4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) American Anti-Slavery Society.

  1. Scrap books compiled by Thompson and Chesson

    19 scrapbooks. Linear feet of shelf space occupied: 3. Approximate number of items: 2500 . -- Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection comprises of 19 scrapbooks consisting of newspaper clippings from various sources documenting the activities of George D. Thompson and writings by F.W. Chesson. The volumes also include handwritten notes by Thompson, pamphlets and handbills, letters to the editor, newspaper reports, essays and book reviews written by Chesson. The first six volumes, (volumes 1-6 of the scrapbooks) were compiled between 1835-1846 by George Donisthorpe Thompson (1804-1878), British abolitionist, lecturer and antislavery activist. Thompson founded the Edinburgh Society for the Abolition of Slavery Throughout the World in 1833. He worked with William Lloyd Garrison, John Greenleaf Whittier and other members of the American Anti-Slavery Society and was instrumental in establishing early abolitionist societies in both the United Kingdom and the United States. In 1847, Thompson was elected as a Member of Parliament where he served until 1852. The collection also comprises of 13 volumes (volumes 7-19 of the scrapbooks) compiled between 1854-1886 by Frederick William Chesson (1833 or 1834-1888), English journalist, influential anti-slavery proponent and secretary of the London Aborigines’ Protection Society. In 1855, Chesson married Amelia Thompson, the daughter of George Thompson. Together in 1859, F.W. Chesson and George Thompson founded the London Emancipation Society. Call number: E449.S43

  2. Elizur Wright papers, 1793-1935

    5,300 items. 29 containers. 8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Reformer, publisher, and actuary. Correspondence, manuscript and typewritten transcripts of writings, legal and financial papers, scrapbooks, clippings, printed material, photographs, and other papers relating chiefly to Wright’s involvement in the antislavery movement and to his work as an actuary and as an author and translator.

  3. Lewis Tappan papers, 1809-1903

    5,200 items. 15 containers. 10 linear feet. 7 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Abolitionist, merchant, and publisher. Correspondence, journals, and other papers reflecting Tappan's interests in abolition, African-American education, religion, and his business ventures.

  4. Susan B. Anthony papers, 1846-1934

    500 items. 7 containers. 3 linear feet. 7 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Reformer and suffragist. Correspondence, diaries, daybook, speeches, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous papers relating primarily to Anthony's writings, lectures, and other efforts on behalf of women's suffrage and women's rights. Includes material pertaining to the National Woman Suffrage Association, after 1890 the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and to the New York State Woman Suffrage Association.