7 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Biddle, Francis, 1886-1968--Correspondence.

  1. Robert Porter Patterson papers, 1909-1956

    45,000 items. 211 containers plus 1 classified. 38 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, jurist, and U. S. secretary of war. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, and speeches reflecting Patterson's career as a jurist and service as assistant secretary, under secretary, and secretary of the War Department.

  2. George Fort Milton papers, 1828-1985

    30,000 items. 100 containers. 36 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Editor, historian, advisor to diplomatic delegations, consultant to U.S. government agencies, and special assistant to Secretary of State Cordell Hull. Correspondence, memoranda, writings, research and historical source material, scrapbooks, printed matter, photographs, and biographical matter relating primarily to Milton’s work as a historian of the Civil War and career as a newspaper editor and in government.

  3. Irving Brant papers, 1910-1977

    37,000 items. 64 containers plus 1 oversize. 24 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, historian, and newspaper editor. Correspondence, memoranda, writings and speeches, research notes, and other papers reflecting Brant's career with various newspapers, in the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt, as a playwright, and his interest in James Madison.

  4. George Biddle papers, 1863-1973

    3,500 items. 31 containers plus 1 oversize. 12 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Artist and public official. Correspondence; diaries; drafts and printed copies of speeches, articles, and a memoir; sketchbooks; scrapbooks; announcements; book reviews; and other papers relating chiefly to Biddle's role in American art, his work for the federal support of art, and the Federal Art Project, including also material relating to his involvment with the United States War Department Art Advisory Committee, World War II, and the Nuremberg War Crime Trials.

  5. James P. McGranery and Regina Clark McGranery papers, 1909-1975

    74,800 items. 225 containers plus 1 oversize and 1 classified. 89 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    James P. McGranery, United States attorney general, district court judge, and member of Congress from Pennsylvania; and Regina Clark McGranery, lawyer. Correspondence, diaries, speeches and writings, financial and legal papers, family papers, appointment books, press releases, and printed matter relating principally to James P. McGranery's duties while assistant to the United States attorney general, United States district judge, United States attorney general, member of the United States Commission on Government Security, lawyer, and lay leader in the Roman Catholic Church. Papers of Regina Clark McGranery reflect her political role during the New Deal, her career as a lawyer, and activities as a Catholic and a leader in the Girl Scouts of America.

  6. Thomas G. Corcoran papers, 1792-1982

    175,175 items. 638 containers plus 1 classified. 245.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer. Correspondence, memoranda, speeches, writings, notes, reports, briefs, opinions, testimony, family papers, business records, newspaper clippings, printed material, and other papers documenting Corcoran's private legal practice and his government service during the first two presidential terms of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

  7. Archibald MacLeish papers, 1907-1981

    20,000 items. 61 containers plus 1 oversize. 25 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Poet, playwright, government official, and Librarian of Congress. Papers include correspondence reflecting MacLeish's relations with friends, literary colleagues, and government associates; notebooks (1919-1940s) containing drafts of poetry and prose; manuscript drafts of plays, speeches and radio broadcasts, and speeches written for Franklin D. Roosevelt, Edward R. Stettinius, and Harry S. Truman; and notes and manuscripts for classroom lectures on modern poetry given by MacLeish at Harvard University (1949-1962).