20 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Copland, Aaron, 1900-1990--Correspondence.

  1. Marian MacDowell papers, 1876-1969

    2000 items. 10 containers. 3.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, manuscripts of writings, clippings and other printed material, memorabilia, and other papers relating primarily to Marian MacDowell's activities with the MacDowell Colony, the artist colony in Peterborough, N.H., established to honor her husband, Edward MacDowell.

  2. Irving Fine collection, 1930-1993

    approximately 4,350 items. 21 boxes. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Fine was an American conductor, teacher, and composer whose works assimilated neoclassical, romantic, and serial elements. The bulk of the materials in the collection are musical scores and sketches which represent nearly his entire musical output. In addition, there are photographs, clippings, programs, and scrapbooks, as well as correspondence from twentieth-century musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Alberto Ginastera, Ned Rorem, and William Schuman.

  3. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 563 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  4. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  5. Jacobo Ficher collection, 1864-1997

    approximately 6,000 items. 66 boxes. 72 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection comprises practically all the composer's works, mainly holograph manuscript scores in all major categories of composition. It also includes documents, correspondence (to and from Leonard Bernstein, Carlos Chávez, Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, Aaron Copland, Henry Cowell, Vivian Fine, Alberto Ginastera, Paul Kletzki, Nicolai Malko, Eugene Ormandy, Arthur Rubinstein, Nicolas Slonimsky, Leopold Stokowski, and others), writings, programs, and scrapbooks.

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  6. Nikolai Lopatnikoff collection, 1916-1979

    around 1085 items. 27 boxes. 37 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection includes music, manuscript and printed, of Lopatnikoff, as well as of other composers; correspondence and personal papers; photographs, clippings, and programs; writings by and about Lopatnikoff; and offical documents. A significant amount of material is related to Lopatnikoff's opera Danton. Among the correspondents are Rudolf Bing, Aaron Copland, Serge Koussevitzky, Joseph Rosenstock, Julius Rudel, Nicolas Slonimsky, and William Steinberg.

  7. Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation, Sub-Committee on Music papers, 1920-1950

    approximately 9,800 items. 30 boxes. 15 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation, Sub-Committee on Music was established in 1942 to attend to the morale of military personnel through the provision of music materials and the support of bands at various levels – camp, fort, field unit, and individual performer. Library of Congress Music Division chief Harold Spivacke served as the Sub-Committee chairman. These files document his role and that of his staff in this war effort through correspondence, photographs, memoranda, notated music and lead sheets, reports, songbooks, and technical and training manuals.

  8. Minna Lederman Daniel collection, 1896-1993

    around 21,000 items. 24 containers. 12.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Minna Lederman Daniel was an American writer and editor who specialized in music and dance. A major influence on 20th century music, she was a founding member of the League of Composers, a group of musicians and proponents of modern music. She helped launch the League’s magazine, The League of Composers’ Review (later called Modern Music), which was the first American journal to manifest an interest in contemporary composers. The collection contains her correspondence, financial and legal papers, writings, clippings, and photographs.

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  9. Artur Rodzinski collection, 1868-1989

    5,000 items. 62 containers. 30 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Artur Rodzinski Collection focuses on Rodzinski’s professional work as a conductor and his personal life in the United States, Europe and Latin America. It covers Rodzinski’s performances (live, radio, and sound recordings), schedules, and biographical information. The collection also includes material related to Rodzinski’s wife Halina. The materials primarily consist of correspondence, annotated music, magazine articles, newspaper clippings, legal documents, programs and advertisements. Most of the collection is in English, with a significant amount of material in Polish.

  10. Franko Goldman family papers, 1886-1972

    314 items . 4 containers. 2 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Franko Goldman Family Papers are primarily related to the professional lives of brothers Sam (1857-1937) and Nahan Franko (1861-1930), their nephew Edwin Franko Goldman (1878-1956), and his son Richard Franko Goldman (1910-1980). Sam and Nahan were violinists and conductors; Edwin was a bandmaster and band composer; and Richard was a bandmaster, composer, educator, and music critic. The materials include correspondence from prominent musicians, composers and conductors; a selection of writings, including a typescript of the unpublished autobiography of Edwin Franko Goldman and several articles by Richard Franko Goldman; photographs of Richard Franko Goldman, the Goldman Band, and various composers and musicians; and six scrapbooks belonging to Sam Franko that contain manuscript notes and commentaries and other ephemera relating to his life and career. In addition, the collection includes an autograph book compiled by Richard Franko Goldman's great-aunt Lybia Franko, which contains seventy-four inscriptions and autographs of prominent musical and theatrical figures.

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