14 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Architectural drawings.

  1. Maxine Glorsky papers relating to Martha Graham, 1940-2019

    3,455 items. 31 containers. 18 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection of Maxine Glorsky focuses on her relationship with the Martha Graham Dance Company as its stage manager during the 1970s and early 1980s. It also incorporates substantial material from Jean Rosenthal, Graham’s lighting designer during the 1940s and 1950s. The collection includes many cue sheets for both stage management and lighting purposes, lighting plots, related technical materials, business papers for Glorsky’s Technical Assistance Group (TAG) Foundation and Rosenthal’s Theatre Production Service (TPS), correspondence, and a modest amount of publicity, news clippings, and programs.

  2. Mullett & Co. architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    991 architectural drawings (chiefly) ; various sizes, most in folders 89 x 123 cm. or smaller.. 2 albums (9 photographic prints, 2 graphite drawings, 59 photomechanical prints) ; 35 x 23 cm. or smaller.. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Includes many examples of Mullett's designs completed during his tenure as Architect of the Treasury as well as drawings for the Sun Building. Also includes a representative sample of A.B. Mullett & Co.'s output spanning the first quarter of the 20th century. Primarily architectural drawings for residential buildings, industrial buildings, commercial buildings, transportation buildings, religious buildings, and health care facilities in Washington, D.C., designed between 1875 and ca. 1942; government buildings in cities throughout the United States designed between 1866 and 1874, including federal customhouses, post offices; and a skyscraper office building for the Baltimore Sun newspaper. Materials document various phases of the design process, from presentation drawings to working drawings and specifications relating to building projects. The archive also includes engineering drawings, some architectural drawings by other creators, as well as source materials.

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  3. Lester Horton Dance Theater collection, 1918-1996

    approximately 11,600 items. 55 containers. 30.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Lester Horton Dance Theater was a modern dance company and school in Los Angeles in the 1940s and 1950s. Founded by dancer and choreographer Lester Horton (1906-1953), the company served as an incubator for the careers of a generation of dancers, including Alvin Ailey, Carmen de Lavallade, Bella Lewitzky, James Mitchell, Joyce Trisler, and James Truitte. The collection documents Horton's early life and career and the Dance Theater's activities under the management of Frank Eng after Horton's death. Materials include clippings, correspondence, costume and set designs, course descriptions, drawings, financial documents, music, photographs, programs, promotional materials, writings, and typed choreographic scenarios.

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  4. Bulfinch architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    135 items (chiefly architectural drawings) and 3 volumes (text, 51 architectural drawings, and 2 prints). -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily architectural drawings by Charles Bulfinch, Architect of the Capitol (1818-1829), for and of residential buildings, government buildings, monuments, and churches in Washington, D.C., Massachusetts, Maine, and unidentified locations. Among the designs represented in the archive are the U.S. Capitol, the White House, and the First Unitarian Church in Washington, D.C. and the Maine State House in Augusta, Maine. Materials document various phases of the design process, from preliminary and presentation drawings to working drawings. The archive also includes some landscape drawings, engineering drawings, design drawings, study drawings, and perspective studies, as well as architectural drawings formerly attributed to Bulfinch.

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  5. Latrobe architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    211 items (chiefly architectural and engineering drawings). 2 v., 41 leaves (30 architectural drawings). -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily architectural and engineering drawings by Benjamin Henry Latrobe for residential buildings, government buildings, canals, monuments, bank buildings, military buildings, health care facilities, engines, and waterworks in Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Among the designs represented in the archive are the U.S. Capitol, the White House, and Decatur House. Materials document various phases of the design process, from competition and presentation drawings to working drawings. The archive also includes landscape architecture drawings, interior design drawings, and naval architecture drawings, as well as architectural drawings formerly attributed to Latrobe.

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  6. Smith & Associated Architects architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    1,053 items (chiefly architectural drawings); various sizes, most in folders 89 x 123 cm. or smaller.. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily architectural drawings by Chloethiel Woodard Smith & Associated Architects for urban planning projects in the Southwest Urban Renewal Area of Washington, D.C. Among designs represented in the archive are Harbour Square and Capitol Park housing developments, Washington Channel Waterfront, and the Washington Channel Bridge. Materials document various phases of the design process, from preliminary sketches to working drawings, and include correspondence and specifications relating to building projects. The archive also includes landscape architecture drawings, engineering drawings, and planning drawings by other creators as well as some architectural drawings done under the earlier firm names of Keyes, Smith, Satterlee & Lethbridge and Satterlee & Smith.

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  7. Waterman architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    1,132 items (chiefly architectural drawings); various sizes, most in folders 89 x 123 cm. or smaller . 16 v. and 5 prints; 30 x 28 cm. or smaller. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily architectural drawings by Thomas Tileston Waterman for and of historic buildings, residential buildings, religious buildings, and education buildings in Virginia; other locations include Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Massachusetts. Among his work represented in the archive are reconstructions of buildings in Williamsburg, Virginia and other locations; single detached houses; chapels and churches; and measured drawings of historic buildings, some of which were used to illustrate his books. Materials document the preliminary and working phases of the design process, as well as correspondence, notes, and specifications relating to building projects. The archive also includes landscape architecture drawings and architectural drawings by other creators, including Perry, Shaw & Hepburn (where Waterman was employed for a portion of his career).

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  8. Jacobsen architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    620 items (chiefly architectural drawings); various sizes, in folders 89 x 123 cm. or smaller. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily architectural drawings by Hugh Newell Jacobsen for residential buildings in Washington, D.C., and surrounding suburbs. The archive contains designs for single detached houses and student housing for Georgetown University. Materials document various phases of the design process, from preliminary sketches to working drawings, and include miscellaneous supplementary materials relating to building projects. The archive also includes some landscape architecture and engineering drawings.

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  9. Drayer architectural drawing archive (Library of Congress)

    4,661 items (chiefly architectural drawings); various sizes, most in folders 89 x 123 cm. or smaller. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily architectural drawings by Donald H. Drayer for commercial and residential buildings and housing developments in Washington, D.C. and surrounding suburbs. The majority of the drawings were executed from 1945-1973. Among his commissions were single detached houses, some for prominent clients such as Lyndon Johnson and Albert Gore, Sr., and apartment houses and complexes such as Grosvenor Park in Rockville, Maryland, Prospect House in Arlington, Virginia, and the Colonnade in Washington, D.C. Materials document various phases of the design process, from preliminary sketches to working drawings to correspondence and specifications relating to building projects. The archive also includes engineering drawings and landscape architecture drawings as well as some architectural drawings by other creators, interior design drawings by Maria Drayer, and renderings by Saifook Chan.

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  10. Waggaman & Ray archive (Library of Congress)

    7,571 items (chiefly architectural drawings); various sizes, most in folders 89 x 123 cm. or smaller.. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily, architectural drawings by Clarke Waggaman, George N. Ray, and their firm Waggaman & Ray. Among the more than 400 projects, the bulk are residences (e.g. detached and row houses, apartments), office and commercial buildings (e.g. banks and automobile dealerships), and embassies. These building projects are primarily in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., especially on Connecticut Avenue and in the Dupont Circle and Kalorama Heights section, and surrounding suburbs. The design styles include Georgian Revival, Colonial Revival, Federal Revival, and Neoclassical Revival. Collection materials contain preliminary sketches, working drawings documenting various phases of the design process, correspondence, and specifications relating to projects. Design, landscape, and engineering drawings by other creators are also included in the archive.

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