29 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Copland, Aaron, 1900-1990.

  1. MacDowell Colony records, 1869-2017

    82,000 items. 214 containers plus 4 oversize. 90 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. 1,252 digital files (9.63 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The MacDowell Colony was founded as an artist colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, in 1907 by Marian MacDowell who dedicated it as a memorial to her husband, American composer Edward MacDowell. The bulk of the records reflects the operational and administrative functions of the colony, its parent organization, the Edward MacDowell Association, and its fundraising staff based in New York. Consists of correspondence, applications for admission, minutes of meetings, reports, legal and financial papers, fundraising and event planning materials, office files, and miscellany.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 563 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  3. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  4. Minna Lederman Daniel collection, 1896-1993

    around 21,000 items. 24 containers. 12.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Minna Lederman Daniel was an American writer and editor who specialized in music and dance. A major influence on 20th century music, she was a founding member of the League of Composers, a group of musicians and proponents of modern music. She helped launch the League’s magazine, The League of Composers’ Review (later called Modern Music), which was the first American journal to manifest an interest in contemporary composers. The collection contains her correspondence, financial and legal papers, writings, clippings, and photographs.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  5. Martha Graham collection, 1896-2003

    350,100 items. 398 containers. 590 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Martha Graham was an American modern dancer, choreographer, teacher and company director. The Martha Graham Collection is comprised of materials that document her career and trace the history of the development of her company, Martha Graham Dance Company, which became the Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance, and school, Martha Graham School, later to be called the Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance.

  6. Modern Music archives, 1909-1983

    around 810 items. 8 containers. 5.75 linear feet. Microfilm (93/20012 [MUS]--scrapbooks only). -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The League of Composers was founded in New York in 1923 to promote American composers and introduce audiences to the best in new music through high quality performances. Its quarterly journal, Modern Music, was published from 1924 to 1946, and edited by Minna Lederman Daniel. It is one of the most distinguished collections of criticism and scholarship concerning early twentieth-century musical arts. The archives contains materials documenting the cessation of the journal, correspondence, financial and budget documents, fundraising materials, clippings, committee meeting minutes, photographs and artwork, stage and costume designs, contemporary concert and festival programs, scrapbooks containing promotional materials, publications of the League, and writings by Lederman Daniel.

  7. Mildred Spiegel Zucker collection of Leonard Bernstein correspondence and related materials, 1936-1991

    135 items. 1 container. 0.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Music teacher Mildred Spiegel Zucker was a childhood friend of Leonard Bernstein's, with whom she maintained a lifelong friendship. The collection mostly consists of correspondence that Bernstein sent to Zucker dating from his time as a counselor at Camp Onata, as a student at the Curtis Institute of Music, and during the beginning of his career in New York.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  8. David Diamond papers, 1915-2003

    approximately 48,450 items. 279 containers. 125 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    David Diamond was an award-winning American-Jewish composer and prominent symphonist of the mid-twentieth century. A former student of Roger Sessions and Nadia Boulanger, Diamond ultimately composed eleven symphonies and countless other chamber and vocal works, such as his influential Symphony no. 4 (1945), Elegy in memory of Maurice Ravel (1938), and Rounds (1944). His social circle of musical personalities included Leonard Bernstein, Serge Koussevitzky, Lukas Foss, Maurice Ravel, Igor Stravinsky, Dimitri Mitropoulos, and other prominent composers, many of whom are represented in the collection. As a longtime faculty member of The Juilliard School, Diamond also shaped and inspired subsequent generations of American composers. The collection includes music manuscripts, correspondence, writings, photographs, financial and legal documents, and other materials that document his private and professional life.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  9. Hans Heinsheimer papers, 1900-2005

    approximately 4,300 items. 33 containers. 15 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Hans Walter Heinsheimer was a music publisher, author, and journalist. As a publisher and promoter, he worked with many composers, including Béla Bartók, Igor Stravinsky, Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, Zoltán Kodály, George Antheil, Leonard Bernstein, Alban Berg, Leoš Janáček, and Ernst Krenek. The correspondence, photographs, writings, and subject files in this collection help record his instigation of, participation in, or presence at many significant events regarding music of the twenty-first century. The scrapbooks document the reception each of his three books received upon publication.

  10. Don Christlieb photographs, 1940s-1980s

    32 items. 1 box. 0.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Don Christlieb (1912-2001) was an orchestral bassoonist, chamber musician, and innovative reed maker. He performed on more than 700 movie scores during the "Golden Age of Hollywood" as an employee of movie studios, namely 20th Century Fox. Christlieb was also an artist and photographer who frequently depicted his colleagues in his work. The collection consists of 32 prints made from his original photographs.