4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Bye, George T.--Correspondence.

  1. Robert G. Spivack papers, 1931-1970

    16,800 items. 48 containers plus 2 oversize. 19.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist. Correspondence, articles, book projects, columns, newsletters, newspapers, material relating to speaking engagements, topical files, records of organizations, scrapbooks, printed matter, and miscellaneous material relating to Spivack's career as a newspaper reporter, syndicated columnist, and newsletter publisher and to his participation in student groups and other organizations seeking the intervention of the United States in World War II prior to the Pearl Harbor attack.

  2. Charles A. Lockwood papers, 1904-1967

    7,000 items. 25 containers. 9.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Naval officer. Correspondence, memoranda, diaries, reports, writings, photographs, newspaper clippings, and printed matter relating mainly to Lockwood's naval career during World War II as commander of the United States Submarine Force in the Pacific and his research and writings on submarines after his retirement.

  3. Arthur Stanley Riggs papers, 1929-1952

    900 items. 3 containers plus 1 oversize. 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Naval reserve officer, author, editor, and historian. Correspondence, notes, writings, newspaper clippings, receipts, printed material, maps, and photographs pertaining primarily to Riggs's unpublished book, "Drake of the Seven Seas."

  4. Lyman Bryson papers, 1893-1978

    12,000 items. 51 containers. 20.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Radio and televison broadcaster, author, and educator. Correspondence, diaries, memoranda, articles, lectures, writings, transcripts of broadcasts, subject files, business and financial records, biographical material, appointment books, newspaper clippings, and other papers documenting Bryson's public relations work for the American National Red Cross and the League of Red Cross Societies following World War I, his subsequent work in adult education, and his role in developing educational radio and television programs for the Columbia Broadcasting System.