6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Anti-communist movements--United States.

  1. National Council of Jewish Women. Washington, D.C., Office records, 1924-2018

    239,200 items. 627 containers plus 1 oversize. 261 linear feet. 261 digital files (4.80 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Liaison office between the National Council of Jewish Women and the United States Congress and government agencies. Correspondence, minutes, reports, legislation, speeches, testimony, photographs, and printed matter related to various social justice causes in both physical and digital formats. Materials in digital format also include video advertisements and programs.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  2. National Council of Jewish Women records, 1893-2019

    63,000 items. 259 containers plus 1 oversize. 109.7 linear feet. 3 digital files (144.20 MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Jewish women’s voluntary organization focused on advocacy efforts related to women, children and families in both the United States and Israel. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, transcripts of proceedings, reports, reference material, official publications, speeches, testimony, photographs, printed matter, and other records chiefly documenting the organization's activities in both physical and digital formats.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  3. Halsey McGovern papers, 1945-1983

    75 items. 5 containers. 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Freight rate specialist and political commentator. Chiefly scrapbooks containing correspondence, church bulletins, greeting cards, magazine articles, mailing lists, newsletters, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, poetry, prayer cards, press releases, invitations, telegrams, and photographs pertaining to McGovern's political views and the civil rights movement. Also included are newsletters and a booklet.

  4. Victoria Phillips collection, 1914-2011

    Approximately 3,914 items. 24 containers. 12 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Victoria Phillips (formerly Phillips Geduld), a historian and faculty member at Columbia University, specializes in Cold War history, cultural diplomacy, and international relations. The Victoria Phillips Collection includes materials assembled by the scholar during her doctoral research and other curatorial and research projects. Most of the 3,900-plus items are reproductions of newspaper articles, correspondence and financial reports, photographs, publications, interview notes and transcripts, and FBI files on artists and public figures. Copies of Phillips's publications based on this research are also included. Collection strengths include research on the Martha Graham Dance Company from 1942 to about 1960 (especially records of tours abroad) as well as New Dance Group performances and dancers.

  5. Herbert A. Philbrick papers, 1849-1997

    126,000 items. 290 containers plus 1 oversize plus 1 top secret. 116 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Anticommunist activist and counterspy. Correspondence, writings, speeches, television scripts, subject files, and other papers relating primarily to Philbrick's role as a leading anticommunist spokesman, his activities as an informant for the Federal Bureau of Investigation while he was a member of the Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA), and the television program based on his autobiography, I Led 3 Lives: Citizen, “Communist,” Counterspy.

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    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. M & S Collection of American radical extremist literature of the 20th century, 1934-1981

    5,500 items. 84 boxes. -- Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The M & S Collection of American Radical Extremist Literature of the 20th Century's diversity is a reflection of this medley of American radical views. The collection documents the activities of extremist groups and their visions of the good community from 1934 to 1981, with the majority of the material centering on the years 1950 to 1981. The Collection embraces a vast number of subjects in a wide range of formats and genres, including broadsides, pamphlets, books, newspapers, newsletters, magazines, subscription and membership cards, order blanks, petitions, catalogs, advertisements, article reprints, and bumper stickers. The collection is strongest in printed ephemera: fund-raising letters, rally flyers, book order-forms, stickers, membership flyers, and propaganda pieces produced by many sorts of radical Americans. These materials chronicle the activities of radical groups, rallying, funds raising, propagandizing, theorizing, and petitioning.