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Mexican Revolution newspaper clippings archive, 1911-1913

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FOLDER 2 March 17, 1911 - July 31, 1911
(131 items)
ITEM 1Limantour Moves, Veiled in Mystery, March 17, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article asserts that José Yves Limantour’s return to Mexico will bring changes to the Mexican government, and could possibly help resolve the conflict.
ITEM 2A Case for Making Sure, March 17, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article argues that both sides in the border dispute have reason to be concerned about the situation and the fate of the American prisoners. A reference is also made to the genuine belief of both parties that the incident occurred on their territory.
ITEM 3Making Work for Mr. Knox, March 17, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 8: The article announces that Secretary of State Knox had no part in the decision to mobilize U.S. troops at the Mexico border, and that his response to the situation will shed light on the "war game."
ITEM 4Gen. Carter’s Army Ready to Move on an Hour’s Notice, March 17, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that the San Antonio public does not believe the explanation that the troops had been mobilized for a series of maneuvers. References are also made to the escalation and spreading of the revolution, and the guarding of the American consulate.
ITEM 5Nab Mexican Spy: Police Question Alleged Employee of Diaz Regime, March 17, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that a spy employed by the Díaz regime, James D. Hallen, has been caught in Washington, having attempted to break into the law offices of the revolutionary party. The article states that proof was found in the form of correspondence between the spy and the Díaz regime.
ITEM 6Orders Given Troops to Be Ready to Move, March 18, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article states that troops along the border have been preparing for intervention, and that none of the troops are convinced of the explanation that the mobilization is for the purpose of a series of maneuvers.
ITEM 7Palace of Diaz Stoned by a Mob, March 18, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 3: The article announces that the palace of Díaz has been attacked by a mob of Madero supporters. The article states that the Mexican government has suppressed news of the attack.
ITEM 8Endless Supply of Maderos to Keep Up Revolt Against Diaz, March 18, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 5: The article states that Madero has seven brothers and various other relatives that could continue the revolution in the event of his death. The article discusses the relationship between the Maderos and the wealth of their grandfather.
ITEM 9Madero Seeks a Capital: Insurgent Leader Has No Idea of Stopping War, March 18, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that Madero hopes to make a capital for the revolutionists just south of El Paso in the state of Chihuahua. It is revealed that he does not intend to stop the revolution.
ITEM 10Will Blow Up Bridges to Stop Limantour, March 18, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that rebels have planned to destroy bridges and railroads in Northern Mexico to impede the return of José Yves Limantour. It is stated that officials are not concerned, and remain confident about restoring order.
ITEM 11Limantour on the Magazines, March 19, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that Limantour has departed for Mexico, and that he has blamed the escalation of events in Mexico in large part on U.S. muckraking journalism.
ITEM 12Expect Big Change in Mexican Cabinet, March 19, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article announces that changes will occur in Díaz’s cabinet, starting with the replacement of current Minister of Foreign Affairs Enrique Creel with José Yves Limantour.
ITEM 13Limantour Guarded Enters Rebel Zone, March 19, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that José Yves Limantour has crossed the border into Mexico, and is in a private train car with concealed windows.
ITEM 14On Peace Errand Limantour Enters Mexico in Peril, March 19, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that José Yves Limantour has crossed the border into Mexico in a private train car. The article asserts that he has a peace plan.
ITEM 15Juarez Expects Attack: Madero Drawing His Scattered Insurgent Bands Together, March 19, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces that Madero is assembling troops near Juárez, and that Mexico City will hold festivities in honor of the return of Limantour.
ITEM 16Whole U. S. Force to Move Forward: Trains Ready at San Antonio- Troops Alert for a Sudden Start, March 20, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article states that troops along the border have been preparing for Intervention, and have begun advancing.
ITEM 17Peace in Mexico May Come This Week, March 20, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that officials in Washington, DC expect positive results from peace conferences between Limantour and other government officials in Mexico City.
ITEM 18Army to Move On: Gen. Carter’s Division Will Be in Field in Four Days, March 20, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that the U.S. army is getting prepared to move quickly in the event that the Díaz regime fails to grant concessions to the insurrectos and more violence ensues.
ITEM 19Must Uphold Diaz: Limantour Warns Mexicans of Peril of Intervention, March 21, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that Limantour has denied that he has brought a peace agreement, and asserts that the Mexican government will not negotiate with the insurrectos as long as they are armed.
ITEM 20A Most Valuable Affair, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 8: The article sarcastically refers to the mobilization of the troops as a "most valuable affair," in which distrust between the U.S. and Mexico is created, and information is withheld by the President, among other things.
ITEM 21Taft Grasps Mexico Tangle, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that President Taft returned from his vacation and has been getting up to date on the status of the revolution. It is stated that the president will meet with his cabinet the following day, and that the mobilized troops will be slowed.
ITEM 22Mexico Urges Mr. Taft to Recall Army, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 1,4: The article announces that officers of the Díaz regime are requesting that President Taft recall U.S. troops due to their negative reception in Mexico.
ITEM 23Limantour Home; Warmly Upholds Diaz, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that Limantour has denied that he has brought a peace agreement, and asserts that he is not interested in the presidency.
ITEM 24Rebel Force Likely to Take Hermosillo, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article announces that the rebel forces will likely take Hermosillo, and that Madero has stated that he would negotiate peace terms during an armed truce.
ITEM 25The Situation Clearing, March 21, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article announces a reduction of serious complications in Mexico as a result of the peace negotiations and halted activity in the field.
ITEM 26Madero Promises an Armed Truce Will Be Declared, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 4: The article announces that Madero intends to negotiate peace with the Díaz regime, and states that Limantour has denied any correspondence regarding peace.
ITEM 27Capital Hails Limantour: Crowd Greets Him as the Man to Save Mexico, March 21, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces that Limantour was greeted with a crowd in Mexico City, and is considered to be the peace negotiator. It also states that upon arrival, Limantour asserted that Díaz is the leader of Mexico, and that reforms are promised.
ITEM 28President Taft Refuses to Recall Troops at Mexican Envoy’s Behest, March 22, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 4: The article announces that President Taft does not intend to recall U.S. troops unless progress is visible. It also states that there are no signs of negotiations in Mexico.
ITEM 29It Was Big Business, March 22, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 10: The article announces that the White House has claimed that unrest in "Big Business" was the reason for the mobilization of troops at the Mexican border. The article asserts that President Taft’s recent regulation of zealous troops on the border suggests that this reasoning may be valid.
ITEM 30Taft Will Let Congress Order Troops Forward, March 22, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that while there is no intention to allow U.S. troops to cross into Mexico, they will be ordered to do so by Congress if necessary.
ITEM 31Troops to Remain: Denied That Army Will Be Withdrawn from Texas, March 22, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that the troops have not been recalled, and that they may be required to cross the border into Mexico on orders from Congress.
ITEM 32Taft Doesn’t Expect War: So Secretary Dickinson Tells Confederate Grays, March 22, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 4: The article announces that President Taft does not envision a conflict with Mexico, and references are made to the perspective of Secretary Dickinson.
ITEM 33Limantour Disappoints: No Signs of Peace Result from His Return, Taft’s Mexican Policy Justified, March 22, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces that Limantour’s lack of action upon returning to Mexico has been a disappointment. It is also state that Taft’s decision to mobilize troops was successful in that it assisted in bringing peace.
ITEM 34Limantour’s Return Dims Peace Hopes, March 22, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 3,4: The article announces that Limantour has not brought a peace agreement, and that Madero has claimed that peace negotiations will only be possible under arms.
ITEM 35Mexico’s Brighter Outlook, March 22, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 10: The article asserts that the situation in Mexico has improved, and that Limantour has proposed several reforms to pacify the insurrectos. The low likelihood of U.S. interference is referenced briefly.
ITEM 36The Mexican Outlook, March 22, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article asserts that the Mexican government will not negotiate with the insurrectos as long as they are armed. It also states that Limantour has suggested reforms, an action that may deter many Mexicans from joining the insurrectos.
ITEM 37Federals and Rebels Fire on U. S. Troops, March 23, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that bullets crossed the border and targeted U.S. troops. It also states that the U.S. has halted the transfer of supplies, and is awaiting an official explanation for the shots fired.
ITEM 38Troops Sent to Stop Raids from Mexico, March 23, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2,3: The article announces that U.S. troops have been sent to Terlingua to protect the border
ITEM 39Ride Hard to Save Terlingua: U.S. Troopers in a Race With Starving Insurrectos, March 23, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 5: The article announces that U.S. troops have been sent to Terlingua to protect the border from thefts as a result of starvation and lack of supplies in Northern Mexico.
ITEM 40Mr. Taft Not Alarmed by Political Attacks, March 23, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 4: The article announces that President Taft is not concerned about political backlash regarding his decision to mobilize U.S. troops at the Mexican border because he believes that his policies will win approval of the public.
ITEM 41Limantour Admits Failure: Could Not Reach Rebel Leader- Strong Feeling Against Government, March 23, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that Limantour recently admitted to not having a plan to resolve the issues in Mexico. It is stated that Limantour was confused about the negative sentiments in Mexico toward the Díaz regime, and acknowledged the need to rewrite the electoral laws.
ITEM 42Limantour Says Crisis Is Worse; No Plan to End It, March 23, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1,5: The article announces that Limantour does not intend to concede to the rebel forces. It also states that although the government is considering rewriting the electoral laws, it is not to appease the rebels.
ITEM 43Predicts Intervention by First of May, March 24, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1,4: The article announces that U.S. intervention has been predicted to occur on May 1, 1911 if no signs of peace have appeared.
ITEM 44Four Americans Shot?: New Rumor of Summary Execution by Mexican Regular Troops, March 24, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces that four Americans were executed by Mexican troops in Arizona following their capture with insurrecto troops.
ITEM 45Mexicans Did Fire on Americans: U.S. Marshal Hears, March 24, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 7: The article announces that the U.S. Marshal has heard that Mexicans fired on Americans, although General Duncan believes he would have been notified if the firing had occurred.
ITEM 46Calls for Recruits: War Department Sends Urgent Order to Stations, March 24, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that the U.S. is calling for recruits to send to the southwest to defend the U.S. border. It also states that mobilization of troops has been quick and successful.
ITEM 47Peace by May 1 Or Intervention, March 24, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that U.S. intervention has been predicted to occur on May 1, 1911 if no signs of peace have appeared. It is announced that a warning has been sent to Madero.
ITEM 48Madero Expects to Take Juarez and Chihuahua, March 24, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that the insurrectos are planning on attacking Juarez and Chihuahua, and that it is predicted to be the biggest uprising of the revolution thus far. It is also stated that the goal of the uprising is to mobilize trains in the north for supplies.
ITEM 49What Does Limantour Mean? March 24, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 10: The article announces that Limantour has returned to Mexico and stated that a distinct change in the support for the Díaz regime occurred in his absence, and that the insurrectos made an impact. The article suggests that Limantour spoke too freely for an officer of the Díaz regime.
ITEM 50Diaz’s Cabinet Resigns in Body, March 25, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1,3: The article announces that the cabinet of Díaz has resigned, with the exception of Limantour. The article suggests that the cabinet consisted of primarily men over sixty who had been officials of the Díaz regime for many years.
ITEM 51Mexican Rebels’ Plans, March 25, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article suggests that the insurrectos hope to provoke U.S. involvement in Mexico in order to create a war. It also refers to Díaz as "the best chief of state their country has ever had".
ITEM 52Madero Wins Battle: Federal Troops Reported Routed Near Chihuahua, March 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that the insurrectos have one a decisive victory near Chihuahua, and intend to move toward Lower California to continue their rebellion in response to the suspension of their constitutional rights.
ITEM 53Diaz Cabinet Resigns to Reestablish Peace, March 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that the cabinet of Díaz has resigned, with the exception of Limantour. The article states that the U.S. was expecting the resignations and is not taken by surprise.
ITEM 54Mexican Cabinet Resigns; Gen. Diaz Defers Action, Mexican Cabinet Resigns in a Body, March 25, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article announces that the cabinet of Díaz has resigned, with the exception of Limantour. The article also references the bullets that went over the Texas border, stating that they were not intended for Americans and were accidental.
ITEM 55Cabinet of Diaz Resigns in a Body, March 25, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that the cabinet of Díaz has resigned, with the exception of Limantour. The article also states that the resignations disappointed the U.S., who thought that a resolution would be possible.
ITEM 56President Diaz’s Entire Cabinet Suddenly Resigns: Excited Throngs Hear News in Mexican Capital, March 25, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that the cabinet of Díaz has resigned, with the exception of Limantour. The article suggests that the cabinet consisted of primarily men over sixty who had been officials of the Díaz regime for many years.
ITEM 57Mexican Cabinet Resigns in Body; Situation Grave, Firing Upon U. S. Troops Explained, March 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that the cabinet of Díaz has resigned, with the exception of Limantour. The article also references the bullets that went over the Texas border, stating that insurrectos mistook the Americans for federal troops.
ITEM 58Hundreds Are Killed in Two Days’ Battle, Outlook Indicates Peace for Mexico, March 27, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that there were hundreds of casualties in the latest battle of the revolution near Tepic, and that most losses occurred on the federal side. The article also refers to Limantour’s promise to enact reforms to appease the insurrectos, stating that peace is possible if the insurrectos believe Limantour to be sincere.
ITEM 59De La Barra Sure New Cabinet Can Pacify Populace, Gen. Reyes Hailed Savior of Mexico, March 27, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article states that the Mexican Ambassador to the U.S. Francisco León de la Barra has left the U.S. to become Minister of Foreign Affairs in the new Díaz cabinet, which he believes will be able to pacify the people. The article also states that General Bernardo Reyes is a popular option to succeed Díaz.
ITEM 60Silver Lining to Mexico’s Cloud, March 27, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article suggests that although the resignation of Díaz’s cabinet is a clear victory for the insurrectos, the opportunity to create a new cabinet of more progressive officials could be positive for the Díaz regime.
ITEM 61Party Factions Play Strong Hand in Forming New Diaz Cabinet, March 27, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 7: The article announces the potential new cabinet members of the Díaz regime, and their significance.
ITEM 62 March 27, 1911
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