4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Censorship--United States.

  1. People for the American Way and People for the American Way Foundation records, 1980-2009

    105,000 items ; 359 containers plus 1 oversize ; 143.4 linear feet ; 107 digital files (273 MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Progressive advocacy organization. Founded in 1981 by Norman Lear, Barbara Jordan, Theodore M. Hesburgh, and Andrew Heiskell as Citizens for Constitutional Concerns, Inc. Renamed People for the American Way in 1985 and People for the American Way Foundation in 1998. The records include administrative files, reports, correspondence, meeting materials, photographs, publications, press files,...

  2. Huntington Cairns papers, 1780-1984

    58,450 items ; 165 containers plus 15 oversize ; 73.1 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, government official, and lawyer. Correspondence, manuscripts and galley proofs of writings, speeches, subject and research files, family papers, printed material, scrapbooks, and other papers concerning Cairns's career with the U.S. Bureau of Customs as a federal censor of imported books and films, as a lawyer with the Maryland Tax Revision Commission (1938-1941), and as a writer on the...

  3. Albert Sidney Burleson papers, 1845-1943

    13,000 items ; 37 containers ; 9 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States representative from Texas, postmaster general in Woodrow Wilson's cabinet, and Democratic Party leader. Correspondence, memoranda, printed matter, scrapbooks, and articles relating chiefly to Burleson’s career in politics and government, including letters to and from Woodrow Wilson.

  4. Manton Marble papers, 1838-1916

    14,000 items ; 97 containers ; 20.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Editor and publisher. Correspondence, drafts of articles and letters, financial papers, newspaper clippings, photographs, and other material relating to Marble’s career as editor and owner of the New York World, and as a senior member of the national Democratic Party.