42 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Chamber music.

  1. Glenn Dillard Gunn papers, 1802-1961

    approximately 750 items. 14 boxes. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Glenn Dillard Gunn was an American pianist, conductor, music critic, and teacher. The collection contains correspondence from notable musical figures such as Ferruccio Busoni, Teresa Careño, Percy Grainger, and Moriz Rosenthal, as well as writings by and about Gunn, photographs, annotated printed scores, scrapbooks, and other items that document Gunn's life and career.

  2. Arsis Press records, 1947-2007

    approximately 7,260 items. 32 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Arsis Press was a music publishing company in Washington, D.C., founded by composer Clara Lyle Boone in 1974 to publish music by women composers. The Arsis Press Records include printed music by nearly forty composers, financial records, business papers, and correspondence.

  3. Milton Babbitt music sketches, 1947-2006

    65 items. 19 containers. 6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Milton Babbitt was an American composer, mathematician, music theorist, and teacher best known for his innovations in the fields of serial and electronic music. The collection consists entirely of holograph sketches for original compositions by Babbitt, including his highly-regarded Philomel (1964), Reflections (1966), and Quintet for clarinet and strings (1997).

  4. Robert Parris music manuscripts, 1959-1972

    22 items. 1 container plus 6 bound scores. 1.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Robert Parris (1924-1999) was an American composer who specialized in small ensembles. After studying at the Juilliard School of Music with Peter Menin and William Bergsma and completing a Fulbright Scholarship with Arthur Honegger in France, Parris settled in the Washington, D.C., area where he taught at George Washington University for more than three decades. His works have been performed by the National Symphony Orchestra, including the world premiere of his Concerto for Five Kettledrums and Orchestra, which brought him international recognition. The collection contains manuscript scores, parts, and sketches for original compositions by Parris.

  5. Irving Fine collection, 1930-1993

    approximately 4,350 items. 21 boxes. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Fine was an American conductor, teacher, and composer whose works assimilated neoclassical, romantic, and serial elements. The bulk of the materials in the collection are musical scores and sketches which represent nearly his entire musical output. In addition, there are photographs, clippings, programs, and scrapbooks, as well as correspondence from twentieth-century musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Alberto Ginastera, Ned Rorem, and William Schuman.

  6. Wililam A. Newland and Charles Zeuner collection of music, circa 1735-circa 1900

    around 2,000 items. 58 boxes. 20 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily music (printed and manuscript) for piano, 2 or 4 hands, and songs, with a concentration in sacred vocal works in Latin and English. (The music in Latin may represent the only known source of pre-Cäcilienverein 19th-century American Catholic Church music.) Composers range from Mozart and Rossini to George F. Root and Oliver Shaw. The collection contains the largest extant source of music by Charles Zeuner which was purchased by Newland after Zeuner's death.

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  7. Alberto Nepomuceno collection, 1887-1988

    approximately 150 items. 6 boxes. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alberto Nepomuceno was a Brazilian composer, conductor, and teacher. The collection consists primarily of scores, most of which are photocopies of holographs, including two operas, nine orchestral, and twelve chamber and solo works, as well as approximately forty songs and other vocal works. In addition, the collection contains several photographs of the composer and his wife and other printed materials.

  8. Ernst Bacon collection, 1898-1990

    approximately 6,000 items. 54 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Bacon was an American composer, pianist, and conductor. Largely a self-taught composer, Bacon also became an esteemed administrator and educator, serving as director of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project in 1935 and later as composer-in-residence at Syracuse University from 1947-1963. The collection contains music, writings, correspondence, iconography, programs, clippings, publicity materials, and other miscellaneous items.

  9. Jascha Heifetz papers, 1786-1991

    approximately 17, 500 items. 280 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Russian-American musician Jascha Heifetz was a virtuosic violinist who became a dedicated teacher. The collection includes his personal music library of original compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions. Concert programs document his performances from 1911 to 1974, and photographs, photo albums, and scrapbooks span the violinist's entire life. The correspondence contains letters from significant twentieth-century musical figures such as Leopold Auer, Benjamin Britten, Sergei Prokofiev, George Bernard Shaw, and Sir William Walton.

  10. George and Böske Antheil papers, circa 1875-1984

    approximately 6,500 items. 44 containers. 17.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    George Antheil was a composer, pianist, author and inventor. The collection consists of materials related to the professional and personal activities of George Antheil and his wife, Elizabeth (Böske) Antheil. It contains holograph music manuscripts, printed scores, published and unpublished writings, business and personal correspondence, subject files, photographs, programs and promotional materials, scrapbooks, artwork, biographical materials, and memorabilia which document the life of this influential composer and his family.