67 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) American literature.

  1. Marian S. Carson collection of manuscripts, 1656-1995

    14,250 items. 57 containers plus 27 oversize. 26.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collector. A collection of Americana including historical letters and documents, family and personal papers, broadsides, financial and legal papers, illustrated and printed ephemera, government and legislative documents, military records, journals, and printed matter relating primarily to the expansion and development of the United States from the colonial period through the 1876 centennial.

  2. Ralph Ellison papers, 1890-2005

    74,800 items. 314 containers plus 25 oversize. 143 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    African-American author and educator. General correspondence, organizational correspondence and reports, family papers, drafts, notes, and production files for novels, essays, poetry, short stories, reviews, and other writings, speeches, lectures, and interviews, reference file, and miscellany documenting Ellison's career and development as a writer. Among the many works represented are Going to the Territory (1985), Invisible Man (1952), Shadow and Act (1964), and the second novel Ellison left unpublished at his death.

  3. William Dudley Foulke papers, circa 1470-1952

    2,500 items. 12 containers plus 1 oversize. 5.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, public official, and author from Indiana. Correspondence, diaries, journals, copybook, speeches, writings, notes, legal papers, clippings, printed material, and other papers, including a late fifteenth century fragment of the Tristram Saga obtained by Arthur Middleton Reeves on a trip to Iceland. The bulk of the collection consists of Foulke's correspondence reflecting his literary career and public service, including letters from Theodore Roosevelt discussing civil service reform, the Progressive movement, Woodrow Wilson, the World Court (Permanent Court of International Justice), and pacifism.

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    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. Gordon Parks papers, 1946-1991

    7,900 items. 39 containers plus 4 oversize. 15.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Photographer, writer, filmmaker, and composer. Contracts, correspondence, financial records, production material, and scripts relating to Parks's books, films, speeches, and other writings.

  5. Horace Traubel and Anne Montgomerie Traubel papers, 1824-1979

    75,600 items. 218 containers plus 2 oversize. 88.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Poet, critic, and friends and biographer of Walt Whitman. Correspondence, diaries, including Horace Traubel's diary published as With Walt Whitman in Camden, literary files containing prose, poetry, criticism, and other writings by the Traubels and other writers, including the collected files of the Conservator, financial and legal records, scrapbooks, and printed matter. The collection reflects the Traubels' support of the literary and artistic community, the arts and crafts and ethical culture movements, and social and political reform. Also includes the papers of their daughter, Gertrude Traubel, as well as their friends and financial supporters, Frank and Mildred Bain.

  6. Val Lewton papers, 1919-2007

    175 items. 4 containers plus 4 oversize. 6.4 linear feet. 5 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Motion picture producer, screenwriter, and novelist. Correspondence, film scripts, scrapbooks, and other papers pertaining chiefly to Lewton's career as a publicity writer and as a story editor for David O. Selznick at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (1928-1942); as scriptwriter and producer of Cat People and other horror films for RKO Radio Pictures (1942-1947); and as novelist, especially as author of No Bed of Her Own (1932).

  7. Walt Whitman papers in the Charles E. Feinberg collection, 1763-1985

    28,000 items. 239 containers plus 53 oversize. 96.6 linear feet. 38 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collector. Correspondence, literary manuscripts, diaries, commonplace books, notes and notebooks, and other papers of Walt Whitman collected by Feinberg. Also contains material relating to Whitman's life and writings including the papers of Richard Maurice Bucke, Charles E. Feinberg, John Johnston, William Douglas O'Connor, and Horace and Anne Montgomerie Traubel.

  8. Alexander King papers, 1953-1987

    1,920 items. 25 containers. 9.5 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, illustrator, and storyteller. Correspondence, writings, business papers, scrapbooks, and photographs relating to King's literary works, television appearances, relations with colleagues in the fields of art, literature, and entertainment, social life in New York, N.Y., and fund-raising efforts for kidney dialysis facilities. Some correspondence concerns housing discrimination against Jews in Connecticut.

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    Some or all content stored offsite.

  9. Walt Whitman papers, 1837-1957

    150 items. 2 containers plus 2 oversize. 1.2 linear feet. 2 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Poet. Correspondence, family papers, holograph drafts of Whitman's poetry and prose, printed matter, and miscellany. Includes a printed copy of O Captain! My Captain! with Whitman's handwritten corrections and letters exchanged with Abraham Leech, Whitman's earliest known correspondence.

  10. Bernard Malamud papers, 1930-1989

    13,000 items. 77 containers. 30.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author. Part I contains correspondence, drafts, memoranda, manuscripts, notes and outlines, legal and financial records, printed matter, and other papers relating to Malamud's life and work as a novelist and short story writer, including his relations with editors, literary agents, and publishers, his work on theatrical and motion picture adaptations, his defense of free speech, and his support of the artistic community. Part II supplements the topics and files in Part I and also includes notes and outlines for classroom lectures given by Malamud at Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont, and drafts and notes for public lectures and readings.