3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Bond, Horace Mann, 1904-1972--Correspondence.

  1. Melvin Beaunorus Tolson papers, 1932-1975

    4,000 items. 13 containers. 5 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author; educator, and poet; mayor of Langston, Oklahoma, and poet laureate of Liberia. Correspondence, drafts of writings, speeches, research notes, and printed matter relating primarily to Tolson's literary career and reflecting the Harlem Renaissance and other aspects of African-American art, literature, and culture.

  2. Carter Godwin Woodson papers, 1736-1974

    18,000 items. 54 containers plus 19 oversize. 21.2 linear feet. 46 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Historian, author, and collector. Papers of prominent African Americans, research files, business records, writings, correspondence, and other material relating to Woodson's leadership of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History and to scholarship and publishing in the field of African and African-American history.

  3. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.