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Mexican Revolution newspaper clippings archive, 1911-1913

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FOLDER 4 February 8, 1912 - February 24, 1913
(115 items)
ITEM 1Madero Expects Speedy Peace: But Washington Is Worried by Widespread Disorder in Mexico, February 8, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p.3: The article includes correspondence from Madero, stating that the Zapatistas are of little concern and have been defeated multiple times. It is asserted that the U.S. is concerned that this rebellion could be worse than the previous, and is preparing its forces.
ITEM 2The Recognition of Mexican Rebels as Belligerents, February 13, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 6: The article announces that a new senator from New Mexico, A. B. Fall, has requested for the rebel groups in Mexico to be recognized as belligerents.
ITEM 3Says Intervention Would Be a Crime: Pan-American Union Director Says United States Should Not Antagonize Mexico or Cuba, February 12, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article discusses the opinion of John Barrett, director-general of the Pan-American Union of Washington, D.C., regarding the role of the U.S. in the conflicts in Mexico and Cuba. It is stated that he believes intervention would be a crime that would permanently damage relations between the U.S. and Latin America. A reference is also made to the economic opportunity presented by the Panama Canal.
ITEM 4Appeal From Mexico to British Power, February 21, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article announces that rebels have raided the land of British-owned company Sonora Mexico Land and Timber Company, Ltd., and the manager is seeking protection from the U.S, Mexico and Britain.
ITEM 5Anarchy in Mexico, American Consuls Say, February 22, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 9: The article announces that the State Department has received various reports from consuls throughout Mexico that the revolution has expanded, and is putting the property and lives of foreigners at risk.
ITEM 6May Make Chihuahua Independent Republic: Rebels at Juarez to Start South To-Morrow – Orozco for President, February 28, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, (No page number located): The article announces that rebels have reduced duties in Juárez to encourage trade, and that the Mexican government, if it takes Juárez, will be able to seize their goods. It is also stated that there are discussions of Chihuahua becoming independent, and the U.S. position is faced with a legal obligation to allow for the legitimate shipment of ammunition and supplies across the Mexican border.
ITEM 7Mexican Rebels Walk Into Juarez: Only a Few Shots Fired..., February 28, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 5: The article announces that Juárez was given to the rebels upon entry for fear of U.S. conflict, and that although a few shots were fired into El Paso, the U.S. troops did not see a need to take action.
ITEM 8A Mexican Rebel Success: Capture of Juarez, February 28, 1912
Published in the London Times, p. 5: The article announces that the rebels took Juárez with very little fighting, and that the U.S. is still concerned about the protection of American properties. It is stated that care was taken to avoid damaging American properties during the conflict.
ITEM 9Mexican Rebels Capture Juarez; Will Start March on the Capital To-Day, February 28, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that the rebels took Juárez with very little fighting, and that they intend to mark on the capital. It is also stated that Emilio Vasquez Gomez has been selected as provisional president, and that they intend to attack Chihuahua. Americans, it is asserted, are in "dire peril."
ITEM 10New Danger Spots in Mexican Situation, February 29, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p.3: The article announces that several exaggerated accounts of rebel activity in towns near Vera Cruz were reported to the State Department, and that they were of great concern due to the large number of American interests in the area. The opinion of a high official in the State Department is included, stating that Mexico’s degree of civilization was being questioned.
ITEM 11Rebel Army Will Begin Chihuahua Advance To-Day, March 2, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article announces that the rebel army under the command of General Inez Salazar will advance on Chihuahua, bringing skilled laborers with them to mend the railroads that had been burned.
ITEM 12Madero Ready to Die at Post: Appeals to American People to Unite for Peace, March 4, 1912
Published in the New York Evening Sun, (No page number located): The article announces that Madero’s call to the Mexican people to join his troops included a statement that he would be prepared to die at his post. It is also stated that Orozco has won at Chihuahua, and a reference is made to Francisco "Pancho" Villa.
ITEM 13Orozco Holds City of Chihuahua for Rebels, March 5, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article announces that Orozco is holding Chihuahua for reinforcements, and that Madero has asserted that he is willing to die to defend Mexico. It is also mentioned that Americans have become more concerned.
ITEM 14Mexican Troops Off to Fight Orozco, March 8, 1912
Published in the New York Times, p. 6: The article announces that the federal troops intend to fight Orozco, and that a regiment of cowboys in the U.S. is to be formed.
ITEM 15Taft Sends Two More Regiments to Border, March 8, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that President Taft will be sending two more regiments to the Mexican border to regulate the smuggling of arms and ammunition into Mexico. It is stated that the president is preparing to meet any emergency.
ITEM 16Warns Against Intervention: John Barrett Urges Patience With Mexico in Her Troubles, March 12, 1912
Published in the New York Times, (No page number located): The article announces that the Director General of the Pan-American Union, John Barrett, has continued to warn against intervention in Mexico during the revolution.
ITEM 17John Barrett Sees Plot to Incite Invasion of Mexico; Warns Country Move Would Ruin Prestige and Trade, March 12, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, p. 3: The article announces that the Director General of the Pan-American Union, John Barrett, has continued to warn against intervention in Mexico during the revolution. It includes his warning that intervention would be dangerous for Mexico’s economy, and that it would jeopardize the U.S.’s potential economic future with the Panama Canal.
ITEM 18President to Keep Hands Off Mexico, March 13, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article announces that President Taft has decided against intervening in Mexican affairs, and has removed the troops from the border. It emphasizes the importance of neutrality, and mentions that the rebel groups are in need of funds and have raised water prices.
ITEM 19As to Intervention in Mexico, March 14, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 8: The article discusses the U.S. decision not to intervene in Mexico unless the circumstances escalate, and asserts that there would never be a reason to intervene.
ITEM 20No Interference, March 14, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, p. 5: "No Interference" is an image of a personification of Mexico, depicted as an eagle on a cactus with a snake labeled "REBELLION AND DISORDER" in its mouth, across the Rio Grande from a vulture with a top hat of stars and stripes.
ITEM 21Power for Taft to Stop Gun Running: Senate Passes Resolution to Enforce Neutrality in Mexican Struggle, March 14, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that a resolution has been passed in the Senate to enforce neutrality in the Mexican conflict. Rumors are also revealed that Enrique Creel and General Terrazas of the Cientificos have secretly supported Orozco.
ITEM 22Creel Has No Part in Mexican Revolution, March 22, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article announces that Enrique Creel has denied any involvement in the revolution, and claims not to be politically involved. It is also stated that he believes Madero has the revolution under control.
ITEM 23A Dark Picture of Mexico: The Insurrection Led by Orozco Is of Cientifico Origin, March 26, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 8: The article features a letter from "American Resident" to the editor of The Sun, stating that the wealth of the Cientificos is what is currently fueling the revolution in Mexico.
ITEM 24Rules of War in Mexico, March 27, 1912
Published in the San Francisco Chronicle, p. 6: The article discusses the use of various forms of arms and ammunition in Mexico, and states that although Mexico is allowed to fight whomever they would like without harming foreigners, they are violating several international war regulations.
ITEM 25Enrique Creel Denies a Part in Revolution, March 29, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 6: The article announces that Enrique Creel has denied any involvement in the revolution, and claims not to be politically involved. Excerpts from his letter are included, in which he states that he will always side with the government on account of his status as a conservative businessman.
ITEM 26Needless Alarm About Mexico, March30, 1912
Published in the New York Times, p. 3: The article discusses the current situation in Mexico, referring to Orozco’s reported successes as unlikely, calling the Madero administration new and "badly nourished," and stating that rumors of Enrique Creel funding the rebels are ridiculous.
ITEM 27Crisis in Mexico; U.S. Arms Citizens, April 30, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 1: The article announces that the crisis in Mexico has led Madero to approve the distribution of rifles and cartridges from the U.S. embassy to Americans residing there. It is stated that the U.S. is only concerned for the safety of Americans.
ITEM 28Won’t Admit Plans to Move on Mexico: Stimson Maintains Secrecy Over Use of State Troops if Intervention Comes, April 1, 1912
Published in the New York Times, p. 4: The article announces that Secretary Stimson will not admit plans to move on Mexico, and remains secretive. It is revealed that Secretary Stimson is to have a conversation with General Edward Young of the Illinois National Guard the following day.
ITEM 29To Review Troops To-Day: Division at San Antonio to Provide Citizens with Military Spectacle, April 1, 1912
Published in the New York Times, (No page number found): The article announces that troops in San Antonio have not yet been informed of their assignment, but that the following day a "spectacle" is scheduled.
ITEM 30Americans Organize in Mexican Capital, April 2, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 6: The article announces that about 150 Americans met at the YMCA in Mexico City in fear that the Mexican government would confiscate their arms. It is also stated that the Mexican government has suppressed the newspaper Heraldo Mexicano.
ITEM 31Peace in Mexico Near, Says Madero, April 2, 1912
Published in the New York Press, (No page number located): The article states that U.S. intervention in Mexico would mean war, and that Madero has made an official statement that peace is near.
ITEM 32Mexican Officers in Plot to Stop Arms Sent by U.S., April 4, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 4: The article, the last piece of an article not included in the archive, asserts that the State Department is demanding a settlement of claims for damaged American property during the revolution. References are also made to a battle in Parral and an American held in Juarez.
ITEM 33Gen. Diaz ‘Hopes to Visit Mexico Again Shortly’, April 5, 1912
Published in the New York World, p. 1: The article announces that Díaz has stated that he would fight for Mexico’s independence if its sovereignty were compromised by foreign invasion. Regarding the revolution and Madero, the article includes his correspondence, which states that he declines to comment.
ITEM 34Playing With Fire, April 6, 1912
Published in the New York World, (No page number located): The article discusses the Taft Administration’s mobilization of forces in preparation for an emergency, and states that U.S. intervention will not solve the issue of political instability in Mexico.
ITEM 35Invasion of Mexico Decided Upon by Taft, Congressmen Declare After Visit to Him, April 6, 1912
Published in the New York American, (No page number located): The article announces that President Taft has decided upon an invasion of Mexico, and will only stop his plans if Madero and Orozco accept his terms.
ITEM 36Taft Advised by Gen. Wood to Act Now in Mexico, April 9, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 4: The article announces that President Taft has been advised by General Wood to quickly intervene in Mexico. It is also stated that de la Barra’s return with result in more revolutionary activity, because it is supposed that the Cientificos are funding the revolts.
ITEM 37Americans in City of Mexico Seek Aid of William R. Hearst to Get Arms for Protection, April 10, 1912
Published in the New York American, (No page number located): The article announces that U.S. citizens are refusing to pay $20 per rifle for protection in Mexico. A reference is made to European nations that have provided their citizens with free arms.
ITEM 38American in a Trap Shot Down by Rebels, April 11, 1912
Unknown Periodical: The article announces that U.S. citizen Albert Fountain has been killed in Parral for operating a machine gun on behalf of the rebels. It is stated that Pancho Villa offered Fountain the position after he lost his mining job.
ITEM 39Guatemala Fertile Field for Investors, April 11, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 5: The article discusses the untouched land in Guatemala, and its current and future economic potential. It is written with the goal of attracting U.S. investors.
ITEM 40Knox Warns Cubans Against Politicians, April 12, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 3: The article announces that Secretary of State Knox has spoken in Cuba and advised the people not to trust in a few politicians. References are made to the U.S.’s positive motives in its relationship with Cuba, and an explanation is provided regarding the Panama Canal.
ITEM 41Americans Shot Down in Parral by Rebel Sentence, April 14, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article discusses the murder of U.S. citizen Albert Fountain in Parral for operating a machine gun on behalf of the rebels. It is stated that Pancho Villa offered Fountain the position, and that he was killed by "ley fuga," where he was given the opportunity to escape. Later in the article, a reference is made to the rebels’ shortage in ammunition.
ITEM 42Mr. Taft Sends a Stiff Warning to Mexico and Rebels, April 15, 1912
Published in the New York World, p. 3: The article announces that President Taft has sent a warning to Mexico, stating that the Mexican government will be responsible for all property losses and murders of U.S. citizens in Mexico. The article also states that Acting Secretary of State Wilson has declared that there is no discussion of intervention.
ITEM 43The Warning to Mexico, April 15, 1912
Published in the The Washington Star, p. 6: The article announces that President Taft has sent a warning to Mexico, stating that the Mexican government will be responsible for all property losses and murders of U.S. citizens in Mexico.
ITEM 44Mexican Provocation, April 16, 1912
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article discusses the recent warning issued from the U.S. to Mexico, and states that the U.S. was within reason to admonish Mexico on the grounds that it has violated international law and American treaty rights.
ITEM 45Three Nations Hint They Will Act in Mexico if U.S. Delays, April 17, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 13: The article announces that England, Germany and France have threatened to involve themselves in the Mexican conflict as a result of their many losses during the revolution. It is stated that the Monroe Doctrine is at risk, and that the U.S. is almost obligated to intervene.
ITEM 46Mexican Critic of U.S.: Editor of ‘El Pais’ Says Recent Warning Was Impertinent, April 17, 1912
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 9: The article announces that "El Pais," an official publication in Mexico, has spoken against President Taft’s warning to Mexico, stating that the damage of property and the loss of lives of foreigners in Mexico is the fault of the revolutionists and not the Mexican government.
ITEM 47Mexico Resents ‘Admonitory’ Note from Washington, April 18, 1912
Published in the New York World, p. 13: The article announces that Madero has approved a statement against President Taft’s warning to Mexico, stating that the damage of property and the loss of lives of foreigners in Mexico is the fault of the revolutionists and not the Mexican government. A reference is also made to Mexican resentment over the harsh words used in the U.S. correspondence.
ITEM 48Mexico Flouts Ultimatum of United States: She Will Look After Her Own Affairs, April 18, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 13: The article announces that the Mexican government has issued a response stating that it will manage its own affairs, primarily seek to control the uprising, and try foreigners as it sees fit. It is stated that the particular U.S. citizen in question was involved in armed conflict against the Mexican government, and that the U.S. is not within its rights to issue an admonition to the Mexican government.
ITEM 49Knox Back in Capital; Tells Trip’s Results, April 18, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 10: The article announces that Secretary of State Knox has returned from a long trip through Latin America, stating that the misrepresentation of the U.S. in Latin America and the tendency to oppose reform for personal gain are serious issues.
ITEM 50International Safety Rules, April 18, 1912
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 6: The article discusses the safety standards of steamship standards, because the current laws in different countries vary drastically, and cause complications for international travel.
ITEM 51Madero’s Flat Defiance, April 18, 1912
Published in the Brooklyn Eagle, p. 4: The article presents an opinion on Madero’s response to the admonition issued by President Taft, and highlights Taft’s diplomacy and refers to Madero’s response as a "‘mind your own business’ note."
ITEM 52Root to Aid Mexico: Will Seek to Have Our Immigration Laws Modified, April 20, 1912
Published in the New York Tribune, p. 9: The article announces that Elihu Root is preparing legislation that will allow the U.S. to deport Mexican revolutionaries who are currently plotting against the Mexican government from U.S. soil. The article asserts that the legislation will secure U.S. neutrality.
ITEM 53Can’t Scare Your Uncle, April 20, 1912
Published in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, p. 1: The image depicts an image of a tall Uncle Sam with a patronizing smile, looking across a barbed wire fence at a short, angry Madero. Uncle Sam is saying, "Excuse me if I appear to smile," and Madero is saying, "You have no right to admonish me, see?"
ITEM 54U.S. Demands Orozco Release Americans, April 21, 1912
Published in the New York Sun, p. 13: The article announces that Orozco has incarcerated two Americans without cause in Chihuahua, and that the State Department has issued commands to Consul Letcher in Chihuahua to demand their immediate release.
ITEM 55Unprotected Americans Protest an Incompetent Chief Executive, April 26, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 24: The article discusses President Taft’s lack of action to protect U.S. interests in Mexico, and criticizes his policy of non-intervention by referring to him as an "incompetent chief executive".
ITEM 56Japanese Operations in Mexico Fully Revealed: New York American Sends Expedition to Scene, April 26, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 1: The article announces that Japan secured has secured from the Mexican government 700 miles of land along the coast, from Manzanillo to Salinas Cruz. References are made to colonization and the Japanese fisheries enterprise.
ITEM 57Urges American Diplomacy to End Mexican Revolt, April 26, 1912
Published in the New York Herald, (No page number located): The article announces that the editor of the Daily Mexican and La Prensa in Mexico City, Edward I. Bell, has stated that U.S. diplomacy is necessary, and the only alternative to intervention and war in Mexico. It is also stated that Europe will interfere if the U.S. does not.
ITEM 58Transport to Take 500 Americans Out of Mexico, April 27, 1912
Published in the New York World, p. 13: The article announces that the army boat Buford has been ordered to pick up 500 Americans on the western coast of Mexico. It is stated that although the Americans have not yet been affected, they are in consistent danger.
ITEM 59Just a Bit of Discipline--- By Henderson, April 27, 1912
Published in The Sun (Pittsburgh, PA), (No page number located): The image depicts a tall Uncle Sam pointing a finger at a small, young Mexico, saying "I’ve about come to the conclusion, young man, that you deserve a lickin".
ITEM 60Foreign Powers Rush War Boats to Mexican Coast, April 28, 1912
Published in The Courier (Buffalo, NY), (No page number located): The article announces that Britain, France and Germany have sent war boats to the Mexican coast to protect the life and property of their citizens. It is stated that President Taft has warned that any intervention will lead to the immediate killings of foreign citizens in Mexico.
ITEM 61Madero’s New Ambassador Won’t Present Credentials; Presence Called an Insult, April 30, 1912
Published in the New York American, p. 13: The article announces that the former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Manuel Colero, plans to leave the U.S. without meeting with the Department of State as a result of his insulting reply to President Taft’s admonition. The article also states that troops are being prepared for a conflict in the greatest mobilization since the Spanish-American war.
ITEM 62Mexican Police Seize Rifles Sent by U.S., April 30, 1912
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