15 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Abolitionists.

  1. Joseph R. Hawley papers, 1638-1906

    13,200 items ; 45 containers ; 13.6 linear feet ; 29 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Army officer, editor and United States representative and senator from Connecticut. Correspondence, diaries, notebooks, drafts of speeches, business papers, and memorabilia relating to Hawley's personal and family life and to his business and political work.

  2. Benjamin Tappan papers, 1795-1900

    3,650 items ; 25 containers ; 6 linear feet ; 11 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Jurist and United States senator. Correspondence, speeches, legal and business records, and genealogical material relating to Ohio and national politics, antislavery movement, family matters, and Tappan's interests in mineralogy and conchology.

  3. James Gillespie Birney papers, 1830-circa 1895

    22 items ; 1 container ; 0.2 linear feet ; 1 microfilm reel. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Abolitionist and editor. Correspondence, diaries, a notebook, and newspaper clippings primarily concerning Birney's participation in the antislavery movement.

  4. Blackwell family papers, 1759-1960

    29,000 items ; 96 containers ; 40 linear feet ; 76 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family members include author and suffragist Alice Stone Blackwell (1857-1950); her parents, Henry Browne Blackwell (1825-1909) and Lucy Stone (1818-1893), abolitionists and advocates of women's rights; her aunt, Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910), the first woman to receive an academic medical degree; and Elizabeth Blackwell's adopted daughter, Kitty Barry Blackwell (1848-1936). Includes...

  5. Esther Hill Hawks papers, 1856-1867

    515 items ; 1 container ; .4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Physician, educator, and abolitionist. Correspondence and other papers relating to the work of Hawks and her husband caring for sick and wounded soldiers, including African Americans, in South Carolina during the Civil War, and as a teacher of African Americans in South Carolina and Florida during the Civil War and Reconstruction era.

  6. Theodore Parker papers, 1838-1910

    180 items ; 1 container ; .2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Unitarian clergyman, theologian, author, and abolitionist. Correspondence, writings, poetry, and printed material relating to Parker's antislavery lectures and to the publication of his biography and collected writings.

  7. John Keep papers, 1781-1929

    15 items ; 2 containers ; 0.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Clergyman and abolitionist. Autobiography, correspondence, record book, newspaper clippings, notes, speeches, and a Bible relating to Keep and his family.

  8. Lewis Tappan papers, 1809-1903

    5,200 items ; 15 containers ; 10 linear feet ; 7 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Abolitionist, merchant, and publisher. Correspondence, journals, and other papers reflecting Tappan's interests in abolition, African-American education, religion, and his business ventures.

  9. Henry Ward Beecher papers, 1836-1886

    5,400 items ; 18 containers ; 9 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Abolitionist, author, and Congregationalist clergyman. Primarily drafts of Beecher’s sermons and a small amount of correspondence, seminary notes, notes for speeches and lectures, other writings, and miscellaneous material.

  10. Joshua R. Giddings and George Washington Julian papers, 1839-1899

    900 items ; 7 containers ; 1.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States representative from Ohio, abolitionist, and consul general to Canada (Joshua R. Giddings); United States representative from Indiana and biographer (George Washington Julian). Chiefly family letters of Giddings and Julian, together with some political correspondence. Topics include Ohio and Indiana politics and the abolition of slavery.