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Mexican Revolution newspaper clippings archive, 1911-1913

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FOLDER 3 August 1, 1911 - December 24, 1911
(105 items)
ITEM 1Madero Ousts Customs Men, August 1, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces that Ernesto Madero returned jobs at the Juarez Custom House to federal soldiers, ousting the rebels.
ITEM 2Juarez Customs Seized, August 2, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces that Ernesto Madero returned jobs at the Juarez Custom House to federal workers, ousting the rebels. The rebels, in response, prevented the federal workers from returning and forced several resignations.
ITEM 3Soldiers Overawe El Oro, August 2, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 2: The article announces a strike at a mine in El Oro, Mexico, on which federal soldiers opened fire. The article asserts that the request for higher wages is merely incidental, and that the strike was actually intended to antagonize foreigners.
ITEM 4Reyes for President, August 5, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces the candidacy of General Bernardo Reyes in the next presidential election. The article states that he will be running with the Mexican Catholic Party.
ITEM 5Firmer Hand Now in Mexico, August 7, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 10: The article announces that Madero has declared that he will support de la Barra’s vision for peace through firmer suppression of anarchist groups.
ITEM 6Land for Poor Mexicans, August 8, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that Díaz has proposed a plan to divide lands for the poor. The article states that 24,000 acres in Conora will be distributed to the Yaqui Indians.
ITEM 7Mexican Troops in Clash, August 8, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article announces a conflict between a bands of insurrectos and the troops of General Blanco, the latter having wanted to bring captured artillery with them to the south.
ITEM 8Quieter in Mexico, August 8, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article announces that the U.S. embassy in Mexico has reported that the conditions in Mexico are becoming normal.
ITEM 9The Texas Maneuvers, August 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 8: The article states that Major General Carter, the commander of the U.S. troops that were mobilized at the Mexican border, is pleased with the success of their actions. The article states that General Carter believes that the mobilization had a positive impact on the efficiency of the troops.
ITEM 10Asks Limantour to Return, August 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, (No page number located): The article announces an unverified cipher-cablegram aid to have been sent by Francisco de la Barra to José Yves Limantour, requesting his return for help controlling the revolution.
ITEM 11Mexico’s Outlook Hopeful, August 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that all countries appear to be at peace with Mexico, and that no claims are currently being pressed, even after the capture of several Americans and the killing of many Chinese at Torreon. The article also states that the provisional government in Mexico is optimistic.
ITEM 12"$10,000,000 for Mexico, August 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article states that the Mexican government borrowed $10,000,000 from Speyer and Co. The article asserts that the quick sale of the Mexican currency implies confidence in the stability of the new government.
ITEM 13Catholic Party in Mexico Demands Clean Government and Enforcement of the Law, August 11, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article announces that the Catholic party in Mexico intends to select a candidate for the upcoming presidency, but does not wish to get involved in political affairs. The article asserts that the Pope authorized the party, and only demands clean government and law enforcement.
ITEM 14Gomez to Oppose Madero, August 12, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article announces that following Madero’s abandonment of the Anti-Re-electionists, Francisco Vasquez Gomez, Minister of Foreign Affairs, was selected to run against him.
ITEM 15Mexican Rebels Fire on a Train, August 12, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 7: The article announces that rebels fired upon a passenger train traveling from Cuernavaca to Mexico City. The article states that nearly every window on the train was broken, and passengers were forced to remain on the floor for nearly two hours.
ITEM 16Throngs Abandon Mexico, August 12, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 5: The article announces that throngs of people have been leaving Mexico in lieu of recent events, and passenger traffic into Mexico has decreased significantly. The article asserts that Mexico is expecting bloodshed in the coming election.
ITEM 17Mexican Army to Move on Rebels: President de la Barra Sends Reinforcements to General Huerta at Cuernavaca, August 14, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 7: The article announces that the Mexican army intends to target the rebels by sending reinforcements to Cuernavaca. The article also states that Madero will attempt to personally dissuade Zapata from further activity.
ITEM 18De La Barra in Race, August 14, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that the Liberal Radical party nominated Francisco de la Barra for the presidency. The article also states that de la Barra is expected to win the support of the Catholic party as well.
ITEM 19Say Rebels Plan Battle at Ayala, August 15, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article announces that although Colonel Blanquet’s brigade has been sent to Cuernavaca, there has been word of resistance of the federal forces by the men of Emiliano Zapata.
ITEM 20Mexican Rebels Refuse to Quit, August 15, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number found):
ITEM 21Revolt Brews in Mexico, August 16, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that the government has accepted another revolution after their inability to stop Zapata without the use of federal forces. The article asserts that while the government is not fearful, it does expect a difficult conflict.
ITEM 22Zapata Will Surrender, August 16, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 7: The article announces that Zapata’s troops are located in Cuautla, and that Zapata is currently drafting a message to the President urging him not to send federal troops. The article suggests that Zapata’s statement implies surrender.
ITEM 23Lower California Trouble: Regular Cavalry to Patrol the Border to Keep Mexicans Out, August 17, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article announces that U.S. troops have been sent to Lower California to prevent Mexicans from entering the U.S. The article states that State Department accepted a request from the Mexican government to send federal troops through the U.S. to Lower California to restore order.
ITEM 24Again Guard Mexico Border, August 17, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces that U.S. troops have once again been mobilized to the Mexican border in Lower California as a result of current conflicts near the border.
ITEM 25Mexican Rebels Have Girl Leader, August 18, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that two female leaders of Zapatista troops, Margarita Neri and Esperanza Echavarria, are involved in the conflict at Cuautla. The article also mentions that many have been killed in the battles in Morelos.
ITEM 26Troops to Restore Order, August 21, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article announces that the federal troops intend to occupy Zapatista towns and restore order before withdrawing from Morelos.
ITEM 27Hostile to Madero, August 22, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article announces that Madero’s speech to Zapata led him to lose the favor of the Catholic party because of his words against General Bernardo Reyes.
ITEM 28Mexico’s Political Confusion, August 22, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 6: The article announces that the Liberal Party of Mexico has selected Francisco de la Barra, and that he his provisional presidency been recognized by all parties with the exception of Dr. Vasquez Gomez.
ITEM 29Mustering Out Zapatistas, August 22, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article announces that the federal raid in Cuautla has begun, and that many Zapatistas have moved forward to different areas to continue their revolt. The article also mentions the Madero suspected General Bernardo Reyes of a plot to continue the conflict.
ITEM 30General Zapata’s Forces Surrender, August 23, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 6: The article announces that the Zapatistas have surrendered in Morelos to Madero and the federal troops. The article also notes with surprise that the Zapatistas do not posses modern rifles.
ITEM 31The Mistake of Gomez (Cuban President), August 23, 1911
Published in the New York Times, (No page number located): The article announces that critical journalists in Cuba have been banished by the government, and that the media is being censored by this action. The article asserts that free speech is essential to democracy.
ITEM 32'Mexico is Peaceful': So Says Washington Attorney After Visit There, August 23, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 2: The article announces that Captain Sherburne G. Hopkins has stated that Mexico is peaceful, and that there are currently few concerns there. The article also states that Hopkins asserts that Madero will be elected with the majority of the votes.
ITEM 33Zapatists Fire on Federal Troops, August 24, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 6: The article announces that the federal troops attempted to disarm the Zapatistas, but were only partially successful because many weapons carried in the field were not surrendered.
ITEM 34Mexican Bureau to Be Established, August 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 3: The article announces the establishment of a bureau of information in New York City to display Mexican and American goods, in an effort to improve commercial relations.
ITEM 35New Army for Mexico, August 25, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 12: The article announces that Díaz’s methods of enlisting convicts to the federal army have been dismissed. The article states that the new method will entail payment of soldiers and efforts to boost morale.
ITEM 36Madero Accuses Reyes, August 25, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article discusses the conflict between Francisco I. Madero and General Bernardo Reyes in the upcoming election, highlighting their disagreements.
ITEM 37Madero Accuses Gen. Reyes, August 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article discusses the conflict between Francisco I. Madero and General Bernardo Reyes in the upcoming election, highlighting their disagreements.
ITEM 38Deny Adolfo Diaz is Out (Nicaraguan President), August 25, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article discusses the rumor that Señor Don Adolfo Diaz of Nicaragua has resigned, and states that it has not been based in fact. There is also a reference to Nicaragua’s financial need, and potential U.S. loans.
ITEM 39General Madero Hailed at Capital, August 25, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 6: The article announces that upon his arrival at Morelos, General Madero was greeted enthusiastically for his peace efforts.
ITEM 40Mexican Conditions, August 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the current situation in Mexico, highlighting the ways in which it differs from the previous regime. The article specifically mentions the investigation into the concessions that were granted under the Díaz regime.
ITEM 41Insurgents Lay Down Arms, August 25, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 4: The article announces that the situation with the rebels has improved, and that many have laid down arms and no U.S. property has been damaged.
ITEM 42The Monroe Doctrine: Does It Obstruct Development of Other American Republics, August 25, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 6: The article includes correspondence to the editor of The Sun by William L. Dooley of Brooklyn. He criticizes the Monroe Doctrine and refers to Mexico as uncivilized and in need of European intervention.
ITEM 43Madero’s Charges Believed, August 26, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article announces the general acceptance of Madero’s belief that General Bernardo Reyes was plotting his death.
ITEM 44Quiet on Mexican Border, August 27, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that as a result of the improving conditions in Mexico, the U.S. has removed the majority of its troops from the border.
ITEM 45The Outlook in Mexico: The Revolution and Its Causes, August 27, 1911
Published in the London Times, p. 5: The article discusses the current situation in Mexico, referring to Madero’s recent election as a historic moment for Latin America.
ITEM 46Señor Madero to Be Named To-Day, August 28, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 10: The article announces that the Popular Progressive party will nominate Madero and that the Convention will be held today. Several options for vice president are listed.
ITEM 47Revolt Feared in Mexico, August 29, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces that Independence Day celebrations will be postponed due to fear of rebel attacks. It is stated that the Mexican government is taking active steps to curb the socialists.
ITEM 48Troops May Enter Mexico / Claim Damages from Mexico / Arms Shipped to Mexico, August 30, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that the War Department revoked the orders that previously kept U.S. troops from entering Mexico due to the improving conditions there. It is also stated that many damage claims from U.S. citizens have been sent to the Mexican government via the State Department for consideration. A reference is also made to arms shipments from Guatemala to Mexico.
ITEM 49Mexicans Write Platform, August 30, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 5: The article announces that the Progressive party is drafting a platform, with the intention of uniting the nation, revising the system of taxation, developing public resources, and removing special privileges for monopolies.
ITEM 50Progressives in Mexico name Madero as Leader, August 31, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 14: The article announces that the Progressive party has named Madero as their candidate for the presidency. It is stated that it may be another day before the vice presidential candidate is chosen.
ITEM 51Madero Accepts Party Platform, September 1, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article announces that Madero has accepted the Progressive party platform, and parts of his speech are included. The article states that foreign property will be protected, but that it will be given no special privileges under his presidency. An emphasis is placed on law reform regarding foreign monopolies in Mexico.
ITEM 52Mob Stones Reyes, September 4, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that General Bernardo Reyes has been stoned and mobbed in Mexico City by rioters who support Madero. The article also states that the rioters were fired on by federal troops, and that five people have been killed and many have been injured.
ITEM 53Battle in Mexico, September 5, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces the death of sixty of Zapata’s men in a conflict with federal troops at Morelos, and refers to the riot against General Bernardo Reyes with concern for Madero’s candidacy.
ITEM 54To Drop Nitro on City: Mexican Insurgents Planning the Capture of Juarez, September 7, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1: The article announces that the Magonista insurgents plan to drop nitroglycerin from box kites onto Juárez on September 16. The article states that the Magonista activity has made local merchants uneasy.
ITEM 55Killed in Mexican Riot, September 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces a clash between the Reyistas and the Maderistas in Tuxtla, Chico in Chiapas, which occurred after a parade in honor of General Bernardo Reyes. It is stated that the incident resulted in nine dead and many injured.
ITEM 56No Revolt with Three Guns, September 14, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 4: The article announces that the uprising that was expected in Juárez failed due to insufficient arms and ammunition from El Paso.
ITEM 57Gomez Cheapening Madero, September 15, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 10: The article discusses news from Dr. Vasquez Gomez regarding the peace negotiations at Juárez and his true role in them. The article states that Gomez has presented documentation to prove his own role in the meetings and Madero’s hesitance. Additional references are made to the allegations that the revolution was funded by Standard Oil Company and other American companies, but this is not verified by Gomez.
ITEM 58Foreigners Dread Mexican Holiday, September 15, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article announces that foreigners are concerned about the Mexican Independence Day celebrations, and that consuls are appealing for protection during the holiday. The article also states that the government asserts there is little danger of disorder.
ITEM 59Say Trust Backed Madero, September 15, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article announces that Gomez has evidence that the Standard Oil Company financed Madero’s revolution. It is stated that the Standard Oil Company would have been interested in the revolution for its own economic interests in Mexico following the revolution.
ITEM 60De La Barra Eager to Quit Presidency, September 18, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 5: The article asserts that de la Barra is eager for the presidential election to occur so that he may return to Italy and quit the presidency.
ITEM 61Frauds in War Damage Fund: Huge Mexican Government Scandal Threatened, September 18, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article reveals a scandal in the Mexican government regarding the damage claims during the revolution. The article states that the individuals who filed claims found that they were being charged 50% when they came to claim their damages.
ITEM 62Won’t Postpone Election, September 19, 1911
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