6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) French spoliation claims.

  1. Henry Mason Morfit papers, 1819-1858

    4,000 items ; 13 containers ; 5.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer. Correspondence and financial and business papers relating to Morfit's Washington, D.C., practice as a claims lawyer and as a political figure in the administrations of Andrew Jackson.

  2. Lovering-Taylor family papers, 1727-1926

    2,000 items ; 11 containers plus 2 oversize ; 4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Lovering-Taylor families of Boston, Mass.; New York, N.Y.; and Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Correspondence, diaries, financial papers, business records, legal papers, biographical and genealogical material, clippings, printed material, and other papers chiefly of Joseph Taylor (1745(?)-1816), merchant and Loyalist, relating to business and trade during the Revolution, the Loyalist cause,...

  3. United States finance collection, 1761-1908

    2,500 items ; 10 containers plus 4 oversize ; 5 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, bond payments, claims against the federal government and the Bank of the United States, French and Spanish indemnity payments, indentures, miscellaneous state and federal legal items, statements of accounts, consulate reports, United States lottery drawings, and other state and federal financial documents.

  4. Causten-Pickett papers, 1765-1916

    33,000 items ; 113 containers ; 45 linear feet ; 2 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    James H. Causten, businessman of Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D.C., who worked to settle French spoliation claims; John T. Pickett, United States and Confederate diplomat and army officer, and lawyer of Washington, D.C.; and Pickett's son, Theodore John Pickett, lawyer of Washington, D.C., who succeeded to Causten's interest in the claims cases. Correspondence, insurance policies, powers...

  5. Andrew Jackson Donelson papers, 1779-1943

    4,000 items ; 24 containers plus 1 oversize ; 6 linear feet ; 14 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, editor, army officer, diplomat, and presidential secretary. Correspondence, journals, draft messages of Andrew Jackson, diplomatic papers, newsclippings, scrapbook, sketches, photos, and other papers covering Donelson's career as aide-de-camp and secretary to Andrew Jackson, charge d'affaires to Texas, minister to Prussia, editor of the Washington Union, and candidate for vice president....

  6. Henry Bartholomew Cox collection, 1492-1960

    200 items ; 1 container ; 0.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Professor of history. Correspondence and other material relating chiefly to French spoliation claims; and an autograph collection.