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Mexican Revolution newspaper clippings archive, 1911-1913

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February 26, 1911 - March 16, 1911 (continued)
ITEM 27Battle in Guerrero: The Mexican Revolt Spreads into Another State, March 4, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 4: The article announces that the revolution has spread to the state of Guerrero, and that Mazatlan has been looted by insurrectos.
ITEM 28Fighting Near El Paso, March 4, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article states that the American engineers in Mexico are refusing to contribute to the insurrecto cause, and that the federals are wary of conducting another battle in the open.
ITEM 29Fifty Federals Killed in Battle, March 4, 1911
Published in the Wshington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that fifty federal soldiers were killed, and General Luis Torres of Hermosillo was captured.
ITEM 30Plan to Give US Lower California, March 5, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces Mexico’s plan to give Lower California to the United States as a result of the constant expense it has been for Mexico. A territory of considerable wealth and potential, Americans have a strong interest in acquiring the territory.
ITEM 31Ambassador to Mexico Here Merely for a Visit, March 5, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article seeks to clarify numerous rumors that have been published claiming that U.S. Ambassador Henry Lane Wilson had been recalled by the State Department. The article insists that his trip to the U.S. was to visit his ill mother in Indiana, and that the trip unfortunately happened to coincide with the rumors.
ITEM 32Ambassador Wilson Scouts Retirement, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 7: The article announces Ambassador Henry Lane Wilson’s response to the claims that he had been recalled by the State Department, saying that Wilson believes he has the friendship of nearly every American residing in Mexico, and that he does not consider the rumors important enough to officially deny.
ITEM 33Chihuahua Cut Off From Outside World, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that although railroads through Chihuahua have been interrupted, and no damage has been done to the lines, the city has enough provisions for approximately two months and is in no danger of attack. A reference to the failing economy is made. The article also announces that Madero has released a statement denying and relationship to the newspaper The Regeneración.
ITEM 34Plan to Attach Chihuahua: 3,000 Rebels Advancing – Americans Kidnapped in U. S. Territory, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 12: The article announces that the revolutionary troops are preparing for battle, and that two Americans were captured approximately 500 feet from the border on U.S. soil. References are made to the continued impact of the revolution on railroads through Chihuahua.
ITEM 35A Siege of Chihuahua, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 4: The article announces that although railroads through Chihuahua have been interrupted, and no damage has been done to the lines, the city has enough provisions for approximately two months and is in no danger of attack. The article also announces a telegram to Secretary Knox from American Consul at Juárez Mr. Edwards formally requesting the return of the captured Americans.
ITEM 36'More Taxes Every Year' Plaint of Mexican Rebels, March 6, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 8: The article includes a first-hand account of the revolution from the perspective of an educated revolutionary, Don Luis Chavez. The revolutionary describes the incessant taxation of the poor and the differences between the current revolution and past revolutions, including the fact that past revolutions consisted of hacendados revolting against the government with support from their peons. Chavez states that the peons have finally realized that their interests and the interests of the elites are not the same.
ITEM 37Take Chihuahua and Juarez: Then Ask Recognition by U.S. Is Madero’s Plan, March 7, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 4: The article announces fighting between federal and rebel troops near Torreon, and the intention of the rebel troops to take Chihuahua and Juárez before asking to be recognized the U.S.
ITEM 38Madero’s Forces Near Chihuahua: Insurrectos Expect to Make City Headquarters, March 7, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 3: The article announces fighting between federal and rebel troops near Torreon, and the intention of the rebel troops to take Chihuahua and Juárez before asking to be recognized the U.S. The article also claims the insurrectos hope to make Chihuahua City their capital.
ITEM 39800 Rifles Seized at Mexican Border, March 7, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 9: The article announces that the U.S. has seized 800 rifles and 2,000 rounds of ammunition that was to be delivered to the insurrectos.
ITEM 40Mexican Insurgents Want No Aid from ‘Gringoes, March 7, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 9: The article announces that the insurrectos are averse to American aid, and that they feel that the Díaz regime favored foreign investment over poor Mexicans.
ITEM 41Twenty Thousand American Troops and Eight War Ships; Rushed to Mexican Border as Part of Big ‘War Game’; England’s Threat Said to Have Caused the Great Move, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict.
ITEM 42Mobilization of the Army, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict.
ITEM 43England’s Part in the Dispatch of Troops, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article announces that government officials in England have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention.
ITEM 44Serious View in London: Statement Regarding Maneuvers Not Accepted by English Press, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that government officials in England have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention. The primary concern of England is revealed to be the economic interests of foreigners residing in Mexico.
ITEM 45No Alarm in Mexico: Minister Creel Denies That Powers Have Complained, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces that Minister of Foreign Affairs Enrique Creel has denied having heard any reports of property damage from Americans or other foreigners in Mexico. Mexico’s official response to the U.S. troops stationed at the border is discussed.
ITEM 46U.S. Rushes Troops to Mexican Border, March 8, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that government officials in Europe have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention. The primary concern of Great Britain and France is revealed to be the economic interests of foreigners residing in Mexico.
ITEM 4720,000 Troops and Two Naval Divisions to Mobilize Near Mexican Border, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that government officials in England have expressed an interest in U.S. troops getting involved in the revolution so as to avoid the necessity of European intervention. The primary concern of England is revealed to be the economic interests of foreigners residing in Mexico.
ITEM 48Troops Massed on Mexican Border, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict. The role of England in the decision to mobilize is discussed.
ITEM 49Great U.S. War Force in a Spectacular Dash to the Border of Mexico, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict. The role of England in the decision to mobilize, and U.S. consultation with the Díaz government are discussed.
ITEM 50On the Mexican Frontier, March 8, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 10: The article announces that troops have been positioned on the Mexican border, with many troops practicing in the gulf states.
ITEM 51Call Militia to War Game, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that troops have been positioned on the Mexican border, with many troops practicing along the Gulf state borders. Díaz’s health is addressed, and information is provided about Limantour’s recent meetings with local New York financiers and landowners in Mexico.
ITEM 52New Yorkers Figure in Mexican Problem: Minister Limantour Confers with Financiers Representing Vast Investments in Mexico, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 3: The article announces that the situation in Mexico is more serious than previously thought, and the property of American landowners is said to be at a great risk. Information is provided about Limantour’s recent meetings with local New York financiers and landowners in Mexico.
ITEM 53Taft is Not Acting on British Protest, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces that the London Foreign Service Office has not issued any demands to Washington regarding involvement in the revolution, and President Taft also denies acting on European pressure.
ITEM 54The Mexican Preparations, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 2: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict, and to express U.S. concern over the conflict in Mexico that is putting foreign property at risk.
ITEM 55Opposed to Intervention: Mexican Officials and Insurrecto Leaders Balk, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article discusses the issue of intervention from the perspective of Madero and the insurrectos. It states that official reports from Maderista officials assert that U.S. intervention would be inappropriate, and would mean war.
ITEM 56No Occasion for Alarm, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Hearld, p. 6: The article asserts that there is no reason for alarm, and that U.S. intervention in the Mexican conflict would be unnecessary.
ITEM 57Say Intervention Would Mean War, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Hearld, p. 4: The article asserts that there is no reason for alarm, and that U.S. intervention in the Mexican conflict would be unnecessary, and would mean war.
ITEM 58What the Mobilization Means, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Hearld, p. 10: The article announces that American troops have positioned themselves at the U.S. Mexican border to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict.
ITEM 59Mexico’s Finance Minister Sees No War Menace, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article asserts that José Yves Limantour believes that there is no reason for alarm, and that there is no chance of war. The article also references a statement by Francisco León de la Barra in which he claims that the revolution is only a "disturbance" in Chihuahua.
ITEM 60Our Troops on the Border, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article discusses the positioning of American troops on the Mexican border, and the role of foreign governments in the decision to bring the troops there. It also discusses the extent of the revolution in Mexico, acknowledging that the true extent of the revolution is not well known outside of the country.
ITEM 61Troops Off for Virginia on the Way to Texas, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 3: The article announces that troops on their way to Texas have passed through Jamestown, Virginia. It is also announced that the leading officer is acting strictly on commands issued from the War Department.
ITEM 62Why Are the Troops Sent? March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that the public is generally confused about the command. The article states that the official explanation that the government has issued describes the action simply as a series of maneuvers, however the amount of foreign investment in Mexico offers a different reasoning.
ITEM 63Mexican Councils Fluttered, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 2: The article announces that members of the Díaz government are not concerned about the uprisings in Mexico, nor about the U.S. troops massing near the border.
ITEM 64Diaz Recalls Reyes to Command Army? March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Hearld, p. 4: The article announces that Díaz has recalled General Bernard Reyes from Paris to lead the federal forces. It also references the U.S. mobilization of troops at the border, stating that the U.S. only intends to show that they would be prepared to involve themselves in the conflict if necessary.
ITEM 65President Diaz Dead is Report, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces the supposed death of Díaz, and asserts that the rumors regarding Mexican support for U.S. involvement are untrue.
ITEM 66Mexico Society's Members, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 10: The article states that while the Mexico Society of New York consists mainly of supporters of the Díaz regime, it was actually created by New York journalists who hoped to create an organization that would strengthen friendly relationships between the U.S. and Mexico.
ITEM 67Yankee Troops are Rushing Down, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that Díaz’s health is in decline, and that Great Britain has threatened personal involvement if the U.S. does not take action in Mexico.
ITEM 68Death of Diaz Reported, But Not Verified, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article announces that although the death of Díaz has been reported, neither affirmations nor denials of the report have been secured. References are also made to the 20,000 U.S. troops at the Mexican border.
ITEM 69Mexican Officials Confer in Gotham: De La Barra and Limantour Go Over Situation, March 9, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces that José Yves Limantour and Francisco León de la Barra have met to discuss current affairs, and have stated that Díaz is in good health, the revolution is under control, and the U.S. forces at the border are simply taking part in a series of maneuvers.
ITEM 70Dictator Diaz is Dying; Our Army to Crush Chaos if His Government Falls, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 10: The article announces that Díaz is dying, and that the U.S. troops could enter Mexico if the Díaz regime falls in order to protect foreign interests.
ITEM 71Aged Ruler of Southern Republic Reported to Have Suddenly Passed Away, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article announces that although the death of Díaz has been reported, neither affirmations nor denials of the report have been secured.
ITEM 72Map of the Border and Mexican Strategy Points, March 9, 1911
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 1: The article includes a map with indications of Mexican strategy points. References are made to the troops along the border, which are well prepared.
ITEM 73Fort Myer Officers Off to Mexico, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, (No page number located): The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that it was likely due to European pressure or false information from individuals posing as the Mexican government. The article references the quick mobilization of the troops, and their preparedness
ITEM 74U.S. Troops to Aid in Crushing Revolt, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 1,2: The article announces that the U.S. troops may offer aid in the revolution, on the command of U.S. President Taft. The reason for the mobilization of the U.S. troops at the Mexican border is discussed.
ITEM 75The Troops on the Border, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that the public is generally quiet about the command. The article states that the official explanation that the government has issued describes the action simply as a series of maneuvers, however the amount of foreign investment in Mexico may also be involved.
ITEM 76Expects an Invasion: Keifer Does Not Believe Army Mobilization Peaceful, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 2: The article announces that Representative Joseph Warren Keifer of Ohio claims that the mobilization of U.S. troops at the Mexican border is not for a series of maneuvers, but rather for another important reason that the President has not revealed.
ITEM 77Creel Wires World: Diaz is Well, Mexico Placid and Prosperous, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that Minister of Foreign Affairs Enrique Creel has written that Díaz’s health is well, and that there is no reason for concern in Mexico.
ITEM 78Army On Border to Stop Clash in Diaz Domain, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that President Taft’s officials have explained the mobilization of U.S. troops at the border as an attempt to stop the smuggling of weapons to insurrectos.
ITEM 79Taft to Stop Aid to Rebels and End Revolt, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that President Taft’s officials have explained the mobilization of U.S. troops at the border as an attempt to stop the smuggling of weapons to insurrectos.
ITEM 80Mr. Taft’s Duty to Mexico, March 10, 1911
Published in the New York Sun, p. 8: The article argues that President Taft has a duty to Mexico not to give sanctuary or assistance to rebels working against the Mexican government.
ITEM 81Troops Are Sent When Germany Threatens Action, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article discusses the reason for the mobilization of the troops, stating that it was likely due to German pressure and upholding the Monroe Doctrine. The article references the importance of protecting foreign interests in Mexico.
ITEM 82Madero Defeated With Great Loss, March 10, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 4: The article announces that after a battle at Old Casas Grandes, Madero was defeated and both the rebels and the federal troops suffered significant losses.
ITEM 83Tells of Secret Pact: Mexico, Financier Says, has Treaty With Japan, March 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 3: The article announces a secret pact between Mexico and Japan regarding an offensive and defensive alliance. The article asserts that a Mexican financier provided the information, but that it is expected that the Japanese government will deny it.
ITEM 84U.S. to Maintain Peace in Mexico at All Hazards, March 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Herald, p. 1: The article asserts that President Taft’s officials have explained the mobilization of U.S. troops at the border as an attempt to stop the smuggling of weapons to insurrectos. It also announces that Baron Uchida of Japan has denied any interest in involvement in the conflict.
ITEM 85A Dangerous Situation, March 11, 1911
Published in the Washington Post, p. 6: The article discusses the impact of the mobilization of the U.S. troops at the Mexican border, claiming that mobilization will either have been a costly expenditure that yielded no results, or interpreted as encouraging war.
ITEM 86To Patrol Mexican Coast: Cruiser Tacoma Ordered From Honduras, March 11, 1911
Published in the New york Sun, p. 1: The article announces that two scout cruiser vessels from Pensacola and Honduras have been ordered to patrol the Mexican coast.
ITEM 87No Danger of War, March 11, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 12: The article refers to American interests in Mexico, the need to be cautious with Mexican correspondence, and the conservative nature of President Taft, who holds the confidence of many Americans.
ITEM 88Taft and Knox Reported Split on Mexico Plan, March 11, 1911
Published in the New York Times, p. 1: The article announces that Secretary of State Knox and Acting Secretary Wilson disapprove of the mobilization of troops, but that army officials have stated that more troops may be mobilized under the command of President Taft. A dispatch from Díaz is included stating that his health is "perfect".
ITEM 89Mexican Envoy Wants No Troops to Cross Border, March 11, 1911
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