6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Coolidge, Elizabeth Sprague, 1864-1953.

  1. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation collection, 1894-1953

    56,680 items. 109 containers. 48.50 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge was a composer, pianist, and patron of music. In 1925, she created the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation at the Library of Congress in support of chamber music. The collection contains Coolidge's correspondence to and from many of the prominent musical artists of the first half of the twentieth century. Extensive correspondence between Coolidge and Library of Congress librarians and administrators is also included. The remaining materials in the collection, including photographs, scrapbooks, business papers, programs, publicity materials, iconography, realia, and clippings, are available for research and will be incorporated into the finding aid at a later date. Music manuscripts of works commissioned by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge or the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation in the Library of Congress comprise a substantial portion of the collection and are cataloged individually.

  2. Harold Spivacke collection, 1923-1984

    around 3,900 items. 33 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Harold Spivacke was a music librarian, administrator, musicologist, and musician. He was chief of the Library of Congress Music Division for thirty-five years, from 1937 until 1972. The collection contains materials relating to his life and career, including correspondence, student notebooks, speeches, his dissertation, photographs, clippings, programs, manuscript and printed music, artwork, awards and honorary degrees, and business papers.

  3. Ernest Bloch collection, 1888-1981

    around 18,840 items. 63 boxes. 30 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernest Bloch was a Swiss-born composer, violinist, conductor, and photographer. The collection, which documents his life and work, includes manuscripts (music and lecture material), correspondence, business and financial papers, photographs, programs, promotional material, clippings, writings about Ernest Bloch, personal papers, and printed matter.

  4. Jacobo Ficher collection, 1864-1997

    approximately 6,000 items. 66 boxes. 72 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection comprises practically all the composer's works, mainly holograph manuscript scores in all major categories of composition. It also includes documents, correspondence (to and from Leonard Bernstein, Carlos Chávez, Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, Aaron Copland, Henry Cowell, Vivian Fine, Alberto Ginastera, Paul Kletzki, Nicolai Malko, Eugene Ormandy, Arthur Rubinstein, Nicolas Slonimsky, Leopold Stokowski, and others), writings, programs, and scrapbooks.

  5. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  6. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.