8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) African American musicians.

  1. National Visionary Leadership Project interviews and conference collection, 1997-2009

    33 boxes. transcripts: 15 v. : col. ill. ; 22 cm.. 288 transcripts, unbound. manuscripts, 4 folders. 1026 videocassettes (Betacam, DVCAM, Mini-DV) : sound, color, various sizes. 7 videocassettes (VHS) : sound, color.. 12 video discs (CD-ROM) : sound, color.. artifact : 1 medal. 868 photographs prints : color ; 4 x 6.. 3351 photographs : digital, jpeg files, color.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The National Visionary Leadership Project Interviews and Conference Collection consists primarily of master recordings of interviews by the National Visionary Leadership Project with significant figures in 20th century African American history. In addition, the collection includes transcripts (both printed and electronic) of a portion of the interviews, edited versions of the interviews and print and digital photographs.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  2. Kendrick-Brooks family papers, 1831-2000

    11,500 items. 33 containers plus 1 oversize. 13.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Club women, civil rights activists, educators, entertainers, and family members. Correspondence, social club records, writings, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous papers relating primarily to Ruby Moyse Kendrick's activities with the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs; Hattie Kendrick's civil rights activism in Cairo, Illinois; Antoinette Brooks Mitchell's expatriate life in England and France with her husband, jazz musician and restaurateur Louis A. Mitchell; and Charlotte Kendrick Brooks's histories of the Kendrick and Brooks families.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  3. Henry William Parsons papers, 1871-1887

    45 items. 2 containers. .4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    English Congregational minister and temperance advocate. Diaries and correspondence documenting his temperance work for the International Order of Good Templars with African Americans in North Carolina, as well as his ministerial work in England and the United States, and his travels with the Fisk Jubilee Singers during their European tour of 1878.

  4. Luther Henderson papers, circa 1930-2003

    approximately 17,250 items. 134 containers. 56 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Luther Henderson was an American arranger, orchestrator, conductor, music director, and composer. He worked on over fifty Broadway musicals, including Ain't Misbehavin' and Jelly's Last Jam. He was a frequent arranger and orchestrator for Duke Ellington. The collection contains music manuscripts, correspondence, business and financial papers, photographs, promotional materials, clippings, realia, and other materials related to his career.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  5. National Negro Opera Company collection, 1879-1997

    11,250 items. 68 containers. 39 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The National Negro Opera Company, the first African-American opera company in the United States, was founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1941, by Mary Cardwell Dawson. The collection contains materials and records related to the company and to Dawson. It includes correspondence, administrative and financial records, photographs, programs, promotional and publicity materials, scrapbooks, clippings, address books, notebooks, music, and books. In addition, the collection contains materials related to opera singer La Julia Rhea, who performed with the company, and Walter M. Dawson, Mary Cardwell Dawson's husband, who worked for the company.

  6. Max Roach papers, 1880-2012

    approximately 98,750 items. 195 containers. 122 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Max Roach was an American jazz drummer, composer, educator, and activist. The collection includes music manuscripts, writings, correspondence, business papers, photographs, programs, sound recordings, and other materials related to his career. It also contains a variety of materials pertaining to vocalist Abbey Lincoln and countless other jazz artists, including Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Charles Mingus, and Charlie Parker.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  7. Pete Welding collection, 1958-1995

    approximately 7865 items. 5091 sheets (16.25 linear feet). 832 sound tape reels ; various sizes. approximately 760 photographic prints and contact sheets : black-and-white ; various sizes . 1066 negatives : black-and-white negatives and copy negatives . approximately 113 slides and negatives: color ; 35 mm . 3 drawings . -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of over eight hundred sound tape reels, including blues and jazz music and interviews with musicians; several hundred photographs of prominent blues and jazz musicians, primarily from the 1960s and 1970s; manuscript materials about blues and jazz musicians, arranged by the name of performer; and articles, drafts, and notes written by Pete Welding, journalist, record producer, and historian of blues music.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  8. Tom Hoskins collection, 1963-1967

    58 sound tape reels : analog ; 7 in.. 31 sound tape reels : analog ; 10 in.. 4 videocassettes.. 1 film reel (16mm) : polyester.. approximately 100 photographs : black and white, prints ; various sizes.. 21 35mm color slides.. approximately 730 items.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of field recordings, studio recordings, and dubs and production masters of performances by blues guitarist Mississippi John Hurt, from the time of Hurt's initial meeting with Tom Hoskins, at Hurt's home in Avalon, Mississippi in March 1963 through various sessions and events from 1963-1965. The collection resulted from Tom Hoskins' relationship with Mississippi John Hurt over the next few years and includes Hoskins' interviews and photographs of John Hurt and his home; includes original letters from John Hurt and Jessie Hurt, with Hoskins' collection of various published articles and ephemera about Mississippi John Hurt, dated 1963-1999. John Hurt and his family moved to Washington, D.C. and he became a popular performer in the blues revival, coffeehouse, and folk music circuits. The collection includes an interview and performances by John Hurt recorded in the Coolidge Auditorium at the Library of Congress, in Washington, D.C. over several days in July, 1963. John Hurt and his family returned to Mississippi in 1966 and Hurt died soon after, on November 2, 1966. A selection from the March 1963 field recordings was issued in 2011 as the album Discovery: The Rebirth of John Hurt, March 3, 1963. Spring Fed Records.