4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Bellows, Henry W. (Henry Whitney), 1814-1882--Correspondence.

  1. David Ames Wells papers, 1795-1898

    9,000 items. 24 containers. 6 linear feet. 9 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Economist, author, and public official. Correspondence, printed material, writings, and other papers concerning economics, with particular emphasis on taxation, the tariff, and free trade.

  2. Charlotte Cushman papers, 1823-1941

    10,000 items. 21 containers plus 1 oversize. 5.5 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Actress. Correspondence; biographical and genealogical material; annotated scripts and texts of plays, poetry, and readings; newspaper clippings; reviews; and souvenir programs relating chiefly to Cushman's career in the theater.

  3. Clara Barton papers, 1805-1958

    62,000 items. 177 containers plus 6 oversize and 3 vault. 62.6 linear feet. 123 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Philanthropist, nurse, educator, and lecturer. Correspondence, diaries, reports, legal and financial papers, organizational records, lectures, writings, scrapbooks, printed matter, memorabilia, and other papers relating to Barton's work to provide relief services during the Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War, the work of the American National Red Cross which she founded, and the National First Aid Association of America.

  4. Frederick Law Olmsted papers, 1777-1952

    24,000 items. 73 containers plus 1 oversize. 23 linear feet. 60 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Landscape architect. Correspondence, letterbooks, journals, drafts of articles and books, speeches and lectures, biographical and genealogical data, business papers, scrapbooks, maps, drawings, and other papers encompassing Olmsted's career and private life. The papers focus on Olmsted's career as a landscape architect, specifically as a designer of parks and the grounds of private estates and public buildings and as a city and regional planner.