.
ITEM 35A Siege of Chihuahua, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 4: The article announces that although railroads through Chihuahua have been interrupted, and no damage has been done to the lines, the city has enough provisions for approximately two months and is in no danger of attack. The article also announces a telegram to Secretary Knox from American Consul at Juárez Mr. Edwards formally requesting the return of the captured Americans.
ITEM 36'More Taxes Every Year' Plaint of Mexican Rebels, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article includes a first-hand account of the revolution from the perspective of an educated revolutionary, Don Luis Chavez. The revolutionary describes the incessant taxation of the poor and the differences between the current revolution and past revolutions, including the fact that past revolutions consisted of hacendados revolting against the government with support from their peons. Chavez states that the peons have finally realized that their interests and the interests of the elites are not the same.
ITEM 37Take Chihuahua and Juarez: Then Ask Recognition by U.S. Is Madero’s Plan, March 7, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 4: The article announces fighting between federal and rebel troops near Torreon, and the intention of the rebel troops to take Chihuahua and Juárez before asking to be recognized the U.S.
ITEM 38Madero’s Forces Near Chihuahua: Insurrectos Expect to Make City Headquarters, March 7, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 3: The article announces fighting between federal and rebel troops near Torreon, and the intention of the rebel troops to take Chihuahua and Juárez before asking to be recognized the U.S. The article also claims the insurrectos hope to make Chihuahua City their capital.
ITEM 39800 Rifles Seized at Mexican Border, March 7, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 9: The article announces that the U.S. has seized 800 rifles and 2,000 rounds of ammunition that was to be delivered to the insurrectos.
ITEM 40Mexican Insurgents Want No Aid from ‘Gringoes, March 7, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 9: The article announces that the insurrectos are averse to American aid, and that they feel that the Díaz regime favored foreign investment over poor Mexicans.
ITEM 41Twenty Thousand American Troops and Eight War Ships; Rushed to Mexican Border as Part of Big ‘War Game’; England’s Threat Said to Have Caused the Great Move, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict.
ITEM 42Mobilization of the Army, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict.
ITEM 43England’s Part in the Dispatch of Troops, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that government officials in England have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention.
ITEM 44Serious View in London: Statement Regarding Maneuvers Not Accepted by English Press, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that government officials in England have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention. The primary concern of England is revealed to be the economic interests of foreigners residing in Mexico.
ITEM 45No Alarm in Mexico: Minister Creel Denies That Powers Have Complained, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that Minister of Foreign Affairs Enrique Creel has denied having heard any reports of property damage from Americans or other foreigners in Mexico. Mexico’s official response to the U.S. troops stationed at the border is discussed.
ITEM 46U.S. Rushes Troops to Mexican Border, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that government officials in Europe have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention. The primary concern of Great Britain and France is revealed to be the economic interests of foreigners residing in Mexico.
ITEM 4720,000 Troops and Two Naval Divisions to Mobilize Near Mexican Border, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that government officials in England have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention. The primary concern of England is revealed to be the economic interests of foreigners residing in Mexico.
ITEM 48Troops Massed on Mexican Border, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict. The role of England in the decision to mobilize is discussed.
ITEM 49Great U.S. War Force in a Spectacular Dash to the Border of Mexico, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict. The role of England in the decision to mobilize, and U.S. consultation with the Díaz government are discussed.
ITEM 50On the Mexican Frontier, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 10: The article announces that troops have been positioned on the Mexican border, with many troops practicing in the gulf states.
ITEM 51Call Militia to War Game, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that troops have been positioned on the Mexican border, with many troops practicing along the Gulf state borders. Díaz’s health is addressed, and information is provided about Limantour’s recent meetings with local New York financiers and landowners in Mexico.
ITEM 52New Yorkers Figure in Mexican Problem: Minister Limantour Confers with Financiers Representing Vast Investments in Mexico, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 3: The article announces that the situation in Mexico is more serious than previously thought, and the property of American landowners is said to be at a great risk. Information is provided about Limantour’s recent meetings with local New York financiers and landowners in Mexico.
ITEM 53Taft is Not Acting on British Protest, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces that the London Foreign Service Office has not issued any demands to Washington regarding involvement in the revolution, and President Taft also denies acting on European pressure.
ITEM 54The Mexican Preparations, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict, and to express U.S. concern over the conflict in Mexico that is putting foreign property at risk.
ITEM 55Opposed to Intervention: Mexican Officials and Insurrecto Leaders Balk, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article discusses the issue of intervention from the perspective of Madero and the insurrectos. It states that official reports from Maderista officials assert that U.S. intervention would be inappropriate, and would mean war.
ITEM 56No Occasion for Alarm, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Hearld, p. 6: The article asserts that there is no reason for alarm, and that U.S. intervention in the Mexican conflict would be unnecessary.
ITEM 57Say Intervention Would Mean War, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Hearld, p. 4: The article asserts that there is no reason for alarm, and that U.S. intervention in the Mexican conflict would be unnecessary, and would mean war.
ITEM 58What the Mobilization Means, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Hearld, p. 10: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict.
ITEM 59Mexico’s Finance Minister Sees No War Menace, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article asserts that José Yves Limantour believes that there is no reason for alarm, and that there is no chance of war. The article also references a statement by Francisco León de la Barra in which he claims that the revolution is only a "disturbance" in Chihuahua.
ITEM 60Our Troops on the Border, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article discusses the positioning of American troops on the Mexican border, and the role of foreign governments in the decision to bring the troops there. It also discusses the extent of the revolution in Mexico, acknowledging that the true extent of the revolution is not well known outside of the country.
ITEM 61Troops Off for Virginia on the Way to Texas, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article announces that troops on their way to Texas have passed through Jamestown, Virginia. It is also announced that the leading officer is acting strictly on commands issued from the War Department.
ITEM 62Why Are the Troops Sent? March 9, 1911
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