3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) African Americans--Mississippi.

  1. James Forman papers, 1848-2005

    79,000 items. 255 containers plus 2 oversize. 100.2 linear feet. 1 digital file (1.09 MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, journalist, and civil rights activist. Correspondence, memoranda, diaries, subject files, speeches and writings, family papers, appointment books and calendars, and other papers relating primarily to Forman's activities as executive secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and president of the Unemployment and Poverty Action Committee.

  2. Benjamin T. Montgomery family papers, 1872-1987

    15 items. 1 container. .4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Papers relating to Benjamin T. Montgomery, his son Isaiah T. Montgomery, other children and grandchildren, and material concerning the African American towns of Davis Bend and Mound Bayou, Mississippi. Benjamin T. Montgomery was born into slavery, enslaved by Joseph Davis (older brother of Jefferson Davis), manager and later owner of Davis Bend, Mississippi, and an inventor. Isaiah Montgomery founded Mound Bayou, Mississippi. Diary, speeches, biographical essays, and printed matter concerning Mound Bayou.

  3. Library of Congress and Fisk University Mississippi Delta collection, 1941-1943

    493 items ; 1 container plus 1 oversize ; 4 linear feet.. 350 manuscript items.. 10 sound discs : analog, 78 rpm, mono. ; 12 in.. 87 sound discs : analog, 78 rpm, mono. ; 16 in.. 46 negative prints : black and white ; 54 x 37 cm and smaller.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of a portion of the materials generated by a joint field project -- the Coahoma County, Mississippi, field project, 1941-1942 -- undertaken by Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge of the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress, and Fisk University faculty members including Charles S. Johnson, John Wesley Work, and Lewis Wade Jones. Field recordings were made of secular and religious music, sermons, children's games, jokes, folktales, interviews, and dances documenting the expressive culture of an African American community in Coahoma County, Mississippi. Some audio recordings were made by Alan Lomax and John W. Work at Work's home in Nashville, Tennessee; and a few were recorded by Lomax in Arkansas. The collection includes recording logs, reports, and correspondence related to the project. Also included are negative photostats of song transcriptions by John W. Work (1943), including some songs that were recorded on this project.