8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Choral music.

  1. Tams-Witmark (Original Library of Congress collection), 1701-1915

    approximately 7,000 items. 829 containers. 164 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Tams-Witmark Music Library was established in 1925 through the merger of the Arthur W. Tams Music Library and the rental library of M. Witmark & Sons. The Tams-Witmark (Original Library of Congress Collection) contains music (manuscript and printed scores) that was being performed in the United States during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The scope of the collection ranges from eighteenth-century operas of Handel and Glück to a musical by George M. Cohan. The bulk of the materials are nineteenth-century English, French, German and Italian operas and operettas, the majority in full score, with some instrumental parts. Most of the scores have been annotated with cuts and performance markings, and some feature reduced or non-standard orchestrations. The collection also contains a small amount of concert music, including secular and sacred choral works, patriotic music, symphonic scores, and incidental music.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Robert Evett collection, 1942-2001

    approximately 1,450 items. 9 containers. 6.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Robert Evett (1922-1975) was a composer, arts editor, and critic who made his home primarily in the Washington, D.C., area. This collection contains several scores, sketches, and instrument parts for works composed by Evett; biographical information collected by Evett's family after his death; and his published book and music reviews for the "Atlantic Monthly," "New Republic," and "Washington Star-News."

  3. Norman Luboff papers, 1940-1988

    approximately 10,000 items. 140 containers. 38 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Norman Luboff was an American arranger, choir director, and publisher. The collection features Luboff's working music library of choral works and songs, spanning from the mid-1950s to the late 1970s, that were performed by the Norman Luboff Choir in concert and on recordings. The collection also contains arrangements of Scandinavian folk music and a variety of materials documenting the performances and tours of the Norman Luboff Choir and the creation of Luboff's Songs of Man: The International Book of Folk Songs. Additional items include awards, clippings, programs, and press releases.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. Arsis Press records, 1947-2007

    approximately 7,260 items. 32 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Arsis Press was a music publishing company in Washington, D.C., founded by composer Clara Lyle Boone in 1974 to publish music by women composers. The Arsis Press Records include printed music by nearly forty composers, financial records, business papers, and correspondence.

  5. Milton Babbitt music sketches, 1947-2006

    65 items. 19 containers. 6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Milton Babbitt was an American composer, mathematician, music theorist, and teacher best known for his innovations in the fields of serial and electronic music. The collection consists entirely of holograph sketches for original compositions by Babbitt, including his highly-regarded Philomel (1964), Reflections (1966), and Quintet for clarinet and strings (1997).

  6. Robert Parris music manuscripts, 1959-1972

    22 items. 1 container plus 6 bound scores. 1.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Robert Parris (1924-1999) was an American composer who specialized in small ensembles. After studying at the Juilliard School of Music with Peter Menin and William Bergsma and completing a Fulbright Scholarship with Arthur Honegger in France, Parris settled in the Washington, D.C., area where he taught at George Washington University for more than three decades. His works have been performed by the National Symphony Orchestra, including the world premiere of his Concerto for Five Kettledrums and Orchestra, which brought him international recognition. The collection contains manuscript scores, parts, and sketches for original compositions by Parris.

  7. Alan Hovhaness music manuscripts, 1939-1969

    approximately 925 items. 6 containers plus 23 bound scores. 3 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alan Hovhaness was an American composer, researcher, and organist of Armenian descent. He is predominantly known for works heavily inspired by non-European traditions and for drawing on exotic rhythmic, melodic, and instrumental resources founded in his own Armenian ancestry, other Middle Eastern styles, and, in his later years, Japanese and Korean instruments and styles. This finding aid collates classed holograph scores, parts, and sketches by Hovhaness that he donated to the Music Division from 1959 to 1970.

  8. Alexander Zemlinsky music manuscripts and other papers, 1887-1939

    approximately 350 items. 28 containers. 8 linear feet. 13 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alexander Zemlinsky was an Austrian composer, conductor, pianist, and educator whose students included Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Alma Mahler, and Anton Webern. The collection consists of holograph music manuscripts for nearly all of Zemlinsky’s repertoire, as well as some printed music. Other materials include manuscript and printed music by other composers, personal papers, correspondence, and writings by others.