119 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Economic conditions.

  1. Harper's magazine records, 1847-1983

    255,000 items. 701 containers. 290 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Editorial, production, and business records including correspondence, reports, drafts of articles, and galleys for monthly issues of Harper's Magazine, a compendium of social commentary, news, history, criticism, poetry and fiction.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Jackie Robinson papers, 1934-2001

    7,000 items. 17 containers. 6.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Baseball player, civil rights leader, and corporate executive. Correspondence, fan mail, financial and legal records, drafts of speeches and writings, printed matter, newspaper clippings, and miscellaneous items relating to Robinson as the first African American to play major league baseball in the twentieth century and to various business and civic activities following his baseball career, including his service as a corporate executive and his participation in the civil rights movement, religious and humanitarian organizations, broadcast and media affairs, and politics.

  3. Gerhard Alden Gesell papers, 1913-2003

    69,000 items. 198 containers plus 1 classified and 1 oversize. 78 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Judge and lawyer. Correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts of writings, speeches, agenda and minutes of meetings, opinions, orders, dockets, notes, sentencing information, case files, and other legal papers and material pertaining primarily to Gesell's career as judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia and documenting his cases in the areas of civil rights, constitutional law, antitrust matters, patent cases, and government regulations.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. Roy Wilkins papers, 1901-2001

    28,700 items. 78 containers. 31.3 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Civil rights leader and journalist. Correspondence, memoranda, diary, manuscripts of speeches, newspaper columns, and articles, subject files, reports, minutes, committee, board, and administrative material, printed material, and other papers relating primarily to Wilkins's career with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in various positions between 1931 and 1977, especially his service as executive director (1965-1977).

  5. Anatoliĭ Zakharovich Rubinov papers, 1968-1996

    21,350 items . 61 containers. 24.4 linear feet. -- European Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Anatolii Zakharovich Rubinov was a journalist and sub-editor for the weekly newspaper Literaturnaia gazeta, where he published articles on contemporary social and economic issues and their impact on the everyday lives of Soviet citizens. The collection is comprised of letters from readers and government agencies to the editorship of Literaturnaia gazeta, primarily in response to Rubinov's articles, but also to articles by other writers.

  6. Chosŏn Sangsa Chusik Hoesa collection, 1947-1950

    3,400 items. 20 containers. -- Asian Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    First international trading company by the North Korean government. Correspondence, reports, invoices, statistics, meeting and planning notes, agendas, memoranda, personnel records, and other organizational records documenting the activities of Chosŏn Sangsa Chusik Hoesa (Archive of a North Korean corporation). Also includes material relating to Pukchosŏn Hwagyo Yonhaphoe (North Korea Overseas Chinese Federation) which document the experiences of overseas Chinese in North Korea.

  7. Henry Shapiro papers, 1920-1992

    51,500 items. 151 containers plus 1 oversize. 61.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist. Correspondence, wire service reports, reference files, speeches and writings, and personal files pertaining to Henry Shapiro's career and writings as chief correspondent in the Moscow bureau of United Press International from the 1930s to the 1970s.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  8. National Woman's Party records, 1850-1975

    200,000 items. 491 containers plus 3 oversize. 197.2 linear feet. 97 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    National organization in the women's rights movement, founded 1916-1917 by Alice Paul (chairman). The records include correspondence, administrative files, minutes of meetings, reports, financial and legal records, personal papers, printed material, newspaper clippings, photographs, and other items, including the records of the World Woman's Party (1938-1958), documenting efforts by the party to promote congressional passage of the federal woman suffrage amendment and the Equal Rights Amendment.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  9. A. Philip Randolph papers, 1909-1979

    13,000 items. 56 containers plus 4 oversize. 23.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Labor union official and civil rights leader. Correspondence, documents relating to presidential executive orders, memoranda, notes, printed matter, reports, scrapbooks, speeches, and other material reflecting Randolph's role in the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the Fair Employment Practices Committee, marches on Washington for employment and equal rights for African Americans, and the civil rights movement.

  10. Nicholas Philip Trist papers, 1795-1873

    6,500 items. 16 containers. 6.4 linear feet. 17 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomat and lawyer. Family and general correspondence, letterbooks, memoranda, notes, reports, legal and financial papers, writings, clippings, printed matter, and other papers relating to Trist's tenure as U.S. consul in Havana and his role in negotiating the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ending the Mexican War. Other topics include Trist's business interests, particularly his sugar plantations in Cuba and Louisiana; the establishment of the University of Virginia; the Oregon boundary question; politics and military affairs in Mexico; the slave trade; and family and personal affairs.