3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Airplanes--Design and construction.

  1. L'Aerophile collection, 1876-1949

    152 boxes. 15,000 items. -- Science, Technology, and Business Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, blueprints and manufactures information for early French and foreign aircraft and dirigibles, reports of accidents involving flyers and balloonists, World War I aerial photographs and intelligence reports, a series of French cartoons, drawings, graphs, charts, diagrams of equipment, maps, newspapers, printed material, and photographs. The materials in the collection were evidently assembled by staff of the magazine L’Aerophile which was published by Georges Besançon in collaboration with Union Aérophile de France. Subjects include aeronautics chiefly in Europe and the U.S., aeronautics corporations, air shows, aviators, balloons, bombs and missiles, commercial airlines, dirigibles, gliders, hydroplanes, medical aviation, military aeronautics, model aircraft, parachutes, propellers, record flights, and research and testing of aircraft. Individuals represented include Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold, Georges Besançon, Amelia Earhart, Charles Lindbergh, and William "Billy" Mitchell.

  2. Grover Cleveland Loening papers, 1900-1975

    25,800 items. 72 containers. 34.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Businessman, engineer, airplane manufacturer, and author. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, plans and drawings, notes, photographs, patents, legal documents, speeches and writings, scrapbooks, clippings, and printed matter documenting Loening's career in aviation.

  3. Arthur Woods papers, 1884-1938

    150 items. 1 container plus 6 oversize. 1.4 linear feet. 3 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Police commissioner and military officer. Diary, correspondence, reports, notes, scrapbooks, clippings, and photographs chiefly documenting the service of Arthur Woods as New York City police commissioner, colonel in the Division of Military Aeronautics, United States War Department, and assistant to the secretary of war.