6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Cowell, Sidney Robertson, 1903-1995.

  1. Modern Music archives, 1909-1983

    around 810 items. 8 containers. 5.75 linear feet. Microfilm (93/20012 [MUS]--scrapbooks only). -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The League of Composers was founded in New York in 1923 to promote American composers and introduce audiences to the best in new music through high quality performances. Its quarterly journal, Modern Music, was published from 1924 to 1946, and edited by Minna Lederman Daniel. It is one of the most distinguished collections of criticism and scholarship concerning early twentieth-century musical arts. The archives contains materials documenting the cessation of the journal, correspondence, financial and budget documents, fundraising materials, clippings, committee meeting minutes, photographs and artwork, stage and costume designs, contemporary concert and festival programs, scrapbooks containing promotional materials, publications of the League, and writings by Lederman Daniel.

  2. Sidney Robertson Cowell collection, 1901-1992

    5067 items. 28 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Sidney Robertson Cowell (1903-1995) was a folksong and ethnic music collector and recordist, ethnographer, ethnomusicologist, teacher, writer, and wife of composer Henry Cowell. The collection consists of her personal papers which document all aspects of her life and work. The collection includes correspondence relating to personal and professional matters; fieldwork reports, fieldnotes, song lists and other materials from her field recording projects and trips; articles, essays, reviews, and papers written by Sidney Robertson Cowell; articles and narratives by and about Henry Cowell; autobiographical narratives and essays, clippings, family histories and other materials relating to her professional career and personal life; photographs; teaching materials; and song sheets and song books. In addition, the collection contains photocopies of a selection of Henry Cowell holographs, several annotated by Sidney Robertson Cowell, and a selection of folk songs with piano settings by Henry Cowell in his own hand.

  3. Seeger family collection, 1880-2001

    approximately 16,000 items. 132 containers. 58 linear feet. 6 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Seeger Family Collection documents the lives and careers of pioneering musicologist Charles Louis Seeger, his second wife, modernist composer Ruth Crawford Seeger, and their eldest daughter, folksinger and songwriter Peggy Seeger through their music manuscripts, personal and professional papers, and correspondence. The collection also includes papers relating to the Crawford family and materials associated with Pete Seeger, Mike Seeger, other Seeger family members, and Seeger/MacColl family members.

  4. Oliver Daniel papers, 1759-1997

    21,600 items. 80 containers. 52.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Oliver Daniel was an American arts administrator, musicologist, radio director and producer, and composer. The collection includes correspondence, manuscript and printed scores, photographs, programs, clippings, scrapbooks and periodicals.

  5. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.

  6. W.P.A. California Folk Music Project collection, 1936-1991

    7 boxes 4.5 linear feet.. manuscripts: 115 folders.. 239 sound discs (35 hours) : analog, 78 rpm, mono. ; 12 in.. 170 photographic prints : black and white ; various sizes.. 24 drawings.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The California Folk Music Project of the California Work Projects Administration (WPA) was conceived and directed by Sidney Robertson Cowell and co-sponsored by the Music Department of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Music Division, Library of Congress from 1938 to 1940. Additional support was provided by the New Music Society of California and the Society of California Pioneers. The resulting collection of sound recordings, photographs, correspondence, field notes, and drawings documents the musical culture, including religious music and folk song, of many ethnic and English-language performers in northern California. The collection includes the documentation of the music of Anglo Americans, Armenians, Assyrians, Basques, Croatians, English, Finns, Hungarians, Icelanders, Italians, Norwegians, Russian Molokans, Scots, Portuguese, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Spaniards and Spanish Americans from 1938 to 1940. The sound recordings were deposited in the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress in 1940. The collection also includes a few instantaneous sound discs made by Sidney Robertson Cowell in Missouri and Iowa for the Farm Security Administration in 1936-1937, and includes folk music research, writing, photographs, and technical drawings and sketches of the musical instruments, generated by Cowell and by the WPA staff who worked for her, plus related documents to 1991.