11 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Advertisements.

  1. Columbia Records paperwork collection, 1923-1964

    52 linear feet (159 boxes, approximately 55,650 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Record label orders, record label copy sheets, press release information, recording studio job sheets, and cut-out project information from Columbia Records.

  2. Jim Walsh papers, 1867-1987, and undated

    23.58 linear feet (17 boxes, 1 map case folder, approximately 12,860 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The papers consist of correspondence, research files, photographs, scrapbooks, and other materials that form part of a larger collection of sound recordings and audio equipment assembled by journalist, radio host, and early recording collector Jim Walsh.

  3. Jascha Heifetz papers, 1786-1991

    approximately 17, 500 items. 280 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Russian-American musician Jascha Heifetz was a virtuosic violinist who became a dedicated teacher. The collection includes his personal music library of original compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions. Concert programs document his performances from 1911 to 1974, and photographs, photo albums, and scrapbooks span the violinist's entire life. The correspondence contains letters from significant twentieth-century musical figures such as Leopold Auer, Benjamin Britten, Sergei Prokofiev, George Bernard Shaw, and Sir William Walton.

  4. Charles Mingus collection, 1925-2015

    approximately 15,000 items. 76 boxes. 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Charles Mingus was a jazz double bassist, band leader, and composer. A prolific recording artist and pioneer in double bass technique, Mingus composed works that often incorporated elements of hard bop and gospel music and featured collective improvisation. The collection includes manuscript and printed music by Mingus; writings; correspondence; business papers; clippings; programs; publicity materials; photographs of Mingus, his family, and colleagues, such as Eric Dolphy, Dannie Richmond, Max Roach, Oscar Pettiford, and Miles Davis; artwork and artifacts; and sound recordings.

  5. Burl Ives collection, 1919-1965

    1600 items. 16 containers. 15 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Burl Ives was a singer, author, and a film, television and theater actor. The collection primarily relates to Ives's career in radio and television and on the concert stage. It includes articles by and about Ives, press and publicity materials relating to various radio and television shows, and to concerts and tours, correspondence, scripts, contracts, fan mail, financial materials, rehearsal schedules, photographs, and clippings.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Les Paul papers, 1904-2003

    6,300 items. 44 containers. 22.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Les Paul was a Grammy-winning musician and inventor known for his virtuosic guitar playing, pioneering of multitrack recording, and invention of the solid-body electric guitar. His inventions left an indelible impact on the music industry. In addition to live concerts he performed on the radio and on television, notably with his second wife, singer and guitarist Mary Ford. The Les Paul Papers contain music arranged for Les Paul's ensembles by himself or others and printed sheet music of popular songs. The collection also contains publicity materials, business papers, schematics, scripts, brochures, photographs, and correspondence.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  7. John Philip Sousa collection, 1849-2004

    approximately 9,000 items. 96 containers. 14 mapcase folders. 48.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Though composer, arranger, and conductor John Philip Sousa is best known for his marches, his oeuvre also includes many songs, dances, overtures, suites, fantasies, and operettas, among others. The collection consists largely of holograph full scores for band and orchestra, but there are also some parts, sketches, and printed scores, as well as works by other composers. The business papers document the operations of John Philip Sousa, Inc., primarily after his death. The collection also includes photographs, book drafts, and miscellaneous items featuring Sousa and The Sousa Band.

  8. American Conservatory at Fontainebleau records, 1922-2022

    approximately 23,500 items. 71 containers. 36 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The American Conservatory at Fontainebleau was originally established in 1919 to improve the quality of United States military bands mobilized in France at the end of World War I. In 1921, the school opened to American civilians, welcoming music students for summer classes in the Louis XV wing of the Château de Fontainebleau. The School of Fine Arts was established in 1923, and architecture has become the focus of its instruction. Still active today, the Conservatory's faculty has featured prominent musicians such as Maurice Ravel, Nadia Boulanger, and Francis Poulenc, and notable alumni include Philip Glass, Donald Grantham, Adolphus Hailstork, and Louise Talma. Though student applications comprise the bulk of the records, there are also publicity materials, other administrative records, and publications documenting the activities of the Fontainebleau Alumni Association.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  9. Edward Cogan correspondence, 1935-1941

    approximately 121 items. 1 container. 1 linear foot. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Edward Cogan Correspondence documents aspects of Cogan's career as leader of the Hill Billy Boys, a young, New Jersey-based mountain music band that performed on Major Bowes’ Original Amateur Hour and did tours for Major Bowes from 1935 to 1936. Correspondence is primarily between Edward Cogan and his family, friends, and associates.

  10. Patent medicine labels and advertisements (Library of Congress)

    ca. 420 prints : engravings, etchings, lithographs, b&w and color ; 33 x 43 cm. or smaller.. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    These patent medicine labels and advertisements depict various subjects while advertising nineteenth century medicines.