5 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Heyward, DuBose, 1885-1940.

  1. MacDowell Colony records, 1869-2017

    82,000 items. 214 containers plus 4 oversize. 90 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. 1,252 digital files (9.63 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The MacDowell Colony was founded as an artist colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, in 1907 by Marian MacDowell who dedicated it as a memorial to her husband, American composer Edward MacDowell. The bulk of the records reflects the operational and administrative functions of the colony, its parent organization, the Edward MacDowell Association, and its fundraising staff based in New York. Consists of correspondence, applications for admission, minutes of meetings, reports, legal and financial papers, fundraising and event planning materials, office files, and miscellany.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. George and Ira Gershwin collection, 1895-2008

    60,415 items. 143 containers. 64 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Composer George Gershwin (1898-1937) and his lyricist brother Ira (1896-1983) wrote some of the most significant American popular songs of the first half of the twentieth century. Working with novelist and poet DuBose Heyward, they created the great American opera Porgy and Bess. Additionally, George Gershwin composed several singularly American concert works, including An American in Paris and Rhapsody In Blue, and both brothers produced many distinguished songs working with other collaborators. The George and Ira Gershwin Collection contains music manuscripts, handwritten and typewritten lyric sheets, printed music, correspondence, photographs, programs and publicity materials, legal and financial documents, and thirty-one scrapbooks, which present nearly a complete record of the Gershwins' lives and work as they were chronicled in the contemporary press.

  3. Harvey Granat collection of George and Ira Gershwin materials, 1926-1973

    25 items. 2 containers. 1 linear foot. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Harvey Granat is a businessman and singer specializing in music of the Great American Songbook. His collection consists of original materials of composer George Gershwin (1898-1937) and his brother, lyricist Ira Gershwin (1896-1983), who wrote some of the most significant popular songs of the first half of the twentieth century. The highlight of Granat's collection is the original manuscript for "They Can't Take That Away From Me," written for the film Shall We Dance (1937).

  4. Marian MacDowell papers, 1876-1969

    2000 items. 10 containers. 3.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, manuscripts of writings, clippings and other printed material, memorabilia, and other papers relating primarily to Marian MacDowell's activities with the MacDowell Colony, the artist colony in Peterborough, N.H., established to honor her husband, Edward MacDowell.

  5. American / Century Play Company scripts and business papers, 1894-2006

    approximately 16,000 items. 185 containers. 93.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The American Play Company / Century Play Company was a conglomerate publishing house that represented many of the most prominent American playwrights and dramatists of the 20th century. The scripts and business papers in the collection document numerous aspects of American theater production history, including author representation, show production, publishing, and licensing for television, film, radio, and stock productions. The script library notably includes five working copies of The Glass Menagerie (1944) by Tennessee Williams and early performance drafts of Eugene O'Neill's Anna Christie (1921), Mourning Becomes Electra (1931), and Strange Interlude (1923). The collection also highlights several unpublished, unproduced works by female playwrights, such as Harriet Ford and Margery Benton Cooke.