17 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Concertos.

  1. Glenn Dillard Gunn papers, 1802-1961

    approximately 750 items. 14 boxes. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Glenn Dillard Gunn was an American pianist, conductor, music critic, and teacher. The collection contains correspondence from notable musical figures such as Ferruccio Busoni, Teresa Careño, Percy Grainger, and Moriz Rosenthal, as well as writings by and about Gunn, photographs, annotated printed scores, scrapbooks, and other items that document Gunn's life and career.

  2. Jascha Heifetz papers, 1786-1991

    approximately 17, 500 items. 280 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Russian-American musician Jascha Heifetz was a virtuosic violinist who became a dedicated teacher. The collection includes his personal music library of original compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions. Concert programs document his performances from 1911 to 1974, and photographs, photo albums, and scrapbooks span the violinist's entire life. The correspondence contains letters from significant twentieth-century musical figures such as Leopold Auer, Benjamin Britten, Sergei Prokofiev, George Bernard Shaw, and Sir William Walton.

  3. Randolph S. Rothschild collection, 1942-1992

    approximately 225 items. 11 boxes. 6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Randolph S. Rothschild Collection consists primarily of music and accompanying correspondence, programs, and reviews. The majority of the music in the collection is facsimile scores of compositions commissioned by the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra from American composers such as Milton Babbitt, Henry Cowell, Ross Lee Finney, Lukas Foss, Ernst Krenek, Roger Reynolds, Christopher Rouse, Gunther Schuller, and Charles Wuorinen. Many of these scores are inscribed to Rothschild and signed by the composers, and a few include programs and reviews of the concerts at which they were performed.

  4. National Flute Association, Inc. archives, 1898-2012

    approximately 33,055 items. 127 boxes. 60 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The National Flute Association, Inc. Archives primarily comprises the correspondence and working papers of elected officers, committee members, and other volunteers serving the The National Flute Association from 1970-2012. Included are business papers of the Executive Offices, manuscript and printed music, donations to the organization from individual members, publications by the association, awards and commissions, and material regarding the association's annual conventions. An addition to the collection includes the papers of flutist, composer, and arranger Arÿ van Leeuwen and dates from 1898 to 1957.

  5. Nikolai Lopatnikoff collection, 1916-1979

    around 1085 items. 27 boxes. 37 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection includes music, manuscript and printed, of Lopatnikoff, as well as of other composers; correspondence and personal papers; photographs, clippings, and programs; writings by and about Lopatnikoff; and offical documents. A significant amount of material is related to Lopatnikoff's opera Danton. Among the correspondents are Rudolf Bing, Aaron Copland, Serge Koussevitzky, Joseph Rosenstock, Julius Rudel, Nicolas Slonimsky, and William Steinberg.

  6. Roy Harris papers, 1893-1998

    6,450 items. 88 containers. 40.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Roy Harris was an American composer. The collection contains materials that document his life and career, including manuscript scores, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, business papers, financial and legal documents, programs, publicity files, photographs, scrapbooks, work files, posters, clippings, and biographical materials.

  7. Robert Craft collection on Igor Stravinsky, 1912-1966

    Approximately 300 items. 24 containers. 12.4 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Robert Craft Collection on Igor Stravinsky consists of music by composer and conductor Igor Stravinsky, primarily scores and parts in the form of publisher proofs, ozalid copies, or other photo reproductions. Most items are annotated by Stravinsky with his corrections, conducting markings, or both. Some parts contain annotations by performers. The bulk of the music dates from the middle of Stravinsky’s neoclassical period in the 1940s and his serial period, which began in the 1950s and continued to the end of his life. Robert Craft became Stravinsky’s music assistant after meeting the composer in 1948. This collection is part of the music and recordings he amassed through their association.

  8. David Diamond papers, 1915-2003

    approximately 48,450 items. 279 containers. 125 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    David Diamond was an award-winning American-Jewish composer and prominent symphonist of the mid-twentieth century. A former student of Roger Sessions and Nadia Boulanger, Diamond ultimately composed eleven symphonies and countless other chamber and vocal works, such as his influential Symphony no. 4 (1945), Elegy in memory of Maurice Ravel (1938), and Rounds (1944). His social circle of musical personalities included Leonard Bernstein, Serge Koussevitzky, Lukas Foss, Maurice Ravel, Igor Stravinsky, Dimitri Mitropoulos, and other prominent composers, many of whom are represented in the collection. As a longtime faculty member of The Juilliard School, Diamond also shaped and inspired subsequent generations of American composers. The collection includes music manuscripts, correspondence, writings, photographs, financial and legal documents, and other materials that document his private and professional life.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  9. Elliott Carter music manuscripts and other papers, 1933-1971

    approximately 18,900 items. 55 containers plus bound scores. 19 linear feet. 22 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Among other accolades, American composer Elliott Carter was a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his second and third string quartets. A student of Nadia Boulanger, his works combined American and European styles of modernism, and his compositional style, based around collections of pitches, was later described as musical set theory. Carter was also known for his use of proportional tempo changes, which is referred to by scholars as metric modulation. Carter composed in a wide variety of genres, including symphonies, concertos, chamber music, ballets, and choral music. This finding aid collates classed holograph scores, sketches, and parts by Carter that were donated to the Music Division beginning in the 1960s. Additional music materials, programs, and a small amount of photographs and other papers will be added to this document in the future.

  10. Willi Reich collection on Alban Berg, 1905-1956

    approximately 275 items. 2 containers. 1.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alban Berg (1885–1935) was an Austrian composer and member of the Second Viennese School, along with Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern, who together advanced atonal and twelve-tone music. The Willi Reich Collection on Alban Berg consists of correspondence between the composer and musicologist Willi Reich (1898-1980), articles and clippings, and printed music for Berg's vocal and instrumental works.