8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Downes, Olin, 1886-1955.

  1. Woody Guthrie manuscript collection, 1935-1950

    3 boxes. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Woody Guthrie manuscript collection includes unpublished correspondence, most are letters from Guthrie to Alan Lomax, assistant in charge of the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress, dated 1940-1942; plus drawings; essays; song lyrics; and a songbook, "Songs of Woody Guthrie."

  2. Sergei Rachmaninoff archive, 1872-1992

    17,668 items . 89 containers. 68.6 linear feet. 6 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Sergei Rachmaninoff was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. The Sergei Rachmaninoff Archive contains material related to his life and career after he and his family left Russia in 1917 to establish themselves in the United States. The archive contains Rachmaninoff's holograph music manuscripts, correspondence, writings, biographical articles and clippings, awards and honors, concert programs, scrapbooks, financial papers, iconography, realia, and published books and other materials held within the personal library of Rachmaninoff and his family. A section is also devoted to the papers of Sophie Satin, the composer's sister-in-law and biographer. This section contains Satin's writings, as well as the results of her lifelong research on Rachmaninoff.

  3. Harold Spivacke collection, 1923-1984

    around 3,900 items. 33 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Harold Spivacke was a music librarian, administrator, musicologist, and musician. He was chief of the Library of Congress Music Division for thirty-five years, from 1937 until 1972. The collection contains materials relating to his life and career, including correspondence, student notebooks, speeches, his dissertation, photographs, clippings, programs, manuscript and printed music, artwork, awards and honorary degrees, and business papers.

  4. Louis Kaufman collection, 1925-2008

    approximately 14,000 items. 42 containers. 21.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Louis Kaufman was an American violinist. His wife, Annette Leibole Kaufman, was a pianist who served as his accompanist for over fifty years. The collection contains materials related to their personal lives and professional careers, including correspondence with many notable musical and artistic figures of the 20th century, concert programs, photographs, scrapbooks, subject files, and other miscellaneous materials.

  5. Ernest Bloch collection, 1888-1981

    around 18,840 items. 63 boxes. 30 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernest Bloch was a Swiss-born composer, violinist, conductor, and photographer. The collection, which documents his life and work, includes manuscripts (music and lecture material), correspondence, business and financial papers, photographs, programs, promotional material, clippings, writings about Ernest Bloch, personal papers, and printed matter.

  6. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  7. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.

  8. A.P. Schmidt Company archives, 1869-1958

    34,775 items. 514 containers. 280 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Arthur Paul Schmidt (1846-1921) was a German-born music publisher who pioneered the development and dissemination of American music. The A.P. Schmidt Company Archives documents his firm's publishing activites in Boston, Leipzig and New York, beginning with his tenure, through his successors, and until the firm was absorbed by Summy-Birchard in 1960. The Archives consists of the original manuscripts from which the music was printed, printed music, personal and corporate correspondence, photographs (primarily composers/arrangers), business records, plate books, publication books, stock and cash books.