103 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Autographs (Manuscripts).

  1. Irving Fine collection, 1930-1993

    approximately 4,350 items. 21 boxes. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Fine was an American conductor, teacher, and composer whose works assimilated neoclassical, romantic, and serial elements. The bulk of the materials in the collection are musical scores and sketches which represent nearly his entire musical output. In addition, there are photographs, clippings, programs, and scrapbooks, as well as correspondence from twentieth-century musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Alberto Ginastera, Ned Rorem, and William Schuman.

  2. Glenn Dillard Gunn papers, 1802-1961

    approximately 750 items. 14 boxes. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Glenn Dillard Gunn was an American pianist, conductor, music critic, and teacher. The collection contains correspondence from notable musical figures such as Ferruccio Busoni, Teresa Careño, Percy Grainger, and Moriz Rosenthal, as well as writings by and about Gunn, photographs, annotated printed scores, scrapbooks, and other items that document Gunn's life and career.

  3. Jerome Kern collection, 1905-1951

    approximately 7,470 items. 102 boxes. 45 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists primarily of Kern's show music and holograph sketches, most of which are manuscript full and vocal scores of Kern's orchestrators and arrangers, especially Frank Saddler and Robert Russell Bennett. Film and other music is also represented, as well as a small amount of correspondence.

  4. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 563 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  5. Wililam A. Newland and Charles Zeuner collection of music, circa 1735-circa 1900

    around 2,000 items. 58 boxes. 20 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily music (printed and manuscript) for piano, 2 or 4 hands, and songs, with a concentration in sacred vocal works in Latin and English. (The music in Latin may represent the only known source of pre-Cäcilienverein 19th-century American Catholic Church music.) Composers range from Mozart and Rossini to George F. Root and Oliver Shaw. The collection contains the largest extant source of music by Charles Zeuner which was purchased by Newland after Zeuner's death.

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  6. Samuel P. Warren collection, 1849-1915

    approximately 14,000 items. 57 containers . 23.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Samuel P. Warren (1841-1915) was an American organist, choral director, music editor, teacher, and composer. The collection consists of correspondence; concert, recital, and church service programs; and related materials documenting his performance career and, to a lesser extent, that of others.

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  7. Ernst Bacon collection, 1898-1990

    approximately 6,000 items. 54 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Bacon was an American composer, pianist, and conductor. Largely a self-taught composer, Bacon also became an esteemed administrator and educator, serving as director of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project in 1935 and later as composer-in-residence at Syracuse University from 1947-1963. The collection contains music, writings, correspondence, iconography, programs, clippings, publicity materials, and other miscellaneous items.

  8. Margaret ("Peggie") Dwight collection on Luigi Dallapiccola, 1936-1995

    1,150 items . 12 boxes . 6 linear feet . -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Luigi Dallapiccola (1904-1975) was an Italian composer known for his twelve-tone compossitions. The collection contains Dallapiccola's correspondence with Margaret (Peggie) Dwight, including more than 300 letters (written mostly in French) as well as postcards and telegrams. In addition, there are more than 200 articles and programs relating to Dallapiccola's career, most of them collected during those years. The collection also includes a few of Dallapiccola's holograph music manuscripts, most notably his opera Ulisse (Ulysses), excerpts or sketches of his works, and published editions of two full scores for Requiescant and Sex Carmina Alcaei.

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    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  9. George and Böske Antheil papers, circa 1875-1984

    approximately 6,500 items. 43 containers. 17.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    George Antheil was a composer, pianist, author and inventor. The collection consists of materials related to the professional and personal activities of George Antheil and his wife, Elizabeth (Böske) Antheil. It contains holograph music manuscripts, printed scores, published and unpublished writings, business and personal correspondence, subject files, photographs, programs and promotional materials, scrapbooks, artwork, biographical materials, and memorabilia which document the life of this influential composer and his family.

  10. Serge Lifar collection on Serge Diaghilev, 1750-1950

    around 1,350 items. 81 boxes. 91 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection is comprised in large part of printed music, widely representing 18th century Italian and 19th century Russian operatic music. Includes rare pre-revolutionary editions of Russian folk songs, annotated performance scores of Stravinsky, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Gounod, Cimarosa. Non-musical materials include three letters from S. Prokofiev to S. Diaghilev, rare edition of books on music, literature and theater, libretti and synopses, souvenir books and programs and photographs. Several of the programs and photographs show Léon Bakst's set and costume designs. Non-musical materials also include Diaghilev’s personal notebook, containing entries in French, Russian, and English made in 1926-1929.