24 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Catalogs.

  1. Record newsletters and catalogs from the Edward J. Smith papers, 1958-1981

    approximately 157 items. 1 container. 0.21 linear feet. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Record producer. Primarily newsletters detailing recordings from Edward J. Smith's various record labels.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  2. Isabelle Sayers papers, circa 1886-1980

    3.7 linear feet (6 boxes, 2 map case folders, approximately 3,250 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Paper and photographic materials created and gathered by Isabelle S. Sayers as she assembled her collection of early recordings and audio equipment.

  3. Association of Research Libraries records, 1932-1981

    77,700 items. 222 containers. 88.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Organization of research libraries in the United States and Canada. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, reports, financial records, printed matter, and miscellaneous items relating to the association's membership and its assessment and evaluation projects and services on behalf of client institutions.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. Joint Committee on Materials for Research records, 1925-1940

    25,000 items. 83 containers. 33.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Joint Committee of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council established in November 1929 for the purpose of fostering the acquisition, identification, and preservation of source materials. Correspondence, minutes and agenda of meetings, and papers relating to the committee's surveys of materials for research. Includes information on library and archives projects, permanence of paper stock, union catalogs, offset reproductions, microreproductions, other duplicating techniques, sound reproduction, and copyright.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  5. Alberto Nepomuceno collection, 1887-1988

    approximately 150 items. 6 boxes. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alberto Nepomuceno was a Brazilian composer, conductor, and teacher. The collection consists primarily of scores, most of which are photocopies of holographs, including two operas, nine orchestral, and twelve chamber and solo works, as well as approximately forty songs and other vocal works. In addition, the collection contains several photographs of the composer and his wife and other printed materials.

  6. Les Paul papers, 1904-2000

    5,900 items. 42 containers. 21 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Les Paul was a Grammy-winning musician and inventor known for his virtuosic guitar playing, pioneering of multitrack recording, and invention of the solid-body electric guitar. His inventions left an indelible impact on the music industry. In addition to live concerts he performed on the radio and on television, notably with his second wife, singer and guitarist Mary Ford. The Les Paul Papers contain music arranged for Les Paul's ensembles by himself or others and printed sheet music of popular songs. The collection also contains publicity materials, business papers, schematics, scripts, brochures, photographs, and correspondence.

  7. Hans Heinsheimer papers, 1900-2005

    approximately 4,300 items. 33 containers. 15 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Hans Walter Heinsheimer was a music publisher, author, and journalist. As a publisher and promoter, he worked with many composers, including Béla Bartók, Igor Stravinsky, Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, Zoltán Kodály, George Antheil, Leonard Bernstein, Alban Berg, Leoš Janáček, and Ernst Krenek. The correspondence, photographs, writings, and subject files in this collection help record his instigation of, participation in, or presence at many significant events regarding music of the twenty-first century. The scrapbooks document the reception each of his three books received upon publication.

  8. Paul Löwenberg collection of music by the Johann Strauss and Joseph Lanner families, 1825-1929

    approximately 1,636 items. 77 containers. 26 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Johann Strauss Sr. and Joseph Lanner have been dubbed the "waltz kings" for their significant contributions as composers of popular dance music during the nineteenth century. They transformed the music of a simple country dance into one that graced ballrooms around the world, laying the foundation for their sons to continue their work and further develop the waltz as a musical form. This collection primarily consists of first edition printed scores for piano works published by the two composers and their sons Johann Strauss Jr., Josef Strauss, Eduard Strauss, and August Lanner.

  9. Gertrude Clarke Whittall Foundation collection on Nicolò Paganini, 1810-1967

    approximately 1,125 items. 29 containers. 18 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nicolò Paganini was an Italian violinist, violist, and composer known for his technical prowess and virtuosity. This collection contains a significant amount of iconography depicting Paganini as well as other composers and related objects and places. Other materials include manuscript and printed music, correspondence, programs, publicity materials, personal papers, publications, and clippings that document Paganini’s professional activities and personal life. Additional catalogs, inventories, and other materials in the papers of Maia Bang Hohn provide further information about the contents and history of the collection.

  10. Record industry publicity collection, 1937-1979

    21.75 linear feet (41 boxes and 8 oversize folders, approximately 17,900 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Press releases, record catalogs, radio program scripts, promotional posters, monthly publications about new record releases, and other materials advertising sound recordings.