70 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Financial records.

  1. WTON papers, 1938-1972

    1.5 linear feet (4 boxes, approximately 1,193 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The WTON papers consist of correspondence, financial statements, and a catalog of recordings from the records of WTON radio station (Staunton, Virginia) and it's founding owner-operator, Charles P. Blackley.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  2. Bob Hope collection, circa 1900-2009

    557,000 items ; 770 linear feet (1958 boxes). 71,300 items ; 91 linear feet (187 boxes). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Bob Hope Collection consists of scripts, jokes, monologues, correspondence, manuscripts, promotional materials, photographs, and clippings documenting Hope's work as an entertainer, actor, comedian, and philanthropist, across multiple mediums and disciplines including radio, television, film, and live performance.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  3. Arch Oboler collection, 1916-1992

    161.6 linear feet (364 boxes, 1 negative folder, 11 map case folders, approximately 127,075 items). 107 sound tape reels : . 124 sound cassettes : . 4 sound discs : . 1 microphone. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nearly the entirety of the prolific output of radio playwright and independent film maker Arch Oboler (1909-1987) in radio, motion pictures, television, theater, and print is contained in the Arch Oboler Collection. Featured are his radio plays from the 1930s and 1940s and the first three-dimensional feature film, Bwana Devil.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  4. H. Vose Greenough Jr. papers, 1937-1972

    .5 linear feet (2 boxes). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Personal papers of H. Vose Greenough Jr., founder and owner of Technichord Records, a small recording company in Brookline, Massachusetts, as well as materials from Technichord Records.

  5. Jerry Lewis papers, 1951-2011

    approximately 45,650 items. 220 containers. 66 linear feet. -- Moving Image Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Jerry Lewis Papers consist of scripts and sketch material; memos and other correspondence; itineraries; business and legal papers; photographic prints, proof sheets, and negatives; press clippings and publicity; and other materials related to the film and television career of comedian, actor, and filmmaker Jerry Lewis, primarily from the period following the breakup of the act he formed with singer and comedian Dean Martin. Also included are papers related to Lewis's work with the Muscular Dystrophy Association's annual telethon, and his teaching work at the University of Southern California.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  6. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 563 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  7. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  8. Fritz Kreisler collection, 1845-1969

    around 1,800 items. 26 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Fritz Kreisler was an Austrian-born American violinist and composer. The collection contains Kreisler's original compositions in sketch, manuscript (including holographs), and printed form. In addition, it contains manuscript and heavily annotated printed copies of Kreisler's transcriptions of other composers' music. It also contains correspondence, financial and legal documents, programs, clippings, writings, photographs, awards and honors. The collection includes the papers of Kreisler's biographer Louis Lochner, which contain Kreisler's personal papers and material related to the biography.

  9. Ragheb Moftah collection of Coptic Orthodox liturgical chants and hymns, 1926-1997

    circa 3,000 items. 18 boxes. 6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of transcriptions of Coptic chant music by Ernest Newlandsmith and Margit Toth. Both contain transcriptions of the Liturgy of St. Basil. Basil. Marian Robertson Wilson created a guide to Moftah's audio tapes in 1996, which consists of transcriptions, transliterations and translations into English of the texts sung on the tapes. Wilson also devised a new order for the pieces on the tapes, putting them in a more logical order, as used in the context of the liturgy. Included is also correspondence, most importantly of letters from Ernest Newlandsmith to Ragheb Moftah concerning their collaboration. Writings in the collection consist of articles by Moftah and an autobiography, both manuscript and printed. There are notes about chant written by Moftah. The collection also contains articles written by Marian Robertson Wilson concerning Coptic chant from the transcriptions Moftah contracted. Other materials include clippings, tickets, receipts, photographs and a few legal papers.

  10. Charles Mingus collection, 1925-2015

    approximately 15,000 items. 76 boxes. 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Charles Mingus was a jazz double bassist, band leader, and composer. A prolific recording artist and pioneer in double bass technique, Mingus composed works that often incorporated elements of hard bop and gospel music and featured collective improvisation. The collection includes manuscript and printed music by Mingus; writings; correspondence; business papers; clippings; programs; publicity materials; photographs of Mingus, his family, and colleagues, such as Eric Dolphy, Dannie Richmond, Max Roach, Oscar Pettiford, and Miles Davis; artwork and artifacts; and sound recordings.