7 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Donovan, William J. (William Joseph), 1883-1959--Correspondence.

  1. Edward Tracy Clark correspondence and reports, 1923-1935

    9,000 items. 22 containers. 8.5 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Presidential secretary, lawyer, and businessman of Washington, D.C. Correspondence relating primarily to Clark's work as a consultant on legislative, customs, and tariff matters for various business concerns, and letters from his service as secretary to President Calvin Coolidge.

  2. Wallace Rankin Deuel papers, 1905-1971

    6,500 items. 62 containers plus 1 classified and 1 vault container. 20.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Intelligence officer and journalist. Correspondence, journals, writings, lectures, transcripts of radio broadcasts, scrapbooks, and other papers relating to Deuel's career as an intelligence officer during World War II with the Office of Strategic Services, as a journalist with the Chicago Daily News and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and as a foreign intelligence analyst with the Central Intelligence Agency.

  3. William Frederick Halsey papers, 1907-1959

    20,000 items. 55 containers plus 2 oversize. 22 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Naval officer. Correspondence, war diaries, logs, journals, narratives of military campaigns, military orders, books, periodicals, poems, songs, newspaper clippings, and memorabilia relating mostly to Halsey's social and business career after World War II, his personal life and club activities, and the history of American naval involvement in the Pacific Theater during World War II.

  4. Robert Helyer Thayer papers, 1920-1980

    8,700 items. 29 containers plus 1 classified and 1 oversize. 12.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomat, lawyer, and New York public official. Correspondence, memoranda, legal briefs and case files, reports, financial records, scrapbook, printed matter, maps, photographs, and other papers documenting Thayer's legal career, political activities in the Republican Party, service in naval intelligence during World War II, and work for the State Department.

  5. Lessing J. Rosenwald papers, 1819-1979

    28,000 items. 81 containers plus 2 oversize. 32.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Bibliophile, businessman, and philanthropist. Correspondence, subject files, speeches and writings, printed matter, and miscellany relating to Rosenwald's career with Sears, Roebuck & Company; his activities on behalf of various Jewish causes and his opposition to Zionism; his public service work with the National Recovery Administration and the War Production Board; his various charitable, educational, and cultural philanthropies; and his work as a bibliographer and collector of books and prints.

  6. Arthur J. Goldberg papers, 1793-1995

    78,000 items. 296 containers plus 14 oversize and 2 classified. 120.7 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, lawyer, secretary of labor, and diplomat. Correspondence, case files, certiorari memoranda, legal files, speeches and writings, subject files, reports, printed matter, and scrapbooks relating to Goldberg's career as a lawyer, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, secretary of labor, and United States representative to the United Nations.

  7. Archibald MacLeish papers, 1907-1981

    20,000 items. 61 containers plus 1 oversize. 25 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Poet, playwright, government official, and Librarian of Congress. Papers include correspondence reflecting MacLeish's relations with friends, literary colleagues, and government associates; notebooks (1919-1940s) containing drafts of poetry and prose; manuscript drafts of plays, speeches and radio broadcasts, and speeches written for Franklin D. Roosevelt, Edward R. Stettinius, and Harry S. Truman; and notes and manuscripts for classroom lectures on modern poetry given by MacLeish at Harvard University (1949-1962).