3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Field recordings--New Jersey.

  1. Robert Sonkin Alabama and New Jersey collection, 1937-1941

    7 manuscript folders in 1 box; 64 12-inch acetate-aluminum discs. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, field notes, reports, recording logs, transcripts of song texts, and sound recordings of African American music traditions and folkways, collected by Robert Sonkin, primarily in Gee's Bend, Alabama, in 1941.

  2. Don Yoder collection of tape and disc recordings

    381 items. 1 box (approximately 79 items). 77 sound tape reels : analog ; 10 in.. 92 sound tape reels : analog ; various sizes. 128 sound cassettes : analog. 1 sound disc : analog, 45 rpm ; 6 in.. 2 photographic prints : black and white ; 3 1/2 in. x 5 in.. 1 photographic negative : black and white ; 3 in. x 1 1/2 in.. 1 videocassette (VHS) : sound ; 1/2 in.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of field recordings made by professor Don Yoder to document various religious sects and religious and secular folk traditions primarily in Pennsylvania and in the northeastern United States. Included are recordings of Pennsylvania German conversation, interviews, hymns, prayers, church services including sermons, folk dance music, humorous songs, and folk festivals. Manuscripts include a few published articles by Don Yoder and various folk festival programs.

  3. Working in Paterson Project collection, 1993-2002

    39 boxes. 21 linear feet. 12,327 items (5,400 manuscript pages, 6,621 graphic materials, 90 original sound recordings, 204 electronic media, and 12 artifacts). -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of manuscripts, sound recordings, photographs, artifacts, publications, and ephemera from an ethnographic field project conducted by the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, which documented occupational culture in Paterson, New Jersey in 1994. Subjects include the textile industry, industrial architecture, machine shops, labor unions, family owned businesses, dressmaking, and ethnic restaurants. A single manufacturing firm, Watson Machine International, was the focus of an in-depth study. The project focused on the ways in which community life and values are shaped by work and how the theme of work intersects with other themes, namely family, ethnicity, gender, neighborhood, religion, and change over time.

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