4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Blitzstein, Marc.

  1. David Diamond papers, 1915-2003

    approximately 48,450 items. 279 containers. 125 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    David Diamond was an award-winning American-Jewish composer and prominent symphonist of the mid-twentieth century. A former student of Roger Sessions and Nadia Boulanger, Diamond ultimately composed eleven symphonies and countless other chamber and vocal works, such as his influential Symphony no. 4 (1945), Elegy in memory of Maurice Ravel (1938), and Rounds (1944). His social circle of musical personalities included Leonard Bernstein, Serge Koussevitzky, Lukas Foss, Maurice Ravel, Igor Stravinsky, Dimitri Mitropoulos, and other prominent composers, many of whom are represented in the collection. As a longtime faculty member of The Juilliard School, Diamond also shaped and inspired subsequent generations of American composers. The collection includes music manuscripts, correspondence, writings, photographs, financial and legal documents, and other materials that document his private and professional life.

  2. Harriet Winslow collection of Nadia Boulanger materials, 1956-1964

    95 items. 1 container. .25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Little is known about Mrs. Cameron (Harriet) Winslow or how she became acquainted with the influential French composer, conductor, and teacher, Nadia Boulanger. This collection consists of photographs, concert programs, and clippings related to Boulanger's career that Mrs. Winslow received from 1956 to 1964. Most of the items are signed, dated and contain simple messages from Boulanger.

  3. Leonard Bernstein collection, circa 1900-1995

    around 400,000 items. 1,723 boxes. 710 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Leonard Bernstein was an American composer, conductor, writer, lecturer, and pianist. The collection contains correspondence, photographs, writings, personal business papers, the archives from his corporate identity, Amberson Inc., scrapbooks, clippings and press materials, programs, datebooks and schedules, iconography, address books, and fan mail. In addition, it contains music manuscripts for many of his compositions, including The Age of Anxiety (Symphony no. 2); Candide; Chichester Psalms; Fancy Free; Jeremiah (Symphony no. 1); On the Waterfront; Prelude, Fugue and Riffs; Serenade after Plato's "Symposium"; Trouble in Tahiti; West Side Story; and Wonderful Town.

  4. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.