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Mexican Revolution newspaper clippings archive, 1911-1913

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February 26, 1911 - March 16, 1911 (continued)
Why Are the Troops Sent? March 9, 1911 (continued)
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that the public is generally confused about the command. The article states that the official explanation that the government has issued describes the action simply as a series of maneuvers, however the amount of foreign investment in Mexico offers a different reasoning.
ITEM 63Mexican Councils Fluttered, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces that members of the Díaz government are not concerned about the uprisings in Mexico, nor about the U.S. troops massing near the border.
ITEM 64Diaz Recalls Reyes to Command Army? March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Hearld, p. 4: The article announces that Díaz has recalled General Bernard Reyes from Paris to lead the federal forces. It also references the U.S. mobilization of troops at the border, stating that the U.S. only intends to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict if necessary.
ITEM 65President Diaz Dead is Report, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces the supposed death of Díaz, and asserts that the rumors regarding Mexican support for U.S. involvement are untrue.
ITEM 66Mexico Society's Members, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 10: The article states that while the Mexico Society of New York consists mainly of supporters of the Díaz regime, it was actually created by New York journalists who hoped to create an organization that would strengthen friendly relationships between the U.S. and Mexico.
ITEM 67Yankee Troops are Rushing Down, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that Díaz’s health is in decline, and that Great Britain has threatened personal involvement if the U.S. does not take action in Mexico.
ITEM 68Death of Diaz Reported, But Not Verified, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that although the death of Díaz has been reported, neither affirmations nor denials of the report have been secured. References are also made to the 20,000 U.S. troops at the Mexican border.
ITEM 69Mexican Officials Confer in Gotham: De La Barra and Limantour Go Over Situation, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces that José Yves Limantour and Francisco León de la Barra have met to discuss current affairs, and have stated that Díaz is in good health, the revolution is under control, and the U.S. forces at the border are simply taking part in a series of maneuvers.
ITEM 70Dictator Diaz is Dying; Our Army to Crush Chaos if His Government Falls, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 10: The article announces that Díaz is dying, and that the U.S. troops could enter Mexico if the Díaz regime falls in order to protect foreign interests.
ITEM 71Aged Ruler of Southern Republic Reported to Have Suddenly Passed Away, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article announces that although the death of Díaz has been reported, neither affirmations nor denials of the report have been secured.
ITEM 72Map of the Border and Mexican Strategy Points, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article includes a map with indications of Mexican strategy points. References are made to the troops along the border, which are well prepared.
ITEM 73Fort Myer Officers Off to Mexico, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that it was likely due to European pressure or false information from individuals posing as the Mexican government. The article references the quick mobilization of the troops, and their preparedness
ITEM 74U.S. Troops to Aid in Crushing Revolt, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that the U.S. troops may offer aid in the revolution, on the command of U.S. President Taft. The reason for the mobilization of the U.S. troops at the Mexican border is discussed.
ITEM 75The Troops on the Border, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that the public is generally quiet about the command. The article states that the official explanation that the government has issued describes the action simply as a series of maneuvers, however the amount of foreign investment in Mexico may also be involved.
ITEM 76Expects an Invasion: Keifer Does Not Believe Army Mobilization Peaceful, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 2: The article announces that Representative Joseph Warren Keifer of Ohio claims that the mobilization of U.S. troops at the Mexican border is not for a series of maneuvers, but rather for another important reason that the President has not revealed.
ITEM 77Creel Wires World: Diaz is Well, Mexico Placid and Prosperous, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that Minister of Foreign Affairs Enrique Creel has written that Díaz’s health is well, and that there is no reason for concern in Mexico.
ITEM 78Army On Border to Stop Clash in Diaz Domain, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that President Taft’s officials have explained the mobilization of U.S. troops at the border as an attempt to stop the smuggling of weapons to insurrectos.
ITEM 79Taft to Stop Aid to Rebels and End Revolt, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that President Taft’s officials have explained the mobilization of U.S. troops at the border as an attempt to stop the smuggling of weapons to insurrectos.
ITEM 80Mr. Taft’s Duty to Mexico, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 8: The article argues that President Taft has a duty to Mexico not to give sanctuary or assistance to rebels working against the Mexican government.
ITEM 81Troops Are Sent When Germany Threatens Action, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that it was likely due to German pressure and upholding the Monroe Doctrine. The article references the importance of protecting foreign interests in Mexico.
ITEM 82Madero Defeated With Great Loss, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces that after a battle at Old Casas Grandes, Madero was defeated and both the rebels and the federal troops suffered significant losses.
ITEM 83Tells of Secret Pact: Mexico, Financier Says, has Treaty With Japan, March 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces a secret pact between Mexico and Japan regarding an offensive and defensive alliance. The article asserts that a Mexican financier provided the information, but that it is expected that the Japanese government will deny it.
ITEM 84U.S. to Maintain Peace in Mexico at All Hazards, March 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article asserts that President Taft’s officials have explained the mobilization of U.S. troops at the border as an attempt to stop the smuggling of weapons to insurrectos. It also announces that Baron Uchida of Japan has denied any interest in involvement in the conflict.
ITEM 85A Dangerous Situation, March 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the impact of the mobilization of the U.S. troops at the Mexican border, claiming that mobilization will either have been a costly expenditure that yielded no results, or interpreted as encouraging war.
ITEM 86To Patrol Mexican Coast: Cruiser Tacoma Ordered From Honduras, March 11, 1911
Published in the New york Sun, p. 1: The article announces that two scout cruiser vessels from Pensacola and Honduras have been ordered to patrol the Mexican coast.
ITEM 87No Danger of War, March 11, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 12: The article refers to American interests in Mexico, the need to be cautious with Mexican correspondence, and the conservative nature of President Taft, who holds the confidence of many Americans.
ITEM 88Taft and Knox Reported Split on Mexico Plan, March 11, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that Secretary of State Knox and Acting Secretary Wilson disapprove of the mobilization of troops, but that army officials have stated that more troops may be mobilized under the command of President Taft. A dispatch from Díaz is included stating that his health is "perfect".
ITEM 89Mexican Envoy Wants No Troops to Cross Border, March 11, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article announces that Francisco León de la Barra has denounced the act of U.S. intervention as unconstitutional and unnecessary. The article also asserts that José Yves Limantour has blamed the mobilization of troops on European pressure to protect foreign interests.
ITEM 90Mexico’s Naval Weakness, March 11, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 6: The article discusses Mexico’s large coastline, lack of a navy, and need to rely on U.S. protection.
ITEM 91Where the Mexican System Fails, March 12, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 8: The article discusses the lack of democratic elections in Mexico, and the fact that an autocrat no longer seems to be the best form of leadership for the Mexican people.
ITEM 92Rumors of Mexican Parley: Because Insurgents Gather Where Limantour Is, March 12, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article discusses rumors regarding meetings between Madero and Díaz officials, and debunks various other rumors. References are made to U.S. intervention and the Díaz officials continue to assert that it is not being considered.
ITEM 93Diaz Asks Right to Kill All Rebels, March 12, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1,7: The article announces that Díaz has asked permission from the Congress Commission to kill insurrectos that oppose his regime. The article also references Limantour’s statement that he has no plans to become president.
ITEM 94American Legion Exterminated in Mexican Battle, March 12, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces the deaths of several Americans in a recent battle at Casas Grandes, from the first-hand account of an American survivor. References are also made to England’s lack of interest in U.S. interest in Mexico.
ITEM 9520,000 More Troops Will Be Rushed to Mexican Line, San Antonio Hears, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3,4: The article announces that the mobilized troops will be doubled in response to increased insurrecto activity in Chihuahua.
ITEM 96Meaning Business in Mexico, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article discusses the role of the U.S. in the Mexican conflict, which is referred to as a "guerilla campaign of assassination, arson, larceny and general devastation," and not an organized revolution. References are made to Americans fighting with the insurrectos.
ITEM 97German Press Doubts Faith of Washington / British Not Alarmed: See No Reason for Concern Over Conditions in Mexico, March 13, 1911
Published in the Washington Star, p. 2: The article discusses the role of Germany in the revolution, and it’s disapproval of the U.S. government’s failure to clearly explain their mobilization of troops.
ITEM 98The United States and Mexico, March 13, 1911
Published in the Washington Star, (No page number located): The article asserts that it is the responsibility of the U.S. to keep the Mexican conflict from reaching U.S. territory.
ITEM 99Observers of Mexican Rule: Two Americans Who Know the Situation Down There, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 7: The article announces updates on the Mexican situation from the perspective of Americans who reside in Mexico. The Americans claim that the conflicts have not affected their property, and remain in local regions of northern Mexico.
ITEM 100Several Thousand Americans See a Mexican Victory, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article announces that at a recent battle over the Arizona border in Agua Prieta was successful for the federal troops because of their firearm advantage. The federal troops were armed with rifles and machine guns, while the revolutionaries had rifles, but lacked more modern weapons.
ITEM 101Rebels More Active; To Give No Quarter, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that the battle at Agua Prieta was unsuccessful for the revolutionaries, and that several Americans were involved in the conflict. Information received from Madero claims that the failure was due to a lack of communication.
ITEM 102Northern Mexico is Bordering on Panic, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces that the battle at Agua Prieta was unsuccessful for the revolutionaries, and that several Americans were involved in the conflict. It is asserted that further conflict is probable.
ITEM 103The Mexican Presidency, March 13, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 8: The article discusses the requirements for one to take up the Mexican presidency, asserting that José Yves Limantour and Enrique Creel are ineligible because of their parents.
ITEM 104Foolish Talk About Invasion, March 14, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article considers the reasoning behind the mobilization of U.S. troops to the Mexican border, and Mexican interpretation of the action.
ITEM 105Both Sides Have Rights, March 14, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the withdrawal of the U.S. troops at the Mexican border, attributing it to Mexican disapproval and public distrust of President Taft in the U.S.
ITEM 106Our Responsibility, March 14, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 6: The article asserts that the U.S. would only be responsible for an invasion of Mexico if the Mexican government were unable to protect foreign interests.
ITEM 107Insurrectos Active Along the Border, March 14, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that unconstitutional deprivation of rights for the insurrectos will be passed in the Mexican congress, and that insurrectos activity along the border has increased.
ITEM 108Invasion Only If Mexico Fails to Act, March 14, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article asserts that the U.S. would only be responsible for an invasion of Mexico if the Mexican government were unable to protect foreign interests.
ITEM 109Would Crush Revolt: G. C. Kniffer Thinks United States Should Aid Diaz, March 14, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that Gilbert C. Kniffer has stated that the U.S. troops should intervene in the Mexican conflict, and that it would be good for business.
ITEM 110Diaz a Sufferer From Sclerosis: Mexican President’s Successor Decided Upon in the Event of His Death, March 14, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article asserts that Díaz is suffering from arterial sclerosis, and that a capable successor has been selected.
ITEM 111New War Plan Approved: Commission of Mexican Congress Gives Unanimous Assent, March 14, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces that Mexico’s war plan to limit the rights of revolutionaries has passed through the Mexican congress, and the U.S. is already sending additional troops to the border in preparation for an escalated conflict.
ITEM 112Diaz Describes His Daily Habits; Never Better, He Tells the World, March 15, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article describes an interview with Díaz in which he asserts that he is in perfect health.
ITEM 113May Move Army to Mexican Border, March 15, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article announces that the conflict in Mexico is much more serious than information from Mexican officials would suggest. The article also mentions that the insurrectos are very active, and that recent information from a general in San Antonio conveyed a need for more troops on the El Paso border due to continued unrest in Chihuahua.
ITEM 114American Criminals in Mexico, March 15, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article addresses the presence of Americans in Mexico that have joined the insurrecto cause and are fighting against the Mexican government. The article asserts that these men are not to be sympathized with, and are breaking both U.S. and Mexican law.
ITEM 115Limantour Not Conferring: Five Maderos Here Now For Something, March 15, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces that Limantour and other Díaz officials have not met with the insurrectos, and refuse to do so until the lay down their arms.
ITEM 116Release of Americans in Mexican Jail Demanded; Envoy Says United States Citizens Stir Revolt, March 15, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 1: The article discusses the status of the American citizens who had been captured by Mexican authorities on U.S. land after assisting the insurrectos. The article also makes a reference to the anti-American sentiments in Mexico.
ITEM 117Facts Concerning Mexico and Diaz’s Rise to Power, March 15, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article lists various facts about Mexico, including the population, its international status, and its major economic goods.
ITEM 118Boundary Dispute Develops: Rio Grande Shifts Its Bed Between Mexico and U. S., March 16, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces a recent border dispute regarding the location of conflicts around the Rio Grande. The article asserts that the two men who were captured while fighting for the insurrectos were determined to have been captured on U.S. land.
ITEM 119The Personal Pledge of Every American Citizen, March 16, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 6: The article quotes the Supreme Court’s ruling on the role of the U.S. in foreign affairs during times of war.
ITEM 120Dispute Over Detention of Two Americans in Mexico Heightens; National Guard Forces May Be Sent..., March 16, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 1: The article announces that the border dispute regarding the capture of the two Americans who were fighting for the revolutionary cause has escalated into a larger conflict that may require additional U.S. troops along the Mexican border.
ITEM 121Limantour Steals Away: The Mexican Finance Minister Leaves City Secretly, March 16, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 4: The article announces that Limantour has departed for Mexico, and that he has blamed the escalation of events in Mexico in large part on the manner in which the U.S. press chose to report it.
FOLDER 2 March 17, 1911 - July 31, 1911
(131 items)
ITEM 1Limantour Moves, Veiled in Mystery, March 17, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article asserts that José Yves Limantour’s return to Mexico will bring changes to the Mexican government, and could possibly help resolve the conflict.
ITEM 2A Case for Making Sure, March 17, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article argues that both sides in the border dispute have reason to be concerned about the situation and the fate of the American prisoners. A reference is also made to the genuine belief of both parties that the incident occurred on their territory.
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