10 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Choruses.

  1. J. Fischer & Bro. music publishers collection, 1950-1970

    around 750 items. 34 containers. 11 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The J. Fischer & Bro. Music Publishers Collection contains music manuscripts and published or photo-reproduced musical scores, in original or arranged versions. The majority of the collection are choral works, both sacred and secular, many with piano or organ accompaniment. In addition, there are original works for organ and piano, as well as piano and organ transcriptions. Most of these works were published by Fischer & Bro.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Léo Delibes music manuscripts, 1857-1890

    85 items. 6.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Léo Delibes was a French composer known primarily for his stage works, including operas, ballets, and incidental music. His compositions display the wit, lightness, and elegance characteristic of nineteenth century French music and were premiered at the Théâtre des Bouffes-Parisiens, Opéra-Comique, and Théâtre Lyrique, among others. His ballets Coppélia and Sylvia and opera Lakmé have remained standards of the repertoire. The collection includes holograph manuscripts and sketches for many of his operas, ballets, and vocal and piano music.

  3. Luiz Heitor Corrêa de Azevedo papers, circa 1865-1990

    approximately 8,000 items. 83 containers. 70 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Luiz Heitor Corrêa de Azevedo (1905-1992) was a Brazilian musicologist, folklorist, educator, and music critic. His papers document his life and career through correspondence, writings, teaching materials, notebooks, research and subject files, photographs, and awards. Correspondence, as well as holograph, facsimile, and inscribed scores, illustrate Azevedo's relationships with twentieth-century composers from South America, North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. His own holograph sketches and scores chronicle his early years as a composer and arranger.

  4. Samuel P. Warren collection, 1849-1915

    approximately 14,000 items. 57 containers . 23.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Samuel P. Warren (1841-1915) was an American organist, choral director, music editor, teacher, and composer. The collection consists of correspondence; concert, recital, and church service programs; and related materials documenting his performance career and, to a lesser extent, that of others.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  5. Margaret ("Peggie") Dwight collection on Luigi Dallapiccola, 1936-1995

    1,150 items . 12 boxes . 6 linear feet . -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Luigi Dallapiccola (1904-1975) was an Italian composer known for his twelve-tone compossitions. The collection contains Dallapiccola's correspondence with Margaret (Peggie) Dwight, including more than 300 letters (written mostly in French) as well as postcards and telegrams. In addition, there are more than 200 articles and programs relating to Dallapiccola's career, most of them collected during those years. The collection also includes a few of Dallapiccola's holograph music manuscripts, most notably his opera Ulisse (Ulysses), excerpts or sketches of his works, and published editions of two full scores for Requiescant and Sex Carmina Alcaei.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Society for the Preservation of the American Musical Heritage collection, 1792-1969

    approximately 475 items. 16 containers. 6.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Karl Krueger was an American conductor, best known as the first American-born conductor of a major United States orchestra. He founded the Society for the Preservation of the American Musical Heritage in 1958 with the goal of collecting and recording music by American composers. The collection primarily consists of musical scores and parts with a small amount of business papers.

  7. Florence B. Price music manuscripts, 1928-1953

    26 items. 3 containers. 1 linear foot. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Florence B. Price was a composer and pianist who rose to prominence during the 1930s when she became the first African American woman to have a symphony performed by a major American orchestra. She is predominantly known for her songs and arrangements of spirituals, but also composed symphonies, concertos, instrumental chamber music, vocal compositions, instructional piano music, and music for radio. This finding aid collates classed holograph scores by Price written under her own name and that of her pseudonym, VeeJay, which were submitted as copyright deposits to the Library of Congress from 1928 to 1964.

  8. Hall Johnson papers, 1913-1980

    approximately 100 items. 3 containers. 1.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Hall Johnson was a choral conductor, composer, and arranger of spirituals. Through his arrangements, writings, and performances of the Hall Johnson Choir, he raised the profile of the African American spiritual as a significant art form. The collection contains holograph and manuscript scores for several of his compositions and arrangements, works by other composers, concert programs, scripts, and legal and financial papers related to his estate. Titles in this collection contain demeaning language.

  9. Bertha W. Edwards collection on Hiram Simmons, 1907-1980

    27 items. 1 container. 1 linear foot. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Hiram Simmons (1874–1938) was a Black composer and musician in Portsmouth, Virginia, known primarily for his gospel music. He also worked as an educator, music publisher, and organist. The Simmons material collected by Portsmouth librarian Bertha W. Edwards includes published music, one photograph, and a biographical sketch.

  10. Anton Gloetzner music manuscripts, 1870-1920

    approximately 170 items. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Anton Gloetzner (1850-1928) was a German-American composer, organist, and educator who taught at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., from 1873 to 1928. The Anton Gloetzner Music Manuscripts consist of holograph scores, parts, and sketches for his original compositions and arrangements of works by other composers. A significant quantity of unprocessed sketch material remains; descriptions of these items will be added to the finding aid at a later time.