39 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) African Americans--Civil rights.

  1. Roy Wilkins papers, 1901-2001

    28,700 items. 78 containers. 31.3 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Civil rights leader and journalist. Correspondence, memoranda, diary, manuscripts of speeches, newspaper columns, and articles, subject files, reports, minutes, committee, board, and administrative material, printed material, and other papers relating primarily to Wilkins's career with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in various positions between 1931 and 1977, especially his service as executive director (1965-1977).

  2. Hugh H. Smythe and Mabel M. Smythe papers, circa 1895-1997

    38,900 items. 112 containers plus 4 oversize and 2 classified. 45.5 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomats, educators, and scholars. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, photographs, reports, writings, subject files, and other papers relating to the Smythes' ambassadorships to Cameroon, Malta, and Syria and their work on African and African American issues with a variety of organizations and educational institutions.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  3. Lorenzo J. Greene papers, 1680-1988

    46,200 items. 106 containers plus 9 oversize. 42.8 linear feet. 2 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    African-American historian, educator, editor, and civil rights and social activist. Chiefly academic files documenting Greene's career as a professor of history and pioneer in the field of African-American studies at Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters records, 1920-1968

    41,000 items. 144 containers. 70 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Part I consists of general correspondence, subject files, and personal papers of the brotherhood's founder, A. Philip Randolph, documenting the growth and functions of the union chiefly after 1940. Part II consists of correspondence and subject files of brotherhood officials Benjamin F. McLaurin (international field organizer), A. Philip Randolph (founder and president), and Ashley L. Totten (secretary-treasurer), and other subject files, financial records, and miscellaneous records.

  5. Louis Martin papers, 1931-1998

    4,525 items. 13 containers. 5.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Civil rights activist, political adviser, newspaper columnist, and newspaper publisher. Correspondence, memoranda, subject files, speeches, and writings relating to Martin's civil rights activities, his journalism career, and his role as an adviser to presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Jimmy Carter.

  6. J. Skelly Wright papers, 1933-1987

    85,100 items. 243 containers. 120.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Attorney, judge, and educator. Personal and professional correspondence, case files, opinions, memoranda, reports, speeches and writings, financial papers, teaching material, clippings, printed matter, and photographs relating primarily to Wright's legal and judicial career.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  7. A. Philip Randolph papers, 1909-1979

    13,000 items. 56 containers plus 4 oversize. 23.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Labor union official and civil rights leader. Correspondence, documents relating to presidential executive orders, memoranda, notes, printed matter, reports, scrapbooks, speeches, and other material reflecting Randolph's role in the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the Fair Employment Practices Committee, marches on Washington for employment and equal rights for African Americans, and the civil rights movement.

  8. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People records, 1842-2019

    3,827,000 items. 10,969 containers plus 1 classified and 53 oversize. 4,855 linear feet. 43 microfilm reels. 7,919 digital files (136.63 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Civil rights organization. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, itineraries, speeches, testimonies, writings, legal case files, legislation, publications, resolutions, policy statements, constitutions, bylaws, charters, contracts, proposals, scripts, manuals, handbooks, music, awards, certificates, directories, daily mail sheets, notes, lists, questionnaires and surveys, flags, photographs, maps, subject files, annual convention files, biographical material, financial records, and publicity files in both physical and digital formats. Materials in digital format also includes software, databases, videos, and radio programs.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  9. James Free papers, 1929-1996

    2,950 items. 9 containers plus 1 oversize. 4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist. Story files and scrapbooks of clippings of Free's articles for various newspapers, especially as Washington, D.C., correspondent for the Birmingham News covering the civil rights movement and the Cold War.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  10. Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1944-1952

    250 items. 1 container. 0.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    African-American civil rights leader and educator. Correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, speeches, organizational newsletters, and newspaper clippings documenting Hedgeman's activities on behalf of civil rights for African Americans and educational reform, and especially her efforts to continue the work of the United States Fair Employment Practices Committee following World War II.