4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Campbell, Will D.--Correspondence.

  1. Harold C. Fleming papers, 1950-1993

    31,500 items. 90 containers. 36 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Civil rights leader and executive with the Potomac Institute, Washington, D.C. Correspondence, memoranda, annual reports, subject files, proposals, background material, news releases, drafts and published pamphlets and booklets, biographical material, and other papers pertaining to Fleming's work as executive vice president and president of the Potomac Institute, an organization dedicated to eliminating racial discrimination and expanding African-American civil rights.

  2. Edward Lee Plumb papers, 1825-1903

    3,600 items. 20 containers. 5.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomat and secretary of the United States legation in Mexico. Correspondence, journals, clippings, and other papers relating primarily to Plumb’s negotiations relating to the Mexican railway system.

  3. Andrew Johnson papers, 1783-1947

    40,000 items. 245 containers plus 1 oversize. 55.8 linear feet. 55 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    U. S. president, vice president, senator, representative, and army officer. Correspondence, memoranda, diaries, messages and speeches, courts-martial and amnesty records, financial records, lists, newspaper clippings, printed matter, scrapbooks, photographs, and other papers relating chiefly to Johnson's presidency.

  4. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.