9 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Harris, Roy, 1898-1979--Correspondence.

  1. Archibald MacLeish papers, 1907-1981

    20,000 items. 61 containers plus 1 oversize. 25 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Poet, playwright, government official, and Librarian of Congress. Papers include correspondence reflecting MacLeish's relations with friends, literary colleagues, and government associates; notebooks (1919-1940s) containing drafts of poetry and prose; manuscript drafts of plays, speeches and radio broadcasts, and speeches written for Franklin D. Roosevelt, Edward R. Stettinius, and Harry S. Truman; and notes and manuscripts for classroom lectures on modern poetry given by MacLeish at Harvard University (1949-1962).

  2. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 563 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  3. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  4. Nicolas Slonimsky collection, 1873-1997

    approximately 118,600 items. 363 boxes. 198 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection contains materials collected by Slonimsky throughout his lifetime that document his life and work as musicologist, composer, conductor, lecturer and author. Included are personal biographical materials; Slonimsky's writings (drafts, typescripts, reprints, etc.) of newspaper, periodical, journal, and magazine articles, record liner notes, radio broadcasts, and talks, published and unpublished; music composed by Slonimsky, manuscript and printed; concert programs; correspondence, among many others, with Henry Cowell, Alexandre Gretchaninoff, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, and Edgar Varèse; biographical materials on composers and performers mostly generated when Slonimsky was editing Baker's and The international cyclopedia; music collected by Slonimsky, manuscript and printed and multi-composer collections; among the manuscripts are many short holographic works and fragments; scrapbooks; and iconographical material, such as family photographs and those of composers and musicians from the former Soviet Union, as well as little known musicians from the United States and elsewhere.

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  5. Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation, Sub-Committee on Music papers, 1920-1950

    approximately 9,800 items. 30 boxes. 15 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation, Sub-Committee on Music was established in 1942 to attend to the morale of military personnel through the provision of music materials and the support of bands at various levels – camp, fort, field unit, and individual performer. Library of Congress Music Division chief Harold Spivacke served as the Sub-Committee chairman. These files document his role and that of his staff in this war effort through correspondence, photographs, memoranda, notated music and lead sheets, reports, songbooks, and technical and training manuals.

  6. Roy Harris papers, 1893-1998

    6,450 items. 88 containers. 40.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Roy Harris was an American composer. The collection contains materials that document his life and career, including manuscript scores, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, business papers, financial and legal documents, programs, publicity files, photographs, scrapbooks, work files, posters, clippings, and biographical materials.

  7. Harold Spivacke collection, 1923-1984

    approximately 3,900 items. 33 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Harold Spivacke was a music librarian, administrator, musicologist, and musician. He was chief of the Library of Congress Music Division for thirty-five years, from 1937 until 1972. The collection contains materials relating to his life and career, including correspondence, student notebooks, speeches, his dissertation, photographs, clippings, programs, manuscript and printed music, artwork, awards and honorary degrees, and business papers.

  8. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation collection, 1894-1953

    56,680 items. 109 containers. 48.50 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge was a composer, pianist, and patron of music. In 1925, she created the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation at the Library of Congress in support of chamber music. The collection contains Coolidge's correspondence to and from many of the prominent musical artists of the first half of the twentieth century. Extensive correspondence between Coolidge and Library of Congress librarians and administrators is also included. The remaining materials in the collection, including photographs, scrapbooks, business papers, programs, publicity materials, iconography, realia, and clippings, are available for research and will be incorporated into the finding aid at a later date. Music manuscripts of works commissioned by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge or the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation in the Library of Congress comprise a substantial portion of the collection and are cataloged individually.

  9. Oliver Daniel papers, 1759-1997

    21,600 items. 80 containers. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Oliver Daniel was an American arts administrator, musicologist, radio director and producer, and composer. The collection includes correspondence, manuscript and printed scores, photographs, programs, clippings, scrapbooks and periodicals.