6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Educational change--United States.

  1. Hedrick Smith papers, 1923-2010

    200,000 items. 570 containers plus 13 oversize and 1 classified. 235.2 linear feet. 26,688 digital files (107.90 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist, author, and documentarian. Correspondence, memoranda, interview transcripts, drafts of speeches, articles, books, notes, radio broadcasts, legal material, research material, family papers, press releases, printed material, posters, maps, digital files, and other papers relating primarily to Smith's research for his books and television productions about the Soviet Union, United States politics, and issues affecting the American working class. Documents his career with the New York Times while stationed in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Russia, and elsewhere, as well as his coverage for United Press International of the civil rights movement in the South and space exploration, 1959-1962.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  2. Glenn T. Seaborg papers, 1866-1999

    370,000 items. 1,016 containers plus 1 oversize and 4 classified. 407.6 linear feet. 14 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nuclear chemist, public official, and educator. Journals, correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, telephone and appointment logs, scientific research, speeches, writings, photographs, biographical material, newspaper clippings, and other printed matter documenting Seaborg's work as a nuclear chemist who codiscovered numerous chemical elements, as a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, California, and as chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission from 1961 to 1971.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  3. Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1944-1952

    250 items. 1 container. 0.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    African-American civil rights leader and educator. Correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, speeches, organizational newsletters, and newspaper clippings documenting Hedgeman's activities on behalf of civil rights for African Americans and educational reform, and especially her efforts to continue the work of the United States Fair Employment Practices Committee following World War II.

  4. Charl Ormond Williams papers, 1924-1959

    3,200 items. 9 containers. 4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Educator. Correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, reports, newspaper clippings, and printed material relating to Williams’s association with the National Education Association of the United States and her work in the field of education and educational reform, including her participation in the 1944 White House Conference on Rural Education.

  5. People for the American Way and People for the American Way Foundation records, 1980-2009

    105,000 items. 359 containers plus 1 oversize. 143.4 linear feet. 107 digital files (273 MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Progressive advocacy organization. Founded in 1981 by Norman Lear, Barbara Jordan, Theodore M. Hesburgh, and Andrew Heiskell as Citizens for Constitutional Concerns, Inc. Renamed People for the American Way in 1985 and People for the American Way Foundation in 1998. The records include administrative files, reports, correspondence, meeting materials, photographs, publications, press files, financial documents, and legal files documenting public policy initiatives, field projects, and litigation actions.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Leadership Conference on Civil Rights records, 1943-2014

    128,000 items. 364 containers plus 1 oversize and 7,620 digital files (13.61GB). 145.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, a national association of civil rights organizations, was founded in 1950 by Roy Wilkins (chairman), A. Philip Randolph, and Arnold Aronson. The records include correspondence, memoranda, minutes, notes of meetings, position papers, reports, financial records, congressional testimony, speeches and writings, clippings, printed matter, digital files including text, image, sound, and moving image files as well as multimedia content, and other records documenting efforts by the organization to lobby for and monitor enforcement of civil rights legislation at the national level.