9 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Costume design.

  1. Peggy Clark papers, 1880-1997

    64,240 items . 473 containers. 291 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Peggy Clark (1915-1996) was an American lighting, scenic, and costume designer. The collection includes light plots, scenic renderings, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, blueprints, programs, photographs, posters, scripts, scrapbooks, clippings, notes, memorabilia and other materials related to her life and career.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Florence Klotz costume designs, 1971-1985

    670 items. 19 containers. 11.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Florence Klotz was an American costume designer best known for her work on Broadway musical collaborations with composer Stephen Sondheim and director Harold (Hal) Prince, including Follies (1971), A Little Night Music (1973), and Pacific Overtures (1976). The collection contains finished costume designs, sketches, fabric samples, and other materials for five musicals and one film adaptation.

  3. Miles White costume designs, 1942-1977

    approximately 150 items. 8 containers. 7.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Miles White was an American scenic and costume designer best known for his work on Oklahoma! (1943), Carousel (1945), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1949), Bye Bye Birdie (1960), and other Broadway musicals and stage productions. The collection consists mostly of finished designs and sketches, some of which include fabric samples and other related materials.

  4. John Alden Carpenter collection, 1891-1961

    around 1,700 items. 12 boxes. 5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    John Alden Carpenter was an American composer. The collection contains music materials, primarily holograph manuscripts of Carpenter's songs, chamber and orchestral pieces, and dramatic works; correspondence; writings; photographs and artwork; biographical materials; certificates and honors; programs; clippings; and scrapbooks.

  5. Lester Horton Dance Theater collection, 1918-1996

    approximately 11,600 items. 55 containers. 30.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Lester Horton Dance Theater was a modern dance company and school in Los Angeles in the 1940s and 1950s. Founded by dancer and choreographer Lester Horton (1906-1953), the company served as an incubator for the careers of a generation of dancers, including Alvin Ailey, Carmen de Lavallade, Bella Lewitzky, James Mitchell, Joyce Trisler, and James Truitte. The collection documents Horton's early life and career and the Dance Theater's activities under the management of Frank Eng after Horton's death. Materials include clippings, correspondence, costume and set designs, course descriptions, drawings, financial documents, music, photographs, programs, promotional materials, writings, and typed choreographic scenarios.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  6. Martha Graham collection, 1896-2003

    350,100 items. 398 containers. 590 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Martha Graham was an American modern dancer, choreographer, teacher and company director. The Martha Graham Collection is comprised of materials that document her career and trace the history of the development of her company, Martha Graham Dance Company, which became the Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance, and school, Martha Graham School, later to be called the Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance.

  7. Harriet Hoctor collection, 1868-1977

    1,700 items. 8 containers. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    American dancer and choreographer Harriet Hoctor (1905-1977) began performing on the vaudeville stage in the early 1920s. By the mid-1930s, she was a featured dancer on Broadway and in motion pictures. The collection documents Hoctor's professional life including items related to her early dance training at the Louis H. Chalif Normal School of Dancing in New York and her later career leading the Harriet Hoctor School of Ballet in Boston. Materials include choreographic notes, clippings, costume sketches, music, photographs, personal papers, programs, and correspondence from family members, former students, and notables such as Mary Pickford, Walter Winchell, and Florenz Ziegfeld.

  8. Modern Music archives, 1909-1983

    around 810 items. 8 containers. 5.75 linear feet. Microfilm (93/20012 [MUS]--scrapbooks only). -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The League of Composers was founded in New York in 1923 to promote American composers and introduce audiences to the best in new music through high quality performances. Its quarterly journal, Modern Music, was published from 1924 to 1946, and edited by Minna Lederman Daniel. It is one of the most distinguished collections of criticism and scholarship concerning early twentieth-century musical arts. The archives contains materials documenting the cessation of the journal, correspondence, financial and budget documents, fundraising materials, clippings, committee meeting minutes, photographs and artwork, stage and costume designs, contemporary concert and festival programs, scrapbooks containing promotional materials, publications of the League, and writings by Lederman Daniel.

  9. Federal Theatre Project collection, 1932-1943

    around 525,000 items. 1,475 containers. 523 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Federal Theatre Project, created by the U.S. Works Progress Administration in 1935, was designed to conserve and develop the skills of theater workers, re-employ them on public relief, and to bring theater to thousands in the United States who had never before seen live theatrical performances. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, play and radio scripts, reports, research studies, manuals, publications, bulletins, forms, lists, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, charts, costume and set designs, blue-prints, posters, addressograph plates, photographs, negatives, slides, playbills, and other records documenting the activities of the Federal Theatre Project and its impact on all aspects of the theater.