4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Bull Run, 2nd Battle of, Va., 1862.

  1. James Jenkins Gillette papers, 1857-1884

    2,000 items ; 6 containers plus 1 oversize ; 2.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    U.S. Army officer, U.S. Army commissioner of subsistence, and U.S. commissioner of claims from Mobile, Alabama. Correspondence, military papers, receipts, court records, and a docket book relating to Gillette’s military service and his activities as claims commissioner.

  2. Ward family papers, 1831-1904

    2,600 items ; 11 containers ; 3.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family from Richmond County, Virginia. Correspondence, broadsides, songs, financial records, printed matter, and other papers of William Norvell Ward, Episcopal clergyman and Confederate soldier, and members of his family including material relating to the Civil War, Reconstruction, and social life and customs in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Maryland, and northern Virginia.

  3. Jubal Anderson Early papers, 1829-1930

    5,000 items ; 16 containers plus 2 oversize ; 9 linear feet ; 1 microfilm reel. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States and Confederate Army officer, lawyer, and state legislator of Virginia. Correspondence, diaries, military papers, speeches and articles, clippings, a scrapbook, printed matter, and maps dated largely after the Civil War.

  4. Fitz-John Porter papers, 1830-1949

    13,000 items ; 67 containers plus 10 oversize ; 26.8 linear feet ; 31 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Army officer and public official in New York, N.Y., and New Jersey. Correspondence, telegrams, reports, memoranda, writings, autobiographical and biographical material, maps, scrapbooks, printed matter, and miscellany largely concerning Porter's court-martial and cashiering out of military service during the Civil War and his later reinstatement and presidential pardon.